Diabetes in school

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by wi2boston2wi, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. wi2boston2wi

    wi2boston2wi Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2007

    My nephew is nine years old and will be going into 5th grade this coming fall. In our school district the 5th graders go to a different school with the 6th-8th graders.
    My nephew is diabetic and I just recently found out that there will not be a nurse in his new school building. Is this legal? My brother and sister-in-law think that he may be at the age that he can start giving his shots to himself, but they would feel a lot more comfortable knowing there is a nurse at school at all times just incase something goes wrong.
    Has anyone else encountered this situation? Does a school have to have a nurse in the building at all times? Is there anything my brother and his family can do legally? The school is in Wisconsin if that makes any difference.
    Thanks for your help!
     
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  3. Musicalgator

    Musicalgator Companion

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    Jan 17, 2007

    We have a nurse at our school only half-time. Last year I don't believe they had a nurse at all. We have a lot of lil ones with issues (colostomy bags, trachea tubes) and she can still only be with us 1/2 day due to funds in the district.
     
  4. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I had a student a couple of years ago that was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. (She has had a lot of trouble and they have put an insulin pump in.) When she was diagnosed we were made a home base for our parish school nurse. She was here almost daily. Now we have 4 kids in our parish that are severe diabetics so they have hired a second nurse. They work very closely with the school. Both PE teachers, the principal, the secretary, and myself were trained to help her test her blood, inject insulin if necessary, and how to handle a crisis with her. I found a great book (actually from a rec. on this site, I believe! :D) that I read to the class and it really helped clear up a lot of their questions (as well as hers!) It's called Taking Diabetes to School.
     
  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Jan 17, 2007

    We have one nurse for the district . . . three elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school . . . 1000-1200 students, probably. We've had plenty of diabetic students--and teachers--over the years, and they've all been fine. We have one teacher who is a paramedic and one who is an RN. There are also several teachers--myself included--who have some training/knowledge of the diabetes & insulin usage.

    Anytime we have a student who is diabetic, all the teachers are given a copy of the child's management plan and any information that is needed.
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2007

    One of our educational assistants (teacher's aide) is a registered nurse; she is only at our school because 2 of our kindergarten students have medical needs which require them to have constant medical supervision. As a general rule, we do not have nurses in our schools.
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    We are a private school with no nurse. One of our students has type I diabetes and has been giving himself injections since about 4th grade. He doesn't now (8th) because he got an insulin pump. His mother is a nurse and he would call her before giving an injection to report his number and check the dose with her.
     
  8. Ms.S60074

    Ms.S60074 Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2007

    I am diabetic and I would recommend getting advice from your nephew's doctors/diabetes educator. Make sure he is physically and emotionally ready to begin giving his own injections. Make sure he also knows the proper protocol for injection disposal. When I was in school and the nurse wasn't around, I still went to the office to give injections. As other people have said, awareness is key with diabetes. All the staff should know and how to help him. I actually got sent to the principal's office for 'acting funny and insubordinate' in gym when in actuality my bloodsugar was severely low. This is the age where he might start to want to hide it for coolness reasons. Good luck! :)
     
  9. wi2boston2wi

    wi2boston2wi Rookie

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    Jan 19, 2007

    Thanks.

    Thank you all for replying. I'll pass this along to my brother and his family. I hope it puts them at ease!
     
  10. lteach2

    lteach2 Cohort

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    Jan 20, 2007

    There is a boy in my grade like that (he's 8). The guidance counselor checks on him all the time and he also has a helper that stays with him most of the day, but mainly when he needs to be checked. They check his blood sugar every 2 hours and keytones as needed. They have permission to take him to the doctor if necessary. They have walkie talkies (counselor and helper) so they can page each other as needed. He also has a pack of stuff in a belt bag that he carries with him when he leaves the classroom.
     
  11. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    Jan 21, 2007

    We do not have a nurse in our public school- an aide of sorts that works in health room.

    When I taught 3rd grade in a private school years ago I had a student who had to give himself shots. We also did not have a nurse- not even an aide in the health room. We didn't even call it a health room. It was the office and he went there and the secretary helped him.
     
  12. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    We just had the one parish nurse until my studend was diagnosed. Because she had so much trouble regulating her blood sugar the nurse had to be there every day. She was stationed across the parish and sometimes it would be 45 minutes or more before she could get there. That was what made them decide to hire a 2nd nurse and station her on our side of the parish.
     
  13. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I find no nurse in a school to be amazing (especially liability wise). Wow. That's a first for me.
     
  14. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    My former system had one huge high school, four middle schools, and sixteen elementary schools. We had three nurses.
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Wow, In the almost 40 years I've been in schools of one form or another, I've never been in a school that didn't have a nurse!
     
  16. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    Alice I was thinking the same thing. In the district I work in all 6 elementary schools have a nurse. The nurse at my school is saint with what she deals with everyday.
     
  17. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Our parish (district) has 9 schools total. The larger of the two high schools had a health center added on about 4 years ago through a grant. Before that, we had a school nurse that travelled to all the schools. Basically all she did was do hearing/vision tests, and keep a check on records for immunizations. I really don't think she did anything else. The two that we have now are in the schools and very active.
     
  18. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Again, wow!!

    We had a kid in my cafeteria a month or so ago experience a seizure. While I was closest teacher (just my luck!) the 2nd teacher there was an EMT. (By chance,not design.) But I sent a kid flying for the nurse who called an ambulance and took care of the situation.

    How is it possible that schools -- particularly public schools--don't have nurses? I'm in a Catholic school, and ours is technically employed by the local district.
     
  19. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    We all have an emergency response team. There are 7 on our team, we've all been CPR and defibrillator trained, as well as very basic first aid (seizures, choking, etc). When there is a medical emergency, we all have to respond. (And I thank God each and every day when there isn't one!)
     
  20. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    We have a nurse one day a week. While that is scary enough, what I really dislike is going to camp for three days with no nurse.
     
  21. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Wow- we have SO many health issues in my school (635 kids total enrollment) that having NO nurse would be downright careless!! Diabetes, food allergies, kids with epipens, kids on meds who need lunchtime doses (insulin, ADD meds, etc...), seizure disorders, etc etc....If the nurse is out they get a sub. When the nurse leaves the buidling (for whatever reason ) the nurse at the middle school in town is only a phone call away.

    What happens in a school with no nurse for meds dispensing? Do teachers do it? Are staff memebers trained in CPR, epipen delegates, etc? I am CPR trained and an epipen delegate but I would feel so much better knowing my school nurse is there in an emergency!!
     
  22. La Profesora

    La Profesora Cohort

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    What a liability!!!

    Man, that situation sounds scary! I am diabetic myself, diagnosed at age 8, and I have never attended a school without a nurse. I don't see how, with all the things that can go wrong (epilepsy, diabetes, children on meds, choking hazards, fainting, flu season, and the list goes on...) that they can justify having no nurse. Nurses are not JUST for checking head lice!!!

    My mother told every person in the district who would listen about my diabetes and how to deal with me at all times. She told every teacher, every principal, every nurse, every school board member, and I'm sure I even came out in the paper...

    Since we are all very computer literate here... Google it! Look for the legality, check the district website and policy, contact the board. Your kid's safety comes first!

    Good Luck!
     
  23. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    Czacza, we get a sub too when our nurse is out. There is always someone there for the kids. There are times I even go to the nurse when I am not feeling well.
     
  24. ally06

    ally06 Companion

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    None of the schools I went to or have taught at have ever had a nurse. Some schools do over here but mostly they are the private schools and boarding schools.
    All teachers here are required to have a first-aid certificate and be CPR trained. When kids need medication the school secretaries usually do it not the teachers.
    I had a boy a few years ago who was diabetic (8 yrs old). He tested his levels at morning tea and lunch and wherever we went (playtime, sports, excursions etc) we took an esky with his drink in case he became 'low'. When he enrolled his mum came and spoke to all the staff and went through the procedures with us. These were then written down and easily accessed by any staff member. He was a really responsible kid and knew exactly what he needed to do to control his disease (didn't stop me from worrying though!)
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2007
  25. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    At schools I have been at, any student medication is kept in the office and the secretaries supervise its administration. We have 3 staff members training in CPR and first aid. All of us are trained to administer an epipen and know which students have one. We are also aware of which students have diabetes, epilepsy, and severe allergies and have been taught what to do until help arrives. Our school here are "peanut-free", so that eliminates at least some of the alergy hazards. If any of our students have medical conditions which require constant daily supervision, one of the educational assistants assigned to the school may be a nurse.
     
  26. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    All I know is our district had a nurse let go a few years back for improper medication dosing...scary. I wouldn't want to put my career/future on the line for administering meds- something for which I beleive you should have MUCH training.....(I don't think secretaries should be doing it either.....)

    AMK- I'm in NJ too- I've been in both private and parochial, elementary and HS settings and all have had nurses!!
     
  27. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    The secretary had to dispense medicine, and on field trips, a teacher had to hand-carry any medications and administer them herself/himself. Our three nurses were very good, but they were just stretched too thin to really be of service. Personally, I believe that every school building should be required by law to have a nurse, but back in the day when we did, the administration treated them shabbily as far as scheduling. I can remember when the nurse was responsible for duty, and if she was needed while she was out on the playground, or in the cafeteria, she had to somehow find someone to stand in for her while she ran to take care of blood or broken arms or something-in-the-eye, etc. Back then, it seems as though there just weren't any allergies or such, although I do remember a little girl in my second grade class who had an ulcer. Her mother brought her lunch in special every day, and whenever there were birthday cupcakes, the room mothers made sure that one of them wasn't chocolate.

    I think principals sometimes have a hard time dealing with someone in the building who isn't either teaching, typing, or on duty somewhere.

    In the local system here, they treat the nurses very shabbily indeed.
     
  28. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Gee... we have a school nurse on every campus in our county here in rural Alabama.

    It blew the minds of some Administrators in Sarasota, FL when one of my students moved down there. He needed a nurse due to his active seizures. They didn't believe the mom when she told them we had a nurse on every campus. They basically called her a liar. I told her to have them call our board of ed or call me.

    I would think someone with a medical background would need to be readily accessible if this child's sugar level were to go haywire one day.
     
  29. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Jan 29, 2007

    We NEVER had/have a nurse at our school either!!! I'm pretty sure of he few teachers with basic er training!!! The funny thing is no school nurse, but had to have a nurse to go to camp for 1 week!!!
     
  30. KinderKatie

    KinderKatie Companion

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    Jan 29, 2007

    I live in Delaware and this is on the only state that requires, by law, a nurse in every single school.
     
  31. designdr

    designdr New Member

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    Jan 31, 2007

    reactive airways

    I have had a similar situation; my son has reactive airway disease. One day the teacher called me at home to say that he was having problems. He had gone to the office to receive his medicine and the nurse was at another facility. The principal decided he did not need his medicine! When I got to the school, I could hear him wheezing from the door of the classroom. I immediately gave him his medicine and took him out of school! I then immediately went to the school board and filed a formal complaint. I kept him out of school until there was someone at the school at all times that could give him his medicine! It took a lot of phone calls and letters, but they finally got someone there full time.
    I hope that the school will at least have someone trained to handle his medications, even if the school nurse is not there all the time
     
  32. La Profesora

    La Profesora Cohort

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    Jan 31, 2007

    Today, I thought of this thread....

    A student in the classroom down the hall had an undiagnosed epileptic seizure today. He was talking one minute, then eyes rolled back in his head and he fell from the desk, hitting his head on the desk and floor as he fell. The teacher left him and the class, and ran to the nurse. I heard the girls screaming, so I went to investigate.

    We cleared the room of students, and the male nurse held the students head while I held the student's feet and he shook. Luckily, the nurse knew the position to hold the head and hold the boy so that he did not further injure himself. I wouldn't have known all that the nurse did. The boy was frothing at the mouth and bleeding from the head. He was taken by ambulance to the hospital.

    Thank god for our school nurses. Every school should have one. You never know until it's too late.
     
  33. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Wow! I am at a Catholic Pre-K through 8 and our (untrained, unskilled) secretary makes decisions regarding the diabetics, head injuries, etc. Scary!!!
     

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