Detail lesson plan writing ?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by teachertime, Aug 9, 2009.

  1. teachertime

    teachertime Companion

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    Aug 9, 2009

    I've spent most of the summer collecting lesson plan ideas, helps for novels--character analysis, study guide questions, quizzes, etc. I've even placed all the material in protective sleeves. I feel like I've got all the ingredients for a good soufle, but not the directions on how to make it.

    My question is how much detail do you all put into your lesson plans? Do you use just the space provided at the back of a grading book or do you write complete lesson plans (rationale, standards, procedure, material, assessment, etc)?

    School starts for me in two weeks. It's been years since I taught high school level and then I only taught for a year or so. I'm a bit rusty and trying not to panic.--I've even started taking meds to keep me less stressful. LOL How much time do I need to spend on each grade? Do you write the lesson plans for the whole year or do you just get an idea of what you want to teach for each quarter?

    I've got an overall idea of the novels, short stories, poetry, writing, even vocabulary, quotes for the day, and journal ideas rolling in my head. Just need an idea of how much I should write in detailed lesson plans--each minute of class or just an overview?

    I don't have a mentor nor did I have one when I taught 10 years ago. What I learned from my last experience is to be organized, organized, organized, have a plan for classroom management, and to keep students busy--not just give them busy work.

    Help!!
     
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  3. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Aug 9, 2009

    Different schools and different administrators may require more (or less) detail for lesson planning, but for me, my plans are fairly simple. To give you an idea, one of my plans that I would write would be:

    Topic:
    The Black Death/Plague

    Activities:
    PowerPoint & Discussion, Conclude Encyclopedia Activity, History Bites Video Clip

    Due Today:
    Read Chapter 8, Section 5, Complete Checkpoint Questions

    Due Next: Journal Questions (this is a change!)
     
  4. iluvteachin

    iluvteachin Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2009

    Yes, as PP said - it depends on your administration.

    Mine does not require lesson plans at all.

    My system goes something like this:

    Summertime - plan the general units for the year.

    During the year, I plan 1-2 weeks ahead. I write down in my lesson planner the topics I want to cover and activities. But because I've been doing this for several years now, it has gotten easier to do.

    I would definitely start out with overview for the year, then try to break it down to give you a good time frame.

    Then if you find yourself with too much dead time, try to break it down even further. Really you just need to play with it until you find a system you feel comfortable with.

    It seems like you're teaching English. I'd plan one unit (book/story) at a time so you don't get overwhelmed.

    For me, I generally do the following for one book which takes about 4-6 weeks depending on the complexity/length of the book:

    Pre reading activity (could be author webquest, prediction essay, etc.)

    Read each chapter (at home) discuss in class

    They get homework each night *usually comprehension questions but I throw in analytical questions as well after discussions

    Have periodic quizzes

    Have periodic activities

    Have at least 1 essay during the book

    After the end of the book, a cumulative book review

    Have an essay at the end of the book

    An unit test

    Good luck. If you have any questions, I'd be happy to help the best I can.
     
  5. teachertime

    teachertime Companion

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    Aug 9, 2009

    Thanks so much for the answers so far. I discussed with my husband about doing just what you both have suggested. I do have an overall plan and somewhat of an idea of what I will be doing each week. I will be teaching the grades on a block schedule, which is helpful in that I don't have all four grades every day.

    I luv teaching....I was considering for my 9th graders mixing a short story unit with writing paragraphs and/or short essays (descriptive, narrative, and compare/contrast) between stories. Would that be good idea? I also thought about doing the same, except for a different emphasis essay (persuasive, expository, argumentative, classification, etc.) for the other grades. Thoughts?

    My 9th grade binder is FULL with the short story unit information, writing, quizzes, activities. BUT...I have like 10 things for two short stories--The Cask of Amontillado and same for The Most Dangerous Game. I do know I'm required to show the spiritual director every paper I will be giving to students---that's why I have so much in the binder. I wanted to have her see it all so that if I don't use one particular activity, I wouldn't have to wait for her to view another and have to wait.

    Thanks again for the help and any answers to any future suggestions. You all are the best!!
     
  6. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Aug 9, 2009

    Wow... every paper you hand out to students needs to be reviewed first? I'd go nuts with that... I hand something out virtually every day.

    Anyhow, as for longer term planning. Last year was my first year, and so I generally planned two weeks ahead of time (a unit typically), and would plan out daily topics and activities for that entire two week period. For the entire year I merely created a very rough outline of units I wanted to cover.

    Now though, over this summer, I've sat down with each course and revised everything, and prepared my unit plans for the entire year for two of my courses. Not lessons themselves, but the outline. We'll see how that goes though, because planning that far ahead can cause problems, since, as we all probably know, "the best laid plans..."
     
  7. teachertime

    teachertime Companion

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    Aug 9, 2009

    Not only every paper the students will see, also any pictures (which I plan on using for the compare/contrast essays), movies, audios--like books on tape--and posters or anything for the wall. The school is private and the girls are very limited to what they can be shown--think if you will of Amish/Mennonite societies, in a way. It's about like that in this school. Pretty restrictive. BUT I'm in the the challenge.

    I look at this way. I've been given an opportunity to teach all four grade levels so that puts me in a great way should I not want to return next year to the same school, plus it's block scheduling, which gives me experience in both block and regular. I'm in win-win situation for being better qualified, more marketable in a large city where competition can be fierce for English positions that do become available, especially in teh school districts where everyone wants to teach. LOL... I steadfastly remain positive--it's all good.
     
  8. iluvteachin

    iluvteachin Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2009


    I think it's a wonderful idea. I think the short stories will provide a good model to work off when writing the paragraphs/essays. For example.. something like "The Tell-Heart" would be a great narrative to work with. My students love that.
     

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