Demo Lesson - Poetry

Discussion in 'High School' started by Miss Eileen, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. Miss Eileen

    Miss Eileen Rookie

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    Jan 19, 2018

    Hi all!

    I just got a call to do a demo lesson in a really great district, and I'm super excited! I'll be doing my demo for an 11th grade academic English class. They'd like me to teach a lesson with poetry as my core text for the lesson, and I found out they are about to start a unit with Frankenstein as the main text. The supervisor said they will mostly be looking for my skills with lesson planning, creativity, and engaging the students.

    Since it will be a standalone lesson, I'm thinking it may be easier for me to keep within the themes/genre of Frankenstein.
    My ideas so far:
    • Anticipatory Set - An independent journal-type writing task that relates to a theme/topic of the poem we'll read
    • Main activity - Read the poem as a class, then split the students into small groups to annotate and/or respond to questions that require them to analyze and make real-world connections to the text. Then, we would discuss the responses from each group.
    • Closure - exit ticket? (I feel like everyone does exit tickets for demo lessons though)

    Poetry is honestly not one of my strongest suits when it comes to teaching English, and it's honestly a little overwhelming looking through Google for idea, so I figured I'd come here for inspiration.

    Does anyone have any suggestions for poems that would be good for a demo lesson? Also, does anyone have any general tips for teaching poetry or succeeding in a demo lesson?

    Thank you so much!!
     
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  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  4. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Jan 19, 2018

    I teach Frankenstein and I sometimes pair poetry with it. Take a look at “pity this busy monster” by ee cummings. https://web.cs.dal.ca/~johnston/poetry/pitmonster.html
    You can do a lot with the imagery, discussing why cummings insisted on that particular spacing of lines, etc. He’s an interesting poet!
     
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  5. Miss Eileen

    Miss Eileen Rookie

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    Jan 20, 2018

    Thank you for the feedback! I didn’t think of it that way, but my idea does sound pretty basic if I’m trying to showcase my personality and such. One idea I thought of would incorporate song lyrics, but I wasn’t sure if that might be seen as too far outside of the box for a poetry lesson. Maybe a poem and a song with similar themes?
     
  6. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  7. Miss Eileen

    Miss Eileen Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2018

    I think I've come up with a lesson plan, and I'd appreciate any feedback :)

    Objectives: Students will be able to examine the impact of parent-child relationships;
    identify and analyze the significance of imagery and figurative language to support the author's development of theme and tone in poetry

    Do Now: Students will write their names on a post it that I'll provide and will be instructed to write one life lesson they've learned from their parents, a teacher, a coach, or any other adult role model.

    Instructional Plan:
    1. Review the do now responses and ask probing questions to get to know students
    2. Explain that we are taught many life lessons from the time that we are very young. In the upcoming reading of Frankenstein, you'll explore the impact (both positively and negatively) that parents can have on their children from a young age. In today's lesson, we're going to begin "unboxing" this idea through a poem by spoken word poet Sarah Kay.
    3. Distribute copy of "If I Had a Daughter" and ask for students' prior knowledge of spoken word poetry
    4. View Kay's performance on YouTube
    5. Ask for students' initial reactions to the video: What did you like about her delivery?
    6. Students will pair up and answer accompanying questions about the poem (about 15-20 minutes while I rotate around to check for understanding and provide clarification).
    • Identify and explain the impact of three examples of imagery
    • Identify examples of figurative language and explain their meaning
    • Identify the theme
    • How does the poem's lack of a clear rhyme scheme contribute to the overall theme?
    • Is the poet's outlook optimistic, pessimistic, or realistic? Cite textual evidence in your explanation.
    7. Review responses as a class.

    Closure: Which lesson from Kay's poem is the most important one she will teach her daughter? AND/OR (I'm undecided) Are there any lessons that you think are NOT her responsibility to teach? Explain. Respond on a post-it note, and stick it on the board/door on your way out.

    Any feedback would be much appreciated!
     
  8. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  9. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Jan 27, 2018


    And I thought I went through sticky notes fast!!!!!!! Sticky notes are so expensive too! Good lesson idea though, especially if you end up with a group of kids reluctant to share out in a traditional format.
     
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  10. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  11. Miss Eileen

    Miss Eileen Rookie

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    Jan 27, 2018

    I love this idea!! I have chart paper and plenty of post it notes in my current classroom that I can use. Like you said, this a great alternative to a worksheet. Thank you so much!!
     
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  12. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  13. Tulipteacher

    Tulipteacher Companion

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    Jan 28, 2018

    I googled the poem and the title I found was a little different, so be sure to check that. Also, the poem uses the word "damn," which in my conservative area would raise some eyebrows for a demo lesson.

    Your objectives are about figurative language, theme, and tone, but nowhere in your lesson do you review those concepts. I think you need to be sure to review those and put up definitions. Otherwise they're searching for examples of figurative language but might not remember what it is.
     
  14. Miss Eileen

    Miss Eileen Rookie

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    Jan 28, 2018

    Thanks for the insight! I was confused about the name of the poem too, so I did some searching and it looks like she originally called it “B” then changed it when she did a TedTalk that included the poem.

    Maybe for the Do Now, I can give a half sheet of paper for them to do the Do Now, then the opposite side will be the definitions for the examples of figurative language. Or I can just include the definition and an example of each, then have then define the term as part of the Do Now. Do you think that would be enough of a review?
     
  15. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Cohort

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    Jan 28, 2018

    Maybe you could consider this angle.
    Instead of working on worksheets, students could listen to pop music. Yes, you read that right....listen to pop music. Then, discuss the pop music and relate it to poetry (or write a paragraph).

    Of course, this is part 1 of a poetry unit I designed for mid-elementary.
     

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