Demerits/Progressive Discipline

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by BumbleB, Jul 8, 2015.

  1. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 8, 2015

    Does anyone use demerits and/or progressive discipline in their classroom? If so, would you be willing to share your behavior plan/guidelines?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jul 9, 2015

    I don't know what that means. Can you clarify?
     
  4. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 9, 2015

    Which part? All of it?
     
  5. leeshis0019

    leeshis0019 Companion

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    Jul 10, 2015

    I was actually planning on try this in the upcoming school year.

    Basically, I have a stack of orange slips (a quarter of a paper) that I made in Microsoft Publisher. It includes the normal things (Name, Data of infraction, reason for infraction, etc) along with a picture for the school, etc.

    This is high school mind you so I don't care if their parents see/sign it or not. The infractions are pretty self-explanatory:

    Disruptive & cell-phone out

    Nothing more. These are high school students so I won't give them a slip for missing HW, disorganization, etc. Just for disruption and cell-phone use during incorrect times.

    Punishments:

    1 slip = warning (I don't contact parents here...show trust in the student)

    2 slips = detention with me for 20 minutes; sit and work (email or call home if email isn't preferred)

    3 slips = detention with me for 20 minutes; clean my room (email or call home again)

    4 slips = write-up; include previous warnings/detentions in the write up along with calls and emails home


    I'll keep an excel file where I can just mark the reason, # of slips, etc. Nothing more. I also keep a short record of any calls home. I find it easy to print out a sheet for each of my students that has phone-numbers and emails (AFTER I HAVE ENSURED THEY ARE GOOD) and just write on that.

    The slips "reset" after 4 weeks. And this starts in the first week. So they'll reset on Week 5, 10 and 15 (we are 18-19 weeks block schedule).


    It seems like a lot, but I do think it will cut down on the amount of time I spend on discipline. And of course you have to come up with your own tolerances. My "disruptions" are essentially, talking while I'm talking and ignoring my verbal warnings. The slips are given only AFTER a verbal warning is given.
     
  6. MLB711

    MLB711 Comrade

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    Jul 10, 2015

    All teachers in my school give out warning slips, but they're different for primary, intermediate, and middle grades. Middle teachers give out warning slips for misbehavior, homework, and dress code. Detentions occur with more severe behaviors and once students accrue a third warning slip in one category within a marking period. Slips must be signed by parents and returned the next school day or students get a second slip for behavior. Slips are tracked between all teachers via a Word document in the shared drive. That way we know which student is on track for a detention. For detentions just because of homework, I just have them make up the work and help my clean up around the room or school. For behavior and dress code detentions, I had students write an essay. This year I'll be stricter on the requirements including a research component and increasing length. I teach at a Catholic school so I feel like discipline is more rigorous and cohesive than in the public schools that I've worked in.
     
  7. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

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    Jul 10, 2015

    Let's see if I can remember... I teach high school English.
    Class Rules:
    1. Be on task; participate in all activities
    2. Stay in seat unless you ask permission to get up
    3. No phones without permission; no off task behavior on phones
    4. Keep your area clean
    5. Don't distract your classmates

    These are pretty straightforward rules. Number one pretty much covers everything. I prefer specific expectations as opposed to general rules like "Respect the classroom."

    I have a clipboard that I make check marks on.
    One check: warning
    Two checks: 15 minute detention after school or at lunch
    Three checks: 30 minute detention after school or at lunch
    Four checks (or major discipline issue) Reported to office, parent contact, 60 minute before school detention

    These reset every day, so I can give them a check every time I redirect them. I think this really helps encourage students to be on task and participate.

    During my detentions, I usually chat with the students about their behavior and make a personal connection with them. I also use the detention time for students to sweep my room, clean the board, clean desks, cut things out, or do other little tasks like that. If I know they are struggling with the content, I use the time to tutor them. I give students the option of serving during lunch because some of them have responsibilities after school.
     
  8. leeshis0019

    leeshis0019 Companion

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    Jul 10, 2015

    You let them serve during lunch? Is it the same for everyone? Like 5th period is your lunch and it's their lunch as well?

    The issue I have with this is that I have...no issue. As I was typing this I just recalled that I have planning during the normal lunch block so I can totally get them out of lunch as I don't use my planning time to actually plan, but rather hunt down a working copier or grade.

    Hmmm...might need to tinker with my behavior plan some.

    Edit: Also, do you find it helps to "get to know them" during detention? I am almost ALWAYS busy during detention times with something and I know this year is going to be worse because I am co-sponsoring two different clubs while also [hopefully] asst. coaching cross-country/track.

    Don't get me wrong. I love to get to know them and I usually try to during class (in the off-time) or before/after school as they are always welcome in my room, but during those out-of-contract times (before 8:00 and after 4:00) I'm almost always busy with parents, grading, clubbing, etc.
     
  9. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

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    Jul 10, 2015

    Well, getting to know a student may only take 2-3 minutes... Just asking a few simple questions can go a long way.

    The whole high school has a lunch hour between 5th and 6th hour. I don't usually work through lunch, so I find that I can spend a few minutes talking to them. Sometimes it's difficult during lunch since I just want a few minutes to myself, but last year I had 5th hour for a planning period right before lunch, which was really nice.

    If I have errands to run during my lunch hour, sometimes I bring the student with me (it's usually only one.) and we chat along the way. Many of our students have been trained on how to use the copier since they have to do community service hours for school, so if I have a responsible student, I send him to go make copies for me.

    After school, we are required to offer 30 minutes of tutoring as part of our contract hours. I rarely have students come for tutoring unless they are writing an essay or doing test corrections (the kids go to math tutoring usually. ) so I already have the time technically set aside, so it isn't a big deal to use it for detention.
     
  10. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jul 11, 2015

    Oh okay. It's just steps in consequences, I thought it was some kind of special framework you were talking about.

    I kind of do. I have three rules:
    1. Respect people, property, and learning.
    2. Be safe.
    3. Follow all other school rules.

    My consequences usually follow a progressions, but I make it clear I can jump to any consequence I feel is necessary.

    a. warning
    b. time-out
    c. parent phone call/lunch detention
    d. admin support call
     
  11. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 13, 2015

    All of these are great ideas…thank you for sharing!

    My idea was to do little demerit "stickers" (like leeshis0019's orange slips) on Avery labels. Students would write their name, date, and the rule broken on the sticker. I would then place the sticker on that student's page in my behavior binder. Then I can see, at a glance, how many times the student has misbehaved and what the infractions are.

    I wanted some guidance for consequences (how many warnings until phone call home? how many until detention?) and when the warnings "reset". So far, some great ideas…I would love to hear more if anyone else uses this type of discipline plan!
     
  12. leeshis0019

    leeshis0019 Companion

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    Jul 14, 2015


    What grade level is this for?

    For high school there should be very little tolerance for rule-breaking of any kind. If you give them even just a little leeway they will abuse it and ignore your rules. This is why I'm pretty much just 1-warning then detention: it usually only takes one detention for a student to buck up. There of plenty of students (a minority) that will get several detentions and a couple referrals, but you'll often find they are an issue in other classes as well.

    For middle school students you might want to take the same approach, but reset the measures each day rather than in a 4 week period. I'll give warnings out each day before any detention or referral is given, but I won't jump back to a detention when I should be writing a referral (they've already gotten several warnings and both types of detention). For middle school just reset this each day or maybe each week.

    Elementary school is beyond me. I don't even know if I could discipline those rascals. I love 'em too much. I'm sure you could follow a similar structure, but having visual cues for discipline is important. Like your sticker on the behavior sheet idea, but something on the wall so everyone knows where everyone else stands.
     
  13. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 14, 2015

    This is the single most effective thing I feel has been written on this thread. If you want to stop chronic misbehavior, you have to STOP punishing and start redirecting and teaching. There are numerous studies out now that show that when we just "write up" and send kids to the office, we just create an endless cycle of misbehavior, misunderstanding and neglect for these kids who need us the most. While you may feel that you shouldn't have to teach a high school aged child how to control their behavior, that doesn't mean that the child has ever been taught it or seen it modeled at home. Not to mention the large number of students who act out simply as a way to avoid difficult work or who are struggling with personal issues and just need a moment.

    Now, I know that there are times when punishment isn't an option... when a child physically harms another, etc.... but I wish more teachers would take the time at the beginning of the year to teach correct behavior than just chip away at the students for every little infraction.

    Note: I'm not saying anyone on this thread does this; I'm just talking about teacher behaviors and practices I've observed.
     
  14. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 14, 2015

    Middle school…8th grade specifically. So, getting close to high school age. Resetting at the end of the week sounds good…but then I might have do something a little less "permanent" than stickers. Thanks for the feedback!
     
  15. leeshis0019

    leeshis0019 Companion

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    Jul 14, 2015

    Agreed, but there need to be boundaries. Class still needs to keep moving through the content and you aren't their parent(s).

    I've never actually seen someone send a student to the office for a small infraction, but I know it happens and that's ridiculous. However, if you have given them detention a couple of times while also calling their parents and the like then a write-up is just necessary.


    I think for a high school student (that is someone that is about to embark into the adult world) you can be lenient, but "chipping away" at infractions is just necessary. Of course, when I say "infractions" I mean anything breaking the posted rules. When you say infractions I'm not sure what you mean.

    The rules are there for a reason and just ignoring the fact that they are broken does no one any good.
     
  16. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jul 14, 2015

    This is just me personally, but stickers, a behavior binder, even slips wouldn't work for me. The 8th graders would take their sweet time filling them out, and I probably would have forgotten about it by then. I would lose the slips, and forget to write in the behavior binder. I'm horrible at keeping track of things like that.

    I do have a binder with my seating charts, where I can mark if I've given someone a warning and take attendance, but I've been better at just remembering who has a warning lately (it's definitely easier when behavior is better).

    Instead, I make the students record keep for me. I have a few clipboards around the room. I have a lunch-time academy clipboard near the front of my room and a phone call record clipboard near my phone. If I have someone attending lunch-time academy with it, I just have them sign their name on the clipboard, the date, and the reason why they'll be attending. (sometimes they neglect to put down the reason, but no biggie, I can put it down for them and make it sound much worse than they would have)

    During my lunch academies I may have them do something like practicing raising their hand, getting prepared for class, working quietly without bothering others, or scraping gum if they were chewing gum -- it works as both a consequence and teaches them the appropriate behavior [but I've learned that most kids DO know the appropriate behavior, and it's been modeled for them, they usually misbehave just because they want attention; not that that's always the case, so this covers both of my bases whether they need actual modeling or just a consequence]. I always frame it in the sense that there is a skill they should be learning and practicing during this time. Never as a punishment. (even though it kind of is, let's be honest)

    I have them record their name, date, and the reason they have to call home if they are making a phone call, including if they were able to reach their parent or not. I can check over it later in case the parent wasn't reached (I would know because I have them hand the phone to me after they've explained the situation). Often I simply ask the parent if they think a lunch-time academy session would be appropriate. They're usually grateful that I have a consequence ready, they appreciate the skill-building focus of the lunch-time academy, and it keeps the phone call short and not awkward. [i.e. it's simply: 1. student explains, 2. I add further explanation if necessary, 3. Ask if they think lunch-time academy is appropriate, 4. ask if they have any further questions (usually no, but depends on the parent), 5. say thanks and bye] Sometimes the parent tries to apologize. I remind them that they have nothing to apologize for. Their student is responsible for their own behavior, and just needs some practice to get it right.

    Both of these clipboards serve a record of action I've taken for behavior in my class. I don't generally keep a permanent record of warnings or time-outs. I expect those to be administered as often as needed to keep behavior in control. If all I have to do is give a warning, so be it. I don't care too much about giving too many warnings. It means the kids are learning the appropriate behavior. Time outs are natural consequences because they lose the chance to participate with the class in the activities we do and with their friends. If anyone talks to them during time-out they also get a consequence, so they're effectively made to work independently, which in many cases provides much needed focus time for students who need it (hence why I call it a 'focus desk' instead of time-out).

    Also I only give one warning before a time-out. I reset this each day, since I only have them a period a day. If I've given a student a lunch time detention earlier in the week (I can check the clipboard) I may move to a parent phone call.
     
  17. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jul 14, 2015

    This is something I plan on implementing this year….having students call home and explain their own misbehavior. Often times, I get resistance from parents when I call home about student behavior (sad, but true). I feel like if it's the student who is calling, the parent is more likely to believe them. Plus, it forces the student to face the consequences of their actions immediately, and not at 5:00 pm when I have time to call home after school.
     

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