delicate situation

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Johnjoel, Oct 28, 2008.

  1. Johnjoel

    Johnjoel Companion

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    Oct 28, 2008

    Help - i'm currently a student teacher and one of my students saw me at an Obama rally (she was there with her father). Is this bad? How do I handle this if the subject comes up in class?
     
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  3. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Just be honest--- you like Obama. Make it a point that you did research and this candidate supports what you believe. Stress that your students should do THEIR research and pick a candidate that would support that they believe in. And you can leave it at that :)

    Btw, my students know I'm voting for McCain. Some of them would like to vote for McCain too, others like Obama. I stressed that we were to show each other respect and discuss why each candidate would be good for our country. I made it a point of saying that while I like McCain, in other areas I would normally support Obama. I think alot of people could say the same thing.
     
  4. Johnjoel

    Johnjoel Companion

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    I agree....its just tough because until this point when students have asked, I've kept my mouth shut! I guess I can just tell them that I have a lot of respect for McCain and can understand why people would vote for him...thanks!
     
  5. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I just read an article about this. It said that teachers should appear politically nuetral to their students because it is the teachers job to give an objective view. Since she saw you at a rally she obviously knows who you favor, but I would not try ro make a big deal about it in class. If the girl has questions I would refer her to her parents.
     
  6. runnerss

    runnerss Comrade

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    I don't think it is bad at all. It's not like they caught you at a bar drunk. If you like Obama, then that is your right. Rallies are so you can show your support for the canidate you think it is best. If anything, it shows that you care about this election race.
    If my kids asked me who I was voting for I would tell them. I wouldn't push or argue why I think my canidate would win. I would tell them and move on. Or course, I teach 5th grade and they can't even vote yet and they don't fully understand the whole process. So it really isn't that big of a deal on who I say I am going to vote for.
     
  7. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Why not just remind the students that a person's vote is that person's own business? Hence the term, "secret ballot!"
     
  8. peggy27

    peggy27 Cohort

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    One of my second graders asked me today who I was voting for. I told him I already have and I didn't want to share that.
    I wouldn't bring it up. I am sure if she was there her family is for him too. Don't sweat it.
     
  9. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    I know your pov might be different than what the article said--- I'm discussing the article's idea (not attacking you) :hugs:

    I don't understand why teachers need to be "neutral"--- I think it's a GOOD EXAMPLE to set for our kids by having opinions on things. I think it does more to say "I like this candidate for these reasons..." than saying to our kids "It's your choice!"

    We are adults--- as adults we have to set examples for our students. If we show our students that we're smart adults, it doesn't matter if we share with them our opinion on things. I always follow up such statements as "You should really talk to your family about this..." or "You should look this up online and see what you can find about this topic...". That does ALOT more than not giving an answer at all!

    If we are neutral with our kids, our kids will grow up neutral as well. At this point we can't be neutral with what is happening to our country and I don't want to teach that sort of lesson to any of my kids. Have an opinion, talk about it, but also play fair and don't bash someone for thinking differently. That's the more important lesson in my view.
     
  10. CanadianTeacher

    CanadianTeacher Groupie

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    I completely agree with the above. Teachers are human and the only place we have a responsibility for being objective is in the classroom. If students see you out and about and as a result get a peek into who you really are, you have no obligation to justify yourself.
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    You are absolutely entitled to be at a political rally. Being a teacher doesn't override your right to have political preferences.

    As long as you keep your political views out of the classroom, there's no problem.
     
  12. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Citizenship

    This is not bad. This is good. You are demonstrating to your student the importance of involvement in the running of our country. If it is mentioned in class, use it as an opportunity to remind students that all of us have an interest in our goverment. Tell the student who was there should be proud that her father brought her along to participate and learn. Let the students know they should learn more about both of the candidates.
     
  13. SuzieQ

    SuzieQ Companion

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    Most of my students come from very conservative families. Parents have bumper stickers, signs promoting Mc Cain. Most of the staff feels the same way. And the church and the school oficially take a stand ,yes on prop 8 (marriage only for man and a women) So in this situation I have seen parents try to ask but I feel it is best to stay neutral. My daughter has had teachers discuss their choice in Mc Cain. She attends public. However I want my daughter to make her own mind, I would want her to think on her own. I don't want her to vote like me or her teacher just because [I or they] support a certain candidate. You can discuss both without showing bias toward a certain candidate.
     

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