Defiant Student

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ll1301, Oct 25, 2013.

  1. ll1301

    ll1301 Rookie

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    Oct 25, 2013

    Hello, I am a first year teacher (1st grade) and I am having a difficult time with one student in particular. This student has mild defiant behavior...but it is literally getting worse and worse by the day. If I tell the class to sit in a straight line waiting for a bathroom break, he will be leaning against the wall, if I say no hands on the wall, he will keep 1 finger on the wall. He will slump down in his seat during class to the point where it looks like he is laying in his chair. He will randomly sit on the floor by his desk. When I ask him to do something, such as put his book away while I am teaching, I will ask to ask him 3 or 4 times and he will say in a whining/rude voice "I am" but he wont do it until he is asked another few times. He gets up and talk to other students while I am teaching, and when I tell him to sit down, he will look at me and finish whatever he was saying to his friend, and then I will tell him again and he will slowly walk back to his seat. He stands at the end of the line when we walk in the hall and walks incredibly slow, making sure he is noticed. Today, I asked him to do his work several times, and he got upset and went over to my library and took ALL the books off the shelf (about 200) and threw them on the floor. I had to call the AP to come get him.
    I don't know what to do with this student... he is OBVIOUSLY doing these behaviors to get negative attention and I know that, but he disrupts my class to the point where I completely lose my students' attention because I need to re-direct him. Sometimes he raises his hand to answer a question and I call on him and I compliment him when he does exhibit good behaviors. But lately he is getting worse and worse. It seems like if I don't call on him enough, or give him a compliment or praise him every 2 minutes (literally) he will do some sort of negative attention seeking behavior. I've had him sit at my small group table with me to do his work, and he will slump down in his chair, or crawl under the table, or talk to friends across the room even when he sits right next to me. I have 19 students, and I can't be complimenting him every minute of the day, because I need to acknowledge my good behavior students, but what advice can you offer me about this child?
     
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  3. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Oct 25, 2013

    How old is he? He sounds just like my ADHD GS when he was in PS.
     
  4. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    Oct 25, 2013

    Have him move to the end of the line, or have him stand next to you, whichever is least desirable to him. If he refuses, skip his turn to use the bathroom.
    Make him stand or sit next to you.
    Maybe move his desk to the back of the room and ignore him?
    Don't ask more than once. Just walk over to him and take it.
    When he gets out of his seat, announce to the rest of the class that you expect them to listen to you, not another student while you are teaching. That really has worked for me.
    You can hold his hand at the front of the line. Depending on where you're going, there could be other consequences too.
    I would have removed all the other students to the hall after calling the office.
    What consequences do you have?
     
  5. ll1301

    ll1301 Rookie

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    Oct 25, 2013

    I've moved his color, made him sit out at recess, and written a note home to his mom. It is still getting worse. Do you have any other advice for consequences. And he chooses to go to the end of the line and walk noticeably slower...We will already be halfway down the hallway and he's walked 3 steps.
     
  6. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Oct 25, 2013

  7. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    Oct 25, 2013

    It could be ADHD as Blue suggested. Is there a special ed teacher, guidance counselor, social worker at your school who could observe him?

    In the meantime, don't let him choose. I don't think it's just negative attention. It may be a power struggle.

    Don't get into an argument. Tell him once. If he doesn't comply, then remove whatever gives him the power, whether it's his book or a friend. Take away privileges, such as sitting on the rug with the rest of the class or participating in activities when he doesn't comply. Always be sure to tell him quietly that he can earn the privilege back when he complies. It's hard, especially with the young ones, but it often works.
     
  8. Mrs.Giggles

    Mrs.Giggles Companion

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    Oct 25, 2013

    I'm also a first year teacher, and I have a student similar to yours.

    I just started this student on an individualized behavior plan. I've learned that she is a girl who loves coloring and Hello Kitty. I asked her if she would enjoy coloring Hello Kitty pages in class, and she said "Yes." I use a clip chart in my room (not my most favorite thing), but I have modified the plan a little for her. Her day is now broken up into four chunks. Her and I agreed that if 3 out of 4 chunks of her day end on green or blue, she will get to spend the last 10 minutes of the day coloring her Hello Kitty coloring pages. She can receive one yellow or orange, but no reds. She loves it, and it seems to be working great. Yes, she is using class time to color, but this still outweighs the countless times that I have had to stop teaching to address her misbehavior.

    If I were you, I would just find out what he really likes, and then perhaps create an individualized behavior plan for him. This website will most likely be a great help to you as well. http://www.interventioncentral.org/behavioral-intervention-modification Good luck!
     
  9. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Oct 25, 2013

    Yeah, so the first thing is to figure out why he's doing it. It could be that he's so tired of being corrected and doesn't like you so he's purposefully disobeying, which is NOT negative attention. Or, it could be negative attention as you said.

    An initial question - are you pretty strict as a teacher? Do other kids see you as strict, and do you have other behavioral issues? Reason why I ask is that if you are already pretty strict, one possibility is that you may need to rebuild the relationship a bit. If you aren't very strict and are trying to be nice as you deliver consequences, you may be getting "bulldozed" as we sometimes call it :).

    So, back to the question.

    1) (As I mentioned before) - Are you strict?
    2) How is your relationship with the child? Do you joke and otherwise get along with him when not misbehaving, or is there constant tension?
    3) How does he interact with other kids? Other adults?
    4) How is he academically?
    5) Does he seek attention from other kids through aggression or disruptive behavior, or just you?
    6) How quickly (and easily) does he convert his behavior when you ask? I know he drags his feet, but is there ever more significant non-compliance, or is it pretty much just ask twice and he does it?
     
  10. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Oct 25, 2013

    It sounds like he's very much interested in extracting attention from you, and he'll do anything to get it.

    I suggest you ask him to try just a tiny bit harder, then point out to him when you see progress. This needs to be done often.

    When he puts a finger on the wall, you could say, "I remember when you used to put your whole body against the wall. I'm so proud of you that you are trying to improve. I don't expect you to figure out how to behave instantly, just to get a tiny bit better each day." When he misbehaves, you can act surprised, "Timmy, I thought you'd gotten past this behavior. It's ok if you are slow to learn it. It took me a long time to learn to count in Spanish, but I stuck to it. I'm sure you'll get it soon. You're not the kind of person to give up."

    I also like this blog post on winning power struggles with difficult students.

    One advantage of this technique is that it puts you into a position where you are always searching for improvement to point out instead of negative behaviors to correct.

    Don't get me wrong, you still need to correct him when he's non-compliant. For every correction, you should try to get several positive comments in.
     
  11. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Oct 26, 2013

    I've had that defiant student before. With him I had to find out why he was being defiant. He didn't want to line up to go somewhere? I'd ask him. The answers varied depending on why. Just listening to him and then explaining to him why he had to do something helped him.

    If he thought that something was too easy (or too hard) he wouldn't do it. For the work that he felt was too easy I would have to take a couple of seconds to explain why he had to do it. If he thought it was too challenging he needed encouragement to try it.

    Spend some time getting to know him and what will motivate him. Talk to his parents and find out what he does at home. Build a relationship with him.
     
  12. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Oct 26, 2013

    Who did you bribe in order to only have one student like that?
     

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