Defiant Child

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Guest, Jun 11, 2002.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jun 11, 2002

    I have a student that is extremely rude and hurtful to myself and other students. He is the tpye of child that would spit on someone when they weren't looking...or spit in their face. It has been said that this student was asked to call home during a class to tell his mother that he neded a notebook. During that call, the student did not tell mom he needed a notebook. Instead, he told her that the teacher was picking on him and embarissing him on purpose.
    His mother is the type that will get you fired if you do not go by her every word. I gave this student a zero for not writing his name on an assignment. 15 minuye after school got out, the mother was on the phone trying to get me fired.
    Have any suggestions for future students?
     
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  3. melba

    melba Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2002

    difiant child

    Hello, I know exactly how you feel. I taught Special Education for 4th and 5th grade students with learning disabilities and every year I would get at least one student that was diagnosed with an emotional disability. Was the student you had emotionally disturbed or was this student on a behavior disicipline plan? I have used behavior plans in the past with sucess the majority of the time. Some student's disabilities are sometimes beyond behavior management plans and are refered to an emotionally disturbed unit. Our unit is called MLC unit.

    ps. This is my first time using this bulletinboard . Is there a spell check ? I'm a terrible speller . Sorry.
     
  4. teachergary

    teachergary Guest

    Jul 12, 2002

    Behavior modification

    First thing to do is establish a baseline of the bad behvior (number of times it occurs) during a certain time block ( 1hr, 2hr, 3hr). Then introduce some type of positive reinforcement (a kind word, more free time or something that you know this student really likes) when he does not act out the bad behavior during the time block (could be only 10 min). I actually used real money because I was so desperate to change a bad behavior. After graphing the bad behavior for one week (establishing baseline during time block)), introduce the positive reinforcements that you have decided on when ever he has acted appropiately during time block. Do this for one week while graphing the number of times he does not use the bad behavior. Compare both graphs and see if there is an improvement. You should use time blocks of about two hours when recording the behaviors, good or bad (up to you). Also, sit him down and explain how the other person feels when spit on. I have a drastic strategy if nothing is going to work, let me know. Your Friend in Combat, Gary Morris
     
  5. Christy

    Christy Guest

    Jul 12, 2002

    Boy does that sound familiar! I've had a few "Angels" like that along the way. The thing that has helped me the most is my notebook. I keep a small bound notebook with me all the time. Everything that happens gets written in that notebook. Anytime there is a problem the notebook comes out as documented proof of what happened. I will make copies of the pages (blacking out sections not about their child) and they get to see exactly what happened. This usually takes a lot of the problems away. In the one instance that it didn't I finally had to ask our superinitendent to sit in on a meeting with the parent (she had already contacted her school board member). Mr. M, our sup't is wonderful about his support of teachers and he backed me 110% (my principal didn't). The mother was never pleasant, but she backed off. Good luck!!!!
    Christy
     
  6. lindalou

    lindalou Guest

    Jul 13, 2002

    Do you really always keep your notebook with you? That is such a good idea for documenting and I have been looking for an easy way to do it! I also wanted to add I get help from www.disciplinehelp.com for my more interesting students...
     
  7. teachergary

    teachergary Guest

    Jul 13, 2002

    document everything

    Absolutely the right thing to do, document evrything in writing in case of problems later. Also, you sould notify your immediate supervisor that there may be a problem developing. Put down times and the behaviors in question. I have ten rules that are just for such situations. I'm trying to transfer them to this web-site but don't know how (attachment to an e-mail, it won't let me), there in a folder in my e-mail......Your Friend in Combat, Gary Morris
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jul 14, 2002

    Do you have an easy way to document? I either take up a lot of class time or forget at lunch/after school. I think carrying the notebook/pen around is a good idea -- do you have anything better?

    I'm sure you can copy your rules here. Just get yourself ready to post your message, minimize this, go highlight your rules and click copy (under edit), come back here and click paste (also under edit). I look forward to reading them!
     
  9. 5leafclover

    5leafclover Companion

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    Jul 16, 2002

    I had two very special little darlings in my class last year that I had to keep constant documentation on. To give you an idea, one of them called my asst. an F'ing B (insert explitives) on the first day of school. Keep in mind he was a Kindergartner. I put a long piece of masking tape on my arm and wrote three things on it 1)DNC (for did not comply with a directive) 2) Hit (for being violent towards another student) and 3) Outburst (for any unusual outbursts like cursing or screaming. Whenever he did one of these things I would write a tally mark on the tape, redirect him and then get back to teaching. When I had a break I would keep more detailed anecdotal notes on an index card about each tally mark. One index card for each day.
     
  10. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Jul 16, 2002

    What a great way to keep notes! I always find that fooling around with a piece of paper or note pad can be quite a nuisance. But your method will always be right at your fingertips (pardon the pun). Thanks for sharing a great idea.
     
  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jul 18, 2002

    Another idea for documentation is to use those sticky note pads (eg post its). They keep talking about these at uni. they are small enough to fit into a pocket and you can write individual instances down with enough detail to jog your memory when you come to write them up properly.

    SOmething else that they have mentioned is to create, with consultation with the child, a list of inappropropriate behaviours or similar. Just a couple of major ones that you want to focus on. Talk to them first about those behaviours and the results of their actions... stick the list on their desk using clear contact. If they act up on one of the identified behaviours put a small mark next to it using a marker pen (keep a record for yourself in a book if you like.) At the end of the day it may be necessary to talk with them briefly about how they went, particularily if they did better than the day before! The marker can be wiped off at the end of the day so the student starts off again fresh the next morning.

    I don't know if these work in practice. The uni lecturers make it sound like they do so, if you use them, can you please let me know how it goes? Thanks!
     
  12. MAndr3

    MAndr3 Guest

    Jul 23, 2002

    I would probably be considered in the category as the mother in the first post. I teqch Spec. Ed. in the same county my son attends. He is autistic and has cerebral palsy. We had to hire an attorney because the county we live and work in-said that if we did not agree to place our son in a residential school they would take us to court. My son has behavior problems but it is due to his disability. I got a phone call form the school he attended last year saying that he was misbehaving at scholl and wanted to go home. I asked the head teacher what he was being taught. She also said that he wanted his grandmother to be at the house and could she be there. Again, I asked what this was teaching him. He had been at school only 15 minutes. We found out that his teacher did not even have a teacher's license. Sometimes children act out for specific reasons, there is trouble at home or maybe they aren't getting enough attention at school. I would recommend talking to the student and then maybe setting up a contract with him
     
  13. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jul 25, 2002

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