DEAR time dilemma!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by Ali, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. Ali

    Ali Companion

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    Aug 4, 2005

    For those of you who do DEAR time (Drop Everything And Read), how do you make your students accountable for their reading? I have read comments before about students journaling after finishing a book. However, I teach 5th grade and it may be several weeks before a student finishes a novel. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
     
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  3. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Aug 4, 2005

    They could take notes after they're finished reading for the time period allowed. They could write what has happened so far, important events, questions they have, and predict what will happen next. If something happens in the book that relates to their lives, they could write about that.
     
  4. teacher62604

    teacher62604 Companion

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    Aug 4, 2005

    Thinking...They could keep a reading log. Every day they have to write down how many pages they read during D.E.A.R. and 1 thing they learned. (It could be what a character did, something about the plot, anything!)

    [​IMG]
     
  5. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Aug 4, 2005

    If your school has AR there are downloadable reading logs. My kids are required to maintain their logs accurately, they receive a small grade (they don't know it's small!) on it. That way they are testing on books they have just finished, not ones they read a month ago. If you don't have AR, let me know and I can scan and send one to you.
     
  6. SimplySue

    SimplySue Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2005

    We have daily reading logs that go home for signatures from parents. Why not make one for DEAR time in school with a place for pages read and a noteable fact.
     
  7. teacherlissa

    teacherlissa Comrade

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    Aug 4, 2005

    My students have a reading response notebook. They read at least 1 hour a day independently and they have to respond at least 3 times a week. Students will develop their comprehension skills much faster if they think about their reading and responding is a perfect way to increase their thinking. These are the types of responses I look for in their notebooks (I have this on a poster):

    How to respond to a book

    You may do one or more of the following:
    · Make a connection between the text and yourself.
    That reminds me of…
    That made me think of a time…
    I can relate…
    · Make a connection between the text and other text.
    This part is just like…
    That reminds me of…
    I read another book where…
    · Make a connection between the text and other things you know.
    That reminds me of…
    This is like…
    I know about this…but I didn’t know that…
    · Write about the character(s), events, or setting.
    · Write about something you learned.
    · Write about how a character made you feel.
    · Write about what you like, dislike, what seems confusing, or unusual to you.
    · Predict what will happen next.
    · Describe or draw the image the text created in your mind.
    · Describe a main character’s personality
    · Explain the strategies you used
    connections, mental images, inferring, questioning, synthesizing
    · Ask questions about the text.

    If there is anything you think about while reading, you should feel free to write about that! You can’t be wrong, so take risks and be honest.
     
  8. mrs. dub

    mrs. dub Companion

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    Aug 4, 2005

    I do individual book conferences. I'll ask the student about the mian diea, favorite characters, predict what will happen next, have them read a paragraph and explain what's going on, etc. I just make sure they are comprehending what they're reading. It's a pass/fail grade for my class (I teach 6th and 7th).
     
  9. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Aug 5, 2005

    teacherlissa- Good idea. I'm going to make a poster like that. Last year I had a hard time getting some of the students to respond, even though I gave them the basic layout. I would often write a response about a book we read together. I'm scaling down on how many responses I require. I required 5 a week, or however many days we went to school. I would check 5 notebooks a day. The students knew when they were due. I had it posted on a bulletin board, along with when I met with them for Writing Workshop. It was just too much for me to grade every single one.
     
  10. Ali

    Ali Companion

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    Aug 5, 2005

    Dear Teacherlissa-I loved your ideas and think they will fit in well in my classroom. Much thanks! Ali
     
  11. darzie

    darzie Companion

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    Aug 5, 2005

    Along with some writing activities that have been mentioned above, my kids BEG to do the following activity.... After 20 - 30 minutes of DEAR time, the kids get together on the floor with their books. I pull a number from the "number can" to select a student to share. That student sits in my rocking chair and shares what he/she read. They are required to show the book, tell the name, author, and summarize what they read. Sometimes I ask them one question to answer (like those listed above). Afterward, the "listeners" can ask them questions about their book. After they're finished, the "sharer" pulls a stick from the can and another student comes up to share and discuss. Each day a different number of students share, so they kids never know if they will be selected or not. This helps to keep them accountable. You wouldn't believe how this activity gets kids interested in others' books. They love this activity for some reason.
     

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