Dealing with rude students...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Kaley12, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. Kaley12

    Kaley12 Companion

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    Feb 15, 2013

    This is a bit lengthy, but I would greatly appreciate any advice.

    I was wondering if anyone had any advice for dealing with rude students. I've been teaching for a few years, but this is my first year in a high school. Two of my three classes are very enjoyable, but one of my classes (grade 9) has a handful of boys that are often quite disrespectful.

    This isn't to the extent that it warrants being sent to the office, but it's getting to the point where it's very frustrating and makes me really dislike being in that class for the period.

    For example, the 5 or 6 boys that are being difficult are good friends and talk frequently and are very disruptive. I have a seating plan for the class, and made sure these boys are spread out. They will come in to class and try to sit next to each other, and when asked to move to their proper seats they complain loudly and make comments about how its stupid they can't sit together and make it out to be some horrible injustice. (They basically overreact to little things).

    Another example is when they were given an outline for a report they are working on, there was a section that stated spelling/grammar would count. Several of them began to (loudly) moan about how that's stupid because this isn't English class and it's unfair, etc.

    So like I said, these aren't huge ordeals, but it's several times every period, and it's also done in a very rude tone. I don't want to over react to the situation (they also seem quite defiant/defensive and I think it would quickly escalate), but I also don't want to put up with these comments and complaints all semester long.

    I was thinking that it's happened frequently enough now that maybe a few phone calls home would help? Any other advice would be greatly appreciated :)
     
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  3. Jayneorama

    Jayneorama Rookie

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    Feb 15, 2013

    Do you have a discipline plan in place? If I were in your position, I would, without saying a word about it TO them, begin enforcing my discipline policy that covered such behavior. Don't give them room to argue, just consistently enforce your policy and let it be the big meany.
     
  4. Kaley12

    Kaley12 Companion

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    Feb 15, 2013

    Thank you for the response! Could you please give an example about not saying it to them, but just enforcing it?

    I do have ground rules that I've covered on day 1 and stuck with. But when it comes to this, I'm a little thrown because it's not something huge but it's very frustrating because of the fact it happens so much. If it was once in a blue moon a student would grumble about something, then fine. But it's to the point where EVERYDAY these few students find something to complain about. I feel like it really affects the tone of the entire class.
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Feb 15, 2013

    I think one of the toughest things to deal with is when a student does something that is disruptive or annoying, but it's at such a small scale that we feel that we can't really give a consequence, because it's not the same as the 'regular' stuff we have to deal with.

    If you've been giving this students warnings already, you've been flexible and reasonable and tried to ignore it and the problem didn't go away, one thing you can do is treat the little stuff as the big stuff.
    For example: criticizing your lesson and saying that it's stupid = disruptive and disrespectful.
     
  6. Jayneorama

    Jayneorama Rookie

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    Feb 16, 2013

    Here's an example. If you give daily participation points that are a part of a student's grade, then you can simply look down at your seating chart/post-it pad/whatever you have, and make a small notation whenever one of the boys is rude. Or if you have the parent phone call already in place in your plan, and they have met the criteria, no need to warn - just call their parents and tell them objectively how they met the criteria, and tell them that this is their son's consequence.

    If you don't already have a plan like this in place, it is never too late to introduce and enforce it, if you think it would work for you.
     
  7. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Feb 16, 2013

    I would greet the students at the door before each class. When these boys come in, I'd quietly tell them that I'd expect them to go straight to their assigned seats and stay there. When they call out or get disrespectful, I would calmly but publically, announce that disrespectful words and tones will not be accepted and that this is the class' last warning. After that any movement to seats, talking out, would be a private conference outside in the hall or after dismissal. Followed by a detention.

    If the detention didn't seem to work, I would call home. Some schools require a call home before detentions, however.
     

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