Dealing with negative attitudes from coworkers

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Speechy, Aug 6, 2011.

  1. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2011

    Hi! I'm new to this board, and although I'm not a teacher, I am a speech pathologist, and I work in public elementary school.

    I apologize in advanced if this is not the correct forum to be posting this in. It was between this one and Teacher Time Out, so I wasn't sure which was appropriate.

    I've worked at the same school for only one school year, and it was my second placement. I enjoy the work, the students.... everything! My case load is not overwhelming, but enough to keep me busy. However, last school year I began to encounter some resentment from other teachers and fellow staff. I'd like to get a bit of perspective on the situation from actual teachers.

    The problem that I'm facing is that I don't have to do any of the other duties that the teachers have to do. Things like staying after, mandatory meetings, lunch duty, morning duty, etc. A lot of times when you are contracted with a school, there are responsibilities that are given to you (sometimes without pay). However, my situation is different because I am working underneath a placement company. Meaning, I am not contracted by the school. Since the school isn't signing my checks, I cannot be asked to full fill any of the duties I would if I were contracted by the district. :whistle:

    While this is great for me (and no added pressures or unpaid duties) it is causing some animosity between myself and my co workers. I'm one of the two only SLPs in the school, and unfortunately, the other SLP is not contracted by a company, but the school, meaning that she has morning duty, and had to volunteer for Spaghetti night from 5-8 pm unpaid. All of these things in a series of other duties, mostly volunteer.

    It's getting a bit awkward because that SLP, and several teachers have made it clear that they don't feel like I am carrying my own weight. It's very difficult for me because I would love to be on friendlier terms with my coworkers- Every time I sit in the lounge or go to pick up students from their classrooms, I feel a lot of tension. It's not apart of my imagination, because I have had many a rude comment shot my way, in my earshot. It's SO frustrating. I am a young SLP and I hate that I am in the center of such a strong resentment. I feel like I'm not in the "club".

    I feel so silly for harping on it- I should be focusing on my kids and how to help them and cater to their needs. Instead, I'm caught up in all of this work related drama, but I feel like it is affecting the way I do my job. I try to be an upbeat person, but this tension is really wearing me down. I hate how others feel as though I'm not doing my part or doing less than I should. I'm not a saint, but I do care about the school and my kids.

    I posted here to get a fresh perspective. My SLP friends say that this is typical when you are under contract, and to just ignore it. I've considered transferring out, but I do love the school and the kids. Also, I can't predict what things will be like once I start school again (still on break now) but I'm already dreading it. If it's anything like this last year, it's going to be pretty tough.

    I hope this post doesn't come across as teacher bashing- not at all! Not all teachers at my job are treating me poorly, just a large group. II just wanted some advice on how to handle this situation.

    Thanks and excuse the late post! I'm a night owl! :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2011
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Welcome! Your situation sounds a lot like our SLP. I'm the special ed teacher at my school so I work fairly closely with the SLP since we share a lot of kids. She is contracted by the district and only works at our school two days per week. She does not have things like recess duty. She technically doesn't have to come to things at night since our school isn't "her" school, but she voluntarily comes to them anyway, even if it wasn't a day she was assigned to our school. She came to the school plays, concerts, dances, and volunteered at our fundraisers. She also made an effort to fit in socially with the staff, coming to happy hours and things like that. If we were doing dinner or something before a night school thing, I'd call her and invite her to meet us. The district decides what schools she works at from year to year, but she begged them to let her stay at our school because she was able to feel like a part of the school community even only being there a couple days a week. I'd suggest that you try some of the same things she does. Just because you don't "have to" show up to afterschool events or things like that doesn't mean you can't volunteer to do them anyway. Knowing that you're volunteering would definitely be well received. As for staying late, don't you have IEP's and things like that to work on, or things to prepare for your groups? It may be that the other teachers don't realize you're doing this work somewhere else (home?). Maybe you could complete some of the work after school if you're worried about how you're being perceived, or just casually mention that you prefer to do extra work at home. The SLP and I usually stay after school together to work on IEP's or plan meetings, or even collaborate on strategies for specific kids since we share a ton of students.
     
  4. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    So, in a nutshell, your job requirements are different than that of the other teachers and they are resentful toward you because of it.

    You have to decide whether working in this environment is worth the free time or if giving up a little free time here and there would be worth having better relationships at work.

    If you decide you are entitled to the free time, let it go. Even if you move to another school or district, you'll likely get the same cold shoulder. People, especially teachers, have an innate sense of "fairness." Sometimes we don't mind doing something extra as long as everyone has to do it! lol Just be friendly, and perhaps offer a helping hand when possible to as many people as possible.

    If you decide you'd rather try and become part of the "club" sooner than later to ease tension at work, then volunteer for some after school functions! Also, it would be MUCH appreciated, I'm sure, if you could take someone's duty responsibilities occasionally. Look and listen for times when someone is just not having a good day, has to leave early, or is not feeling well and offer to take their duty that day. I know that alone would have a BIG impact on our staff!
     
  5. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I agree, queenie!

    Although you and the administrators, know that your status is different from the other SLP (and the other staff), I'm sure that everyone doesn't know, or understand, that. All they see is a staff member who doesn't have to do everything that they do. You know you aren't slacking, your administration knows it, but your colleagues don't. Volunteering to take on a couple of those extra responsibilities, particularly during stressful times like when everyone is writing report cards, would go a long way.
     
  6. tchr4evr

    tchr4evr Companion

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    Aug 6, 2011

    People who are negative won't like you, no matter what

    If it really bothers you, then try to volunteer for some things. BUt, frankly, people are going to be negative, no matter what. I'm in the opposite situation. I am a contracted teacher, do whatever I'm asked, plus I run the after school drama program, (with no pay) and do tutoring. People don't like me because they think I do too much . . . Kids would rather spend time with me than them.

    Damned if you do, damned if you don't.
     
  7. GAteacher87

    GAteacher87 Companion

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    Aug 6, 2011

    I'd like to touch on a couple of points tchr4evr made. First, there will definitely be people who are negative no matter what you do. Just do your best and put in the effort for the kids and, like other people have mentioned, if you decide that you would like to take on other things, do it (if not, that's okay, too!). You do what you know you are supposed to be doing and what is best for your students; if what is best for them is for you to fulfill your contract and to have a balanced life in return and the only way for that to happen is for you to leave at x time, trust that that will be your best option!

    Also, it is very interesting when teachers complain that someone else does too much. "You're making us look bad!" they say. Why would anyone who is in education truly for the students NOT appreciate someone who is dedicating his/her time to them? Strange animals.
     
  8. Marci07

    Marci07 Devotee

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    Aug 6, 2011

    I've been in both situations. My first couple of years of teaching, I was a single mom and couldn't stay after school much but did a lot of work from home. I would constantly hear my coworkers making comments about how they couldn't imagine anybody being an effective teacher without spending a lot of hours after school.

    Since now my daughter is older and I have a husband to help me out, I can spend more time after school tutoring or doing extra duties. It looks like this intimidates some teachers as they feel that my extra time is making them look bad. I've had teachers approach me and accuse me of being a "bad" mother for spending about 1 hour extra after school on an already short school day. Even spending this extra hour allowed me to pick up my daughter from her school on time. I also had one teacher who literally pulled me to the side one day and warmed me to stop tutoring my students for free after school because it made them look bad.

    It looks like either way, you may keep some teachers unhappy so I would do what best works for you.
     
  9. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

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    Aug 6, 2011

    Speechy this situation sounds similar to the SLP at my school. He kind of just lets it roll off of his back. There is nothing he can do about it. We have talked about it and he says that he tries not to worry about it because at any point he could be transferred at the end of the year to a new school and at any school there will be problems.

    I agree. Everyone will have something to complain about with anyone.
     
  10. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Aug 6, 2011

    Speechy, your situation sounds like our OT and Pt arrangement... although our SLPs are district employees (same union and salary scale as teachers, because they ARE), we are part of a special ed coop, and that's where our PTs and OTs come from. We've been lucky to have the same OT in the district for YEARS, same for the PT... the OT has kids in all 4 schools in our district, the PT has 5-6 different districts she visits. Their time in our buildings is very short, and very scheduled, out of necessity.

    Obviously, they don't have duties, because they're rarely in the building for those times... not to say they don't take kids straight after they get off the bus and work with them first thing, or have lunch with a couple kids to work on sensory-type things or whatever while they're eating... they just aren't "official" duties, if that makes sense.

    I kinda feel the same way you do about MY job... last year was the first time my building has had PreK classes... and, for the first month of school, I had no kids. I was busy doing other projects (both for the school and the program) but wasn't teaching. I didn't get an afternoon class until January... and I had no classes on Mondays or on Friday afternoons (Mondays were playgroups and screenings and stuff, but they didn't necessarily recognize that... Fridays would have been playgroups but no one bothered to put kids into it). Because I am always involved with getting my students to and from their cars, I haven't had other duties. I usually leave early from lunch staff meetings to go get my PM class, and don't have the team to collaborate with every Tuesday at lunch like I'm supposed to (but I eat in my room that day and work through lunch, so I figure it's the same thing; if people wanted to collaborate, they could... and my SLP and i often did).

    All the rest of the teachers saw was a small class and quite often no students in my room (preschool doesn't meet on half-days, or whatever)... I think they resented that a little. They have NO idea how much work goes into preschool.

    I made an effort to go to the luncheons, parties, socials, etc. that the school holds. I can't always make 'happy hour," but I make it a point to go to as many of the "social" things as I can, at least for a little while. That really seems to have made a difference. Some of the previous posters have had some really good advice about volunteering or help other teachers occasionally, even if you don't have to. Probably they don't understand the difference, and may not care to understand it... but by seeing you're also a team player, that can go a LONG way.
     
  11. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Gosh, that is so horrible. Do they not understand that you are a contracted employee or do they just not care?

    I don't think it would hurt for you to volunteer to go to a few activities and help if you can. And kill them with kindness. Go in that lunchroom and be nice. Ask about their kids and family. It's difficult for people to continue to be mean and hateful when they are constantly faced with a positive attitude.
     
  12. Marci07

    Marci07 Devotee

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    This is so true. That's how I dealt with these teachers and it works. Even after a teacher tried to intimidate me to stop tutoring after school (she was an older lady and I wasn't scared at all of her) I made a point of always saying hi to her and asking her about her day. I would also use humor a lot with her. She didn't bother me afterwards.
     
  13. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    You know, maybe this slp could volunteer after school, but she shouldn't have to do so in order to be treated kindly at her workplace. We have a similar issue at my school. Teachers judge others all of the time based on things they know nothing about (in this case, the others really don't understand whos the slp is employed by and what the expectations are for her time). And that irks me. I wish everyone would do their job, enjoy their co-workers, and not question what others are doing - as long as it isn't harmful to kids or imposing on other staff.

    Here's the story from my school: we have one teacher who is constantly late. Teachers are supposed to report to duty at 8, kids come in at 9:15. This teacher was usually arriving by 8:30, 8:45. Other teachers fumed. They complained to the principal, who listened calmly to their complaints and always responsed, "how does this affect you, your job or your students?" Well, it didn't. And they didn't know the whole story. Turns out that this teacher had some major money issues and had her car repossessed. She was relying on public transportation to get her to school, and the nearest bus stop is about .8 miles away, so she had to walk from that point, with all of her teacher stuff, in all kinds of weather. The principal knew this and decided to cut the teacher some slack, but the teacher was embarrassed and asked that the p not tell anyone else. The only reason I know is that the other teachers took the issue to faculty council, and I am the president of the council.

    Now, granted, this is a very different situation. But I think everyone should always consider, before becoming angry at other teachers for things that don't even affect them in the least, that there may be other factors in the situation that they know nothing about.
     
  14. Good Doobie

    Good Doobie Rookie

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    I hate it when coworkers who teach from behind their desks come to me with their negative attitudes. But I will do all I can to stick up for them because I like to be friendly and besides I do see that most of the money wasted and problems come from the administration. I also hate it when good teachers complain and before I had a family I would defend them to the point of losing my job or quitting.
    It really amazes me how many times the administration is influenced mostly by the teachers who try to find ways for everyone to teach from behind the desk.
     
  15. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2011

    All these responses have been so helpful and nice! Thank you kindly <3

    So, I don't know how to quote yet, but I'll answer as many questions as I can remember.

    Staying after school- Normally, although I have paperwork to be done, I have to leave school as soon as it lets out. During the school year since I have a few hours in the late afternoon free, I pick up various home health care jobs. So I'm out the door at 3:10 at the latest and in my car, on my way to those sessions. That's why I knock out my paperwork during my free periods or after I get home.

    Volunteering- I'd like to do more, and I probably could if we had more weekend stuff. Last year I signed up for the relay race and I was told they had enough volunteers, even though I heard that they were short. To be honest, I didn't press the issue, just tried to be nice and offer a helping hand. I tried to put my name out there, just in case they thought I was being standoffish or unfriendly. I mean, I haven't volunteered for much, no, but the things I have offered to do they haven't taken me up on. This coming year I'm determined to do more, so I'm going to try to sign up early.

    Quite a few of the teachers who are giving me hell are the ones that know I'm contracted, as does my fellow SLP. I apparently was brought up at a meeting (one specifically teachers only) and few asked why I was not participating or could not be brought in for lunch or bus duty. I think this was brought up because a head teacher asked me to fill in for someone else on bus duty, and I had to politely decline due to my other jobs. I didn't explain that I was contracted, because as a head, I assumed she knew. I realize now this was foolish, but at the meeting the reasoning was explained. However, that didn't stop the bad tension or the back lash.

    I try to put in my part in other ways- I participate in fundraisers (as a buyer), do Christmas/Easter/ birthday gifts for the kids, and I helped out with staff appreciation week. I know that teachers have so much stress on them right now, what with pay and budget cuts, and last year everyone was so tense because jobs were on the line. Sometimes I feel the resentment is apart of that, because maybe it seems unfair that I'm doing less yet I don't have the risk of losing my job. It's a shame because we have such fantastic teachers at the school who are being treated so awfully (although, I'm certain it's that way everywhere).
     
  16. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    Wow! Quite a few of you seem to have me at your school, lol.

    I feel like maybe I should elaborate more on why I'm feeling bullied by my coworkers, mostly to just to convince myself that I'm not paranoid and all of this isn't in my head. However, seeing as I am biased (haha), I know that there is a good possibility that I am being overly sensitive and taking comments the wrong way.

    I was in the lounge room one afternoon and a teacher (who is close friends with the teacher I stated above) was carrying a full load of boxes. I offered to help, and she replied, "Oh, that's okay girl! When you're a Princess you don't have to do anything but sit around and look pretty!" There were several people sitting in there having their lunch, so a lot of them laughed. After that incident, that's when the "Princess Grace" comments started up. Now, none of these comments have ever bee said maliciously or in a serious tone, but usually one of joking and mocking. The name doesn't bother me as much as the intent does. A few weeks later someone was ordering out chinese for lunch. She went around the room and asked everyone, except me, and then said, "Princess, I'd ask you, but I'm sure you wouldn't want some boring old rice." or something like that.

    Another day I was having lunch in there alone, and a teacher came in and sat down. It was pretty awkward because no one else was in there. After a while she asked me if I could hand her her diet coke from the fridge, since I were closer. I got it for her, and as soon as I did she said, "I'm sorry! I forgot we're not supposed to ask you to do things like that." And I did not even know this teacher! After that, I stopped eating in there, it was enough for me.

    Once again, there has only been a handful of Princess comments, but they are usually said in front of everyone, and it's kind of embarrassing. If the goal is to humiliate me- I can understand. I just don't like the implication that I'm doing less, when I do care. UGH. So frustrating!

    I haven't signed up for home health care sessions yet- Part of me wants to start volunteering and doing more things to make friends and to prove I'm doing my part. The other half wants me to say "screw them", and drive by the school and stick my tongue out the window to the head teacher who does the bus duty (LOL- so juvenile but nothing would give me more pleasure) I'd love to have friends that I could lean on at work, but I'd be happy with some common ground and less teasing and hostility.

    So am I being too sensitive? Do they mean those comments maliciously or are they just joking with me?
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2011
  17. Opal

    Opal Companion

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    Oh boy. I don't know the right protocol, but I'd definitely say something to the administration, as well as the offenders.

    This sounds like bullying at it's finest.

    Start documenting these comments. It is unprofessional, demeaning, and just plain mean.

    I'm thankful that my coworkers aren't jerks.
     
  18. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I definitely think I would feel hurt/like an outcast if people were making comments like that to me. It's just plain rude! I agree with Opal. Document and try and find someone to talk to about it!
     
  19. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    This goes well beyond negative attitude and is clearly bullying. I'm so sorry. Your admin needs to know.
     
  20. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    This is my thought exactly. You coworkers are harassing and bullying you. You need to bring this up with both the school administration and whomever you report to outside of school.

    On the flip side, you could come up with some snappy retort about having left high school behind you years ago.
     
  21. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    This may sound naive, but I never encountered this in high school! I think that's why I'm having trouble knowing what to do, even though I'm in my early twenties.

    I might just make the comment anyway. Thanks mmswm! :D

    Okay, thanks for confirming it for me. If three of you think it's bullying, then at least now I have some relief it's not all in my head.

    The only problem I'm facing now is that I don't think I can report it, since it was last school year. I'm going to document what I can remember just in case I run into trouble again.

    Work starts again soon- I'm just going to play it by ear. If it continues, I'll definitely be going to admin.
     
  22. outsidethelines

    outsidethelines Companion

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    Aug 7, 2011

    I'm sorry you are having to deal with these "mean girls"...who are teachers no less! You would think they, of all people, would know better.

    If it were me, I'd go in with a positive attitude and not dwell on it, which may continue the tension. But if it did happen to start again, I would definitely have some snarky comments to make in return to put them in their place. Maybe they don't know your situation (not that it excuses their behavior...) and just assume you are getting special treatment for some other reason. I have no idea if the speech pathologist at my school has to do any extra duties or not so it could be ignorance on their part.

    Also, try to seek out someone positive in your school to befriend to make things a little easier on you and possibly speak up on your behalf. And definitely speak to admin if it does not improve. You have a right to not be harassed at your workplace. Good luck!
     
  23. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Yikes! I didn't realize that kind of behavior is what you meant- after reading that I'm not sure I'd want to be friends with those people! If I were you, I might just forget it. However, if you're wanting to ease some tension, maybe just mention that you have another job to go to after school? Personally, I don't like to stay after for long. I like to go to the gym before dinner and in order to do that I need to get out at a reasonable time. I don't know that people actually notice and/or care, but I always got a little nervous about people noticing that I never stayed late. I made sure to just casually mention that I prefer to take my extra work home so I can get to the gym and then do work later on my couch in my sweatpants. It might be silly, but it just eased any fears (however irrational) about people watching me leave and thinking I'm lazy.

    I think a lot people also just don't understand the job of an SLP either. Any time there was an IEP meeting scheduled, people would automatically come to me with questions about it even though at least half the time it was one of our SLP's meetings (since more kids are on speech IEP's that academic ones). When I told them that I wouldn't be attending and that it was the SLP's IEP meeting, they looked at me like I was crazy. Many of them didn't even realize that she also had to write IEP's and run meetings (for over 75 kids). Classroom teachers often also don't realize all the work that goes into planning small groups all day- they just assume it's easier because you don't have a whole class. Nevermind that we often have to teach 15 different lessons in a single day, there is no independent worktime or time when the kids are just taking a test etc., and we can't use the same curriculum/plans year after year. I definitely had some people at my school who seemed to think I had it easy because I didn't have my own class. 1 teacher was always asking me to do extra things during the school day because "she knew I had extra time." I had to politely explain to her that my entire day was scheduled for teaching, and that I could help her after school if she needed it. However, I am good friends with several teachers at school and I know they have my back, so Mrs. ___________ making snide comments about my "extra time" or "how nice it would be to have 3 kids at a time" didn't seem as important. Is there anyone at the school that you feel close to, or could work on becoming closer to this school year? Our SLP and I are really close (this past year was my 1st and her 2nd) and she was just telling me the other day that having such a good friend on the staff made a huge difference in how much she was included/got to know everyone else. I was sort of her "liason" for the rest of the staff.
     
  24. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2011

    See, if someone told me they didn't stay after school because they wanted to get home so they could go to the gym or go get on the couch, I would think, "Good for them!". Hah, but apparently not everyone shares the same thinking. I'm sorry that you have to even mention your plans beyond school at all. I feel you there.

    I honestly can understand why they think that way. And a lot of times, I do have free time. I don't have nearly as many kids as your SLP does (I have 41 currently) and I feel like I have my hands full. However, I think very intently on the best route to go with each child and their individual needs. I'm not with my kids for very long, so sometimes I feel like it's hard to make that big of a difference. But I'm sure everyone feels that way when dealing with children, like there's not enough hours in the day to really focus on them.

    My hats off to teachers, because I could not imagine getting in front of a classroom every day and staying there for eight hours, then several after school just to plan out lessons. And on top of that 5746464359832 duties. I feel so terrible for the other SLP because she has to do twice as many duties for less of the pay. She hasn't made as many snide comments, but I can see how she is probably feeling the pressure. I've made myself available to her, tried to extend a hand of friendship. Hopefully this year maybe we can talk more!

    Oh, and I just love the SpEd teachers, although I don't work closely with them as you might think or as much as I may like. We only interact when it comes to discussing certain students or during meetings. Part of this reason is because a new building has been added and certain classes have been moved. I'm still in the main building with the regular classes unless I venture over there to pick up a student, but normally they are already waiting for me.

    I wish you were at my school waterfall! I'd love to get close with another coworker, or just have someone to eat lunch with. It sounds lame, but I feel so lonely at work.
     
  25. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Our SLP has the same duties as teachers (attend mandatory bi-weekly staff meetings, weekly grade-level collaboration meetings, yard duty responsibilities, etc.)
     
  26. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    The other SLP does those things too! She was hired on directly from the district. I, however, was not, so the school cannot ask me to do those things.

    The only meetings that are mandatory for me are the ones dealing with my kids only or IEP. I don't go to any of the collab meetings or staff.
     
  27. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Aug 7, 2011

    Speechy, I'm a night owl as well as you can see by the time I posted this! :) Nice to see another speech person here (see my post to you in the Introductions section).

    It's tough to be the ONLY type of person w/ your job on a campus. I face that & am used to it as well having been a resource specialist in the past. There's only 1 of those types of teachers on any given campus too, just like the SLPs, so I know how isolating it can be as it is. At my dist, the SLPs work for the dist & are not contracted by a different company, but they still don't have all the yard, lunch, bus duties, etc. that you're referring to. I'm sure some teachers resent it a little, but they get used to it. I'm sure they'd gladly choose to stay being a teacher if they had to be in your shoes for a week & see all the IEPs, assessments, & paperwork you have to do! And of course working w/ the students too.

    When we're in such an isolating profession (when we work in a school setting anyway), yes, it's great to get in there & make friends, etc., but if people don't like you & they don't even know you or want to get to know you, that's definitely NOT your fault. All we can do is the best we can. Show people how friendly & welcoming you are & that's all we can do, we can't make people like us unfortunately.

    I know some SLPs who don't like eating lunch in the lounge because all the teachers want to do is talk about their little Billy or Amanda, etc. who may need some assessment for possible speech or ask what needs to be done w/ a language problem a student seems to have, etc.. The SLPs don't want to talk about speech on their lunch breaks, they want to relax too!

    Can you pick 1-3 other teachers or staff members & possibly invite them to your classroom to eat lunch so they can get to know you on a more personalized basis where there's not 20+ people altogether talking noisily in the regular lounge?
    How about also possibly befriending the other staff members who are the only types on campus too? I know an SLP where the RSP teacher & 3 SDC teachers all have lunch in the SLP's rm most of the time, so they have their own grp going.

    Just do your best & be friendly, that's all you can do! :)
     
  28. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

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    Aug 7, 2011

    Speechy I just read the princess comments that you posted. That makes me so mad.
    Girls can be so mean and catty. I'm not sure if this has anything to do with it but the first thing I thought was is your looks and style of dress. Could they be jealous of you in this regard and not necessarily have anything to do with your job responsibilities?

    The only reason I say this is because we had a new teacher come to our school last year and lets just say she is a fashion type girl. She wears something new almost every day and had the accessories to match and she was extremely pretty. Once she stepped in the door I noticed a lot of negative behaviors come from other teachers. Without really getting to know her.
    Well she ended up transferring to another school this year. Not sure of the reason why.

    Just thought I would bring this up.
     
  29. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2011

    Ms. I- I'm SO happy you are a future speechie! How are you liking your program so far?

    I'm also aware that it's not all schools that assign duties, even if you are contracted. I'm not even sure if the majority do or if it is just the minority, but so far it's been my experience. I had actually been warned by my professors in grad school that something like this could happen and that there would be resentment. But going under contract enticed me, because it had a better hourly wage, top notch insurance, etc. I just couldn't say no and didn't think there would be consequences.

    Since I've received negative attention, I've been weary about approaching anyone with the intention of making friends-but I realize that I've got to put myself out there this upcoming year. Thank you for the awesome ideas Ms. I! Now it just boils down to me doing them :)

    VanNewbie- they are mean comments. It's not like I'm being called "princess" in a friendly, endearing way, but more like they are poking fun of me. I don't like other people thinking that I'm spoiled but at the same time I've realized a long time ago that sometimes what other people think is out of your control.

    I do try to dress nice. I put on make-up, maybe some jewelry here or there (that is minimal). I went through a pretty rigorous grad program and we were taught from day one to dress our best! I got so caught up in that routine that I've kept it going.

    Eh, I feel uncomfortable walking around with the idea that "people are jealous of me". It may or may not be true, but regardless I don't want to run to that reason every time someone doesn't like me, when I may very well be the problem. But really who knows. All I know is that I'm trying and I'm not trying to make myself out to be better than anyone else. But I have a suspicion that that's another reason as to why I'm getting the cold shoulder.

    I'm not trying to shoot down your idea though! I have thought it for a split second, because at first I noticed the main ones who were picking on me were the older teachers. But it's not just them, so it can't be an age thing. The SLP I work with is around 30 and several teachers my age are not too friendly.
     
  30. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Aug 8, 2011

    Speechy, I just started my 3-yr prgm in May & I'm taking my 3rd course so far. I'm liking it. This course I'm taking now is my 1st tough one...Lang Disorders II :dizzy: I go to one of the California State Universities, but it's a COMPLETELY online program, so thank God I don't have to set foot on campus until graduation day. (The drive to the school from my house is an hr or a tad more.) My 4th class starts Aug 22nd...observation in comm dis. All the classes start/stop on staggered dates & they're anywhere from 8-15 wks long. We were warned that it's a pretty rigorous prgm! I knew it would be harder than the 1st time I went to grad school...I have an MA in Special Ed, 2 teaching credentials, & got my SLPA license the end of last yr. Maybe, if I have some really tough questions & have nowhere else to turn, I can PM you or we can even exchange email addresses & I can email you sometime about things if that's alright. Don't worry, I won't bug you! :D

    I'm like you. I've dressed well my whole life. I like to wear makeup, jewelry, etc. I, too hate thinking that people are jealous of me. The ultimate thing for us to remember is that we're there to do a job, nothing more, nothing less. If we can mk friends, fine, but if we can't, we're not going to cry about it. After all, we could care less if we're in the popular clique, etc.

    Have a great yr!
     
  31. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2011

    Ohhh yes. I remember those days *groan* Although I did not complete my masters online, in class is very stressful. I was told that undergrad would be a cake walk compared to what awaited in grad school, and that was no joke! There are times when I had three projects going, next day, all day clinicals, paperwork for those cases, and a test all in one week. Getting into the program was competitive, and I still felt like I had to prove myself once I was in. It was a truly hectic two years, but once it was done, it was done!

    But it's not all scary- you have a long, fun road ahead of you- it's a wild ride for sure.

    And you seem to have it harder, since you're taking your program online. I just do not have the discipline.

    Yes! If you have any questions or need any help, feel free to contact me through PM and we can go from there. I have various study tips that have worked for me and they might just come in handy. I'm pretty much a dork and love to talk about speech therapy, so you could never be a bother to me :)

    Edit: Oh, and thanks for the perspective on the drama at work. You're right, it's about doing your job and what is best for the kiddos. I'm not fond of the bullying or whatever it is, but I can't let it affect my work.
     
  32. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Aug 8, 2011

    Well thanks! One of these days, look out for a PM. I remember when I was in grad school before for special ed, I was student teaching a 6th gr class M-F & working a part-time job all at once...& I was at the point in grad school where I was working on my essay questions & having to memorize them for my comps exam. So I had to research my 8 ques & memorize a total of about 25 typed pages of info. Then, I went on campus for 2 Saturdays, 4 hrs ea day to type it all out from memory. If you didn't pass, you had to wait another yr around. Glad I passed the 1st time & I'm glad I decided to do the exam & not the Master's project or thesis.

    But, now that I've switched gears to SLP, the anatomy/physiology are THE TOUGHEST classes I've ever taken in my entire life! Audiology's a close 2nd. I'm dreading my 7th class, which is Neuroanatomy & Neurophysiology of Speech, Lang, & Hearing!!! :eek::dizzy: At least it's not until Jan-May 2012.

    If you want to PM me about anything at all, free free too.
     

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