Dealing with issues privately

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by otterpop, Jan 6, 2015.

  1. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Jan 6, 2015

    It's said in several educational books that, in the consequence hierarchy, dealing with problems privately should be the first option. Most recently, I've been reading Fred Jones' Tools for Teaching book:

    "Level 1 Small Back-up Responses: quietly warning the student that they are acting inappropriately. Success here lies in the teacher’s ability to hide their intent to the class and as such allowing the student to “save face” so as not having to “react” to the teacher’s admonitions in front of the class.

    Jones recommends using what he calls “ear warnings” where as the teacher is working around the room, they will quietly warn the student that they are misbehaving and that if it continues, further repercussions will occur."
    http://jonestoolsforteachers.wikispaces.com/Responsibility+Training

    What is the best thing to do when I am talking to the class, though, and a couple students are off task or talking?

    It's obviously harder to address this privately. Typically what I'll say is something like "I'll wait until all eyes are on me / everyone is listening respectfully", but that's still not really private as everyone knows whom it is directed toward. Another option is to give a quick task, and wander the room to see how students are doing and quickly talk to the kid, but this isn't always possible with the lesson flow. What do you do?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 6, 2015

    I am a strong believer in the quiet warnings. Even so, if I'm doing direct instruction in front of the whole class, I will call out kids publicly. "Ladies, stop talking. I need your attention up here." Usually that's enough. If not, and if the behavior is preventing me from teaching or preventing my students from learning, I will stop class and ask the offender to step outside.
     
  4. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jan 6, 2015

    Sometimes it's hard to deal with several students privately, even just with one. If I'm standing up front, explaining things etc. I can't just stop and walk up to the student to whisper to him privately. It wouldn't even be private anymore, I would bring more attention to him because now I stopped my lesson just to deal with him.

    I mostly use nonverbal clues. Stop in the middle of the sentence and look at the student who's talking almost always works. Sometimes just looking at him, slowly shaking my head or making a silent shush sound by putting my index finger to my lips also works.
    When I walk around during reading or when they're workng, then I can deal with them privately.
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jan 6, 2015

    And yes, I do call out public ally if I'm up front but I'm speaking in general, I don't name names.
     
  6. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Stopping mid-sentence is a good one. Just halting enough to get attention, without having to specifically call out a behavior. I use nonverbal cues often, but sometimes in a whole class situation, the "offending" kids aren't looking up.
     
  7. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Jan 6, 2015

    I love Fred Jones. I also agree with private warnings because it doesn't usually evolve into a power struggle. I think stopping in the middle of the sentence and just staring at the students is the best way. It usually gets attention and other students get irked at the distracting student. I've done it a few times in a row when I student taught then stopped talking all together. We weren't allowed to send students outside since our classrooms led outside and not into a hall, so I had some trouble with some disruptive students. He also talks about proximity and "working the crowd."
     
  8. miss-m

    miss-m Groupie

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    From the front of the room I usually call it out, though without names if possible (Something like "I need voices off, please.") or I just say their name and put my finger to my lips or shake my head while making eye contact. If I'm walking around I tap on their desk as I pass by and that usually gets their attention without me having to stop whatever I'm in the middle of saying.
     
  9. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

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    Jan 7, 2015

    Proximity works great. I would often not stop talking, but slowly walk towards the offending students while continuing my lecture, and just stand there and lead the class until they stopped talking, then slowly return to the front of the class, or continue to walk around.
     
  10. MissMae

    MissMae Rookie

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    Mar 7, 2015

    I give a look, if the talking doesn't stop then I just pull up Dojo and take a Talking Out of Turn point. If after that it continues I send them to Timeout chair for a few minutes. If it continues after that, Buddy Room. They usually stop after the Dojo, they dont want points taken away!
     
  11. misswteaches

    misswteaches Companion

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    Apr 27, 2015

    I think I read that book while I was in teacher's college! :) I guess I use a few different strategies -- and it depends on the student.
    - Pause and give eye contact. Kids are on the edge of their seat when you stop abruptly in the middle of a sentence.
    - Give a general reminder. "I can finish giving instructions when it's quiet."
    - Proximity. As others have said, this is a great tool. I try to avoid standing in the front of the classroom whenever possible. I'm almost always walking around, or at least changing positions in the room every once in a while. A meaningful look at the student while you are right next to them can work wonders. :)
    - Name-dropping. I'm not sure where I read this, but some book said that if you say a child's name quickly in the flow of your sentence, that child will be the only one who really notices it. Obviously this doesn't work if you say, "The next concept...WYATT...deals with how plants get their nutrients." It's more like, "The next concept, Wyatt, deals with how plants get their nutrients." This sort of flies in the face of the privacy approach, since the child's name is right there for everyone to hear, but I really do find that nobody notices except for the one child. It's not totally private, but it's a good backup plan as it's far less obtrusive than most strategies tend to be.
     
  12. prealgebra-nerd

    prealgebra-nerd Rookie

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    May 8, 2015

    I am always a big fan of proximity. I try to walk around the classroom as much as possible, so I can make my way toward a loud/misbehaving student and simply tap their desk or give them a private stern look. This seems to be much more effective then calling them out in the middle of class.
     

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