Dealing with apathy

Discussion in 'High School' started by a teacher, Sep 26, 2015.

  1. a teacher

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    I used to think of apathy as kids having an openly bad attitude. Now I'm starting to realize that the following also fall into it:

    Not turning in assignments
    Not listening to directions
    Not following their grades online
    Lack of energy or enthusiasm in class

    I find that, just like a performer, if I don't have a good audience (all I need from them is a little energy), it's hard for me to teach in an engaging way. That is, with enthusiasm myself. When I say hello to a kid and they don't respond, or when I make a funny or sarcastic remark about something, and the class is quiet, I think, "Boy is this group booorrriiiiinnnng!" What experiences have you all had with apathy and what have you found helps YOU (the most important person in the classroom) get motivated? I have considered some games I learned from a theater teacher years ago that actually would get kids out of their seats and moving, but they are not practical on a daily basis.
     
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  3. Jeky

    Jeky Comrade

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    I think it's more a matter of mindset. When I first started teaching, I would take those kinds of things personally. Now I realize that it most likely has nothing to do with me, and that there are so many factors in a student's life that can contribute to the things you mentioned. It's my job to reach out to them and figure out how to get them engaged in school.

    I've had the most success with:
    - Build those personal relationships. Get to know the whole child and not just the student.
    - Set boundaries. Be empathetic yet firm.
    - Humor. Don't take yourself too seriously.
    - Find activities that promote inquiry and student thinking...step back and them figure things out instead of being the "expert".
     
  4. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Yes! I agree with this. There are so many reasons a kid may not be following their grades online or doing homework that have nothing to do with the teacher. But if I know I've planned by best lessons, I do get disappointed when they don't want to participate.
     
  5. a teacher

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    Yes, I know it's nothing personal. What I'm addressing is the lack of energy in the room. It affects my mood and sometimes frustrates me to the point where I want to start being sarcastic about student laziness or incompetence. In order to avoid this and to keep my energy and enthusiasm, to run better lessons, I need to see energy and motivation from them. That's why I'm wondering what techniques I can use to get them moving.
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Each class of mine has a different personality. Some has better energy, some has less, but that doesn't mean they're better or worse. Usually when they're quiet, stare at me the whole time, not too much participation but they follow all directions, and I wish they were livelier, I ask myself: what else do you want? They do everything you expect!

    Here's an example of my classes:
    1st ELD: very small class, students often come in late, so I often don't start instruction until 15 minutes late. There's no point in teaching 2 students and the rest catching up in 15 minutes. They can be fun, and easy going, but lately they get too relaxed and now I have to tighten things up. They have good energy, and can be fun, but not my favorite class by all means.
    2nd English: very small class. a little chatty, but easy to control, they participate, they play around too much with each other in my opinion, but they're mature and we always get everything done on time, even early. I like them.
    3rd English: biggest class. My favorite. You would probably say they're boring, they're quiet, obedient, not everyone participates, but they're everything I want them to be. I don't think of them as boring though. They do listen to what I say and care about their learning as well as grades.
    4th English: bigger class, lots of different personalities here, and I have to be on my toes. Some problems here and there. My least favorite. Definitely not boring, I wish they were lol.
    5th English: bigger class. Lots of personalities, more chatty, but I really like them. More participation, they do care about their grades, etc. Also more mature. I still like 3rd per. more, this class requires more energy.
    6th: CAHSEE English. Small class, nice kids (I have them in my other classes), good vibe and they listen. They do participate, they're pretty good.

    Overall I like them all, but they're all different. Being quite is not always the best, just as participating and having a lot of energy is not either. I just take what I get and try to keep order, so they can learn :)
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 27, 2015

    Failing s test or two due to not paying attention might snap them out of their attitudes. Raise their level of concern: notebook checks, pop quizzes, exit tickets, extra points for participating.
     
  8. leeshis0019

    leeshis0019 Companion

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    I had a class like this last year. First day, 15 kids in the class. I was used to 30. Half of them were seniors. Man I thought I was in for a nightmare not for behavior, but because seniors are...well...seniors.

    The first week I built up the class. I kept them on their toes. I gave them time to talk with each other, but also kept them busy. We did "fun" activities (things teachers find fun, but the students find tedious because they can't be on their phones).

    I also talked with them. I joked with them. I am a generally quirky teacher and I always made a point to point that out.

    Now this was a small class and they were very well behaved. With a bigger class that isn't so well behaved I'm not really sure you could do quite the same thing, but trying to get to know your students usually helps them open up and become more active. Also, relating the topic to something in their life. I teach Chemistry so it's sometimes very difficult, but I always tried to do a demonstration that would liven them up and get them somewhat interested. I could always go back to it "Hey, you remember when we...".
     
  9. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    In Tools For Teaching Fred Jones advocates Responsibility Training with Preferred Activity Time. Instead of the teacher managing RT and PAT the students self-manage. The teacher merely awards time - time to do a preferred activity. Motivation to turn in assignments, listen, check grades and increase time on task comes from the peer group. This gets the teacher out of the performer role and enforcer role. Some high school teachers brush off PAT as too "babyish". Yet I recall a high school AP class who increased their productivity and cooperation just so they could play their favorite PAT activity, Heads Up Seven Up.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 28, 2015

    There are administrators, especially given the demands of high stakes test and rigorous standards, who don't view PAT as valuable use of teacher-student contact time. Just something to keep in mind.
     
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  11. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

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    Sep 28, 2015

    I totally understand getting frustrated with the apathetic students. I teach 2 sections of sophomore English and 2 sections of junior English. I also teach 2 sections of honors sophomores, but that's in a different field.

    My sophomores are fantastic. Only 2 out of 46 students have a D; everyone else has a C or above. Of all of my students and all of the homework assignments, only 5% are missing. Their class is pretty rigorous, but they appreciate that they have time in class to finish homework (why the completion rate is so high), and they are motivated to turn everything in.

    My juniors overall have bad attitudes. Of my 30 juniors, 10 of them have a D or F. Over 1/3 of their homework assignments are missing.

    Every two weeks, I make a schedule with all of the activities, homework assignments, quizzes, and test dates for that unit. I passed out the schedule to all of my students today. Several of my juniors threw them in the garbage, and one said, "Why would I need that?" On the other hand, one of my sophomores thanked me for making the calendar and several others around him agreed.

    I teach my classes the same way, with the same structure and enthusiasm. But I am starting to get frustrated with the juniors!
     
  12. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    No doubt. I suspect some administrators experience a mild coronary when observing a class learning under the guise of having fun. It's almost always due to a lack of training in what to look for. The fact a teacher could produce more learning and faster by using a preferred activity is in juxtaposition to the myth learning only takes place via "bop till you drop" lesson delivery with sparks flying from students' pencils.
     
  13. a teacher

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    This rings true for me. Maybe they are waiting for real pressure to wake them up out of their clueless daze.

    Another idea I had was to concentrate on the serious students whenever you're getting fed up. Just ignore the goof-offs and let them fail or whatever until they get serious and cheer yourself up by interacting with the good kids by discussing their work in depth.
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I don't think many teachers offer academic/learning activities for PAT.:2cents:
     
  15. Peregrin5

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    In this particular case, I believe that treating the symptoms addresses the systemic issue. When you make sure all kids are watching you and are actively engaged in listening (i.e. pencils down, eyes on you, zero talking) they are more likely to understand the instructions.

    Apathy is one of those self-fueling cycles.

    They don't care, so they don't listen, so they don't get the instructions, so they don't do well, so they like the class less, and that makes them care even less because if they cared about it, they would be so deep in the pit, they would get depressed.

    Making sure they are engaged, and having procedures that force them to participate (i.e. calling on them randomly, not accepting 'idk' for an answer, ensuring that everyone's ideas are valued even if they're wrong or not) helps them to realize some measure of success. This helps them feel better about the class or subject which makes them care more, hence reducing apathy.
     
  16. Peregrin5

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    I have great respect for Fred Jones and his ideas, but PAT was one thing that I didn't agree with.

    Some kids respond to stick and carrot methods of behavior management, but many kids, particularly those who are apathetic, just don't buy into it. I personally view it also as wasting class time (depending on how you use it) because you could replace general fun activities that don't have any subject relationship to genuinely fun subject related activities.

    We do lots of fun labs in my class. I guess we have a form of unofficial PAT, because if we don't get through the set up or the other work we do, we don't have enough time to do the fun lab. So that's naturally occurring.

    But PAT also to me smells of whole-class consequences, which I also whole-heartedly disagree with.
     
  17. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Of course not all strategies will work for all teachers but this is what I do and enthusiasm is certainly not an issue in my class:

    1. I greet every single student with a huge smile and an enthusiastic "good morning!"
    2. Before I go over the bell work I tell them I hope they had a great morning/weekend.
    3. I speak very loudly (naturally) and move around the classroom constantly
    4. I make a few jokes throughout the class period
    5. I consistently use their names or teacher names in problems and questions.
    6. During individual work when I circulate the classroom I make small comments to students- "did you get a haircut?", "I like your shoes", "you've been doing so well today", etc.

    As for turning work in- our school has a program in place that will take kids out of an elective course if they are failing one or more of their core classes. While it's motivation enough for most kids to turn in their missing work, some kids have to get pulled and they do their makeup work during elective time.
     
  18. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    There are always kids, for whatever reasons, who might not buy in to PAT. Many teachers have at least one such student. Omission Training is the element of PAT often left out or not aware of in the first place that offers up an incentive few students can pass up. Implemented correctly a student would likely be at war with authority and peer relationship to continue to try and ruin PAT for the rest of the class.


    "Depending on how you use it" is key. PAT was not designed to replace instruction or to stop goofing off and talking. It was designed as part of Responsibility Training due to research which showed a lot of instructional minutes are lost due to transition and other procedural problems. Teachers who use PAT correctly have been able to gain 30 minutes per day (a lesson or practice period) which was lost previously. In other words, done correctly, kids show up on time with proper materials, are on task before the bell rings, pass and collect papers without wasting time, rarely ask to go to the restroom or get a drink, move to and back from groups quickly and other "hustle" stuff all so they can play Basketball - the test review game the teacher was going to use for review anyway.

    Exactly. Fun lessons are always better than boring ones. Jones has never suggested a teacher stop teaching interesting lessons. What many teachers do is merely use the fun lesson they planned for as the PAT. In this case the teacher is using the incentive, PAT, as motivation to hurry up with all the class chores which typically rob time to teach the same lesson sans PAT. Over 50 teachers have posted on-line learning related PATs they use to teach, review and introduce content in their grade-subject area.

    There is no punishment element in PAT. No names up in lights, no one loses recess, kept after school/detention, referred to the office or time out, parents called etc. There is a "penalty" component which, if used correctly, amounts to nothing.

    Have you been trained at Jones' seminar or been involved in on-site training? Reason I ask is your remarks are consistent with someone who has heard about PAT from someone or read about it. It took me four tries before PAT started to work as intended. And I had been to Jones' training twice in addition to a support group on-site.
     
  19. EdEd

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    Taking the easy route here, but I do think it depends on why your students aren't engaged. I guess that's sort of the question you're asking, but also the one that sort of needs to be answered before you get to the strategy phase.

    Like some, I think that some level of artificial reinforcement (e.g., PAT) can be helpful, but probably in the sense of motivating academic enabling behaviors - probably not in changing underlying motivational structures or deep engagement.

    As an example, if the issue is that the content of the lesson is boring, PAT (or other reinforcement) might prompt sitting up straight, looking at the teacher, and even some work completion. However, it may not work to get kids actually excited and passionate about learning.

    On the other hand, if the content and delivery are riveting, but you're dealing with mild off-task behaviors, something like PAT may work well.

    On your quest to discover why kids aren't engaged, I'd encourage you to look past the obvious, and try to honestly assess your instructional environment (rather than proving to yourself that "it's not you" - not getting the sense you are, but that's a trap we all tend to fall in :) ). For example, "effective" delivery isn't just a yes or no, but involves multiple dimensions, all of which could be breaking down and causing the rest to malfunction - pacing, opportunities to respond, language complexity of your delivery, etc. Even within those topics, you could subdivide and get even more specific.

    What ideas to you have as to why the kids aren't engaged?
     
  20. a teacher

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    Unfortunately number one is most definitely not an option for me and I'm sure completely a non-option to most. You are obviously naturally perky. It would be easier for me to smile or get all excited if I saw enthusiasm from them first. When I open the door and they're standing around looking deflated and bored and after I say hi or good morning they say nothing, that gets on my nerves. Happy kids get my energy up right away however.
     
  21. a teacher

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    I'm passionate about my course content, I do move around the room a lot, I do call on students whether they raise their hand or not, and I play music in the room. I have noticed that they get easily confused on multi-step directions. Toddlers learn early on how to add steps to tasks, i.e. get the toy, put it on the table, get another toy and put it on the floor, etc. These kids are often clueless.
    Now I'm starting to deduct points from their grades when they aren't following steps correctly. One needs to apply pressure in various ways to get responses to directions.
     
  22. a2z

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    I'm sorry you are again having problems with students and behaviors.

    We expect performers to perform enthusiastically regardless of their audience and regardless of how they feel inside. Same goes with teaching.

    I bet it would be easier for their needy emotions if you were the one to provide enthusiasm first.

    I wish I had any advice different than the others have already provided, but anything I would add would be shot down as you needing from them first.

    So, I did want to say, you are probably stuck with the situation you have because you are claiming you can't provide the enthusiasm without out them providing it to you first. Seems you are all in a vicious cycle and since it seems the students are in control of this enthusiasm train, it is going to keep riding down the same tracks unless you intervene and give them the emotional fuel they need.
     
  23. EdEd

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    So it sounds like you've ruled out some things that you do NOT think are the issue. What areas would you identify as being more problematic - not just in terms of the behaviors demonstrated (e.g., not engaged), but the cause of those issues?

    In terms of the multi-step directions, do you feel that difficulty in that area is due to skill deficit (they CAN'T follow multi-step directions) or motivational (they probably could, but they just aren't choosing to)?
     
  24. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Again, it seems that the OP is expecting the students to provide the classroom atmosphere. The OP finds it difficult to teach without the students motivating themselves.

    This seems to be a recurring theme. Lots of good advice has been offered on this thread, and others.
     
  25. Peregrin5

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    I've read Jones' Tools for Teaching and used his techniques frequently, though I've since switched to Michael Linsin's techniques (though many of the core ideas are similar). I used to use PAT but it didn't really work for me. I don't think I'd get much out of it, because I don't really lose any time to any of those things you mentioned.

    I remember there were a lot of things here and there to make PAT work, but it just seemed like so much more work than just keeping kids accountable. My Middle Schoolers didn't buy into it. It was a lot of annoying record keeping for me, and I didn't really feel like it was teaching them responsibility, and instead teaching them that you should only work properly if you get a short term reward for it. I get that it works for other teachers, but I think my own philosophy on it is at odds with the technique.
     
  26. HistoryVA

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    How in the world is smiling and saying "good morning" a "non-option to most"? That's just basic politeness! Do you not smile and say good morning to your coworkers? :confused:
     
  27. MrsC

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    I wondered the same thing. While I may not say an individual "good morning" every day, I am in the hall when the students enter and say "good morning" or "hi" to every individual or group as they enter. I certainly don't always feel bright and perky, but I can't imagine not greeting them.
     
  28. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Do I always feel "perky" at 8:15 on Monday morning? Nope. Do I fake it as best I can? You bet. And by the time the first few kids are through the door, I really do feel happy to be there. It's been shown that just the act of smiling can actually make you feel better. I would recommend giving it a try.
     
  29. GeetGeet

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    I want to think that A teacher is dealing with problematic students, because I am an art teacher too and I so want him to be successful. However, it appears that you, A teacher, will not take responsibility for your role as the person who controls the "energy" of the room. Please read on and hear me out, because I am not trying to be condescending, I just feel like you are having the same issues over and over, and to me it's sort of clear what's going on. SO MUCH depends on the energy of the teacher, and based on your posts, your energy is not all that positive toward your students.

    Of course, students have their part, but they are young, not fully socialized and do not have the self-awareness we do--this is just due to their psycho-biological stage in life. Therefore, they wait to get cues from the outside more than adults do. When the outside cues give them negative energy, they respond in kind. As teachers, we have the responsibility of understanding where these people are in their development and dealing with it firmly but with compassion. They need a reason to act better (firmness), but also need to trust the environment (compassion). That's the way to get students to actually trust you as a person who knows what they are talking about--and who also actually cares for them. An inviting smile or attitude and knowing their names is key to gaining that trust. You don't even have to be bubbly. You just have to clearly give a ****.

    A teacher, I believe that you do love your subject and want students to love it too. But, you need to look outside of your own emotional/intellectual bubble (and I say that with respect because I have been in your shoes). You need to start to like your students despite their annoying faults, because most teenagers are annoying sometimes (as are most people in general).

    I have had more success as a teacher once I recognized my influence energy-wise and took control of the atmosphere in the room by guarding it more fiercely. Sometimes, I'll see a student with low energy or negative energy, and it provides me an opportunity to figure out how to make the class content more accessible to him/her so they understand why I am enthusiastic about it. They will get excited if they are convinced it's important, and teenagers are not good about being objective about what's important. They need to feel it selfishly as well, it's just how they are, developmentally, and they aren't necessarily TRYING to be difficult. Some are, but I would argue most are not.

    With art, sometimes it is more difficult because it can take a little more convincing (depending on the population/student) because society has marginalized the arts and made them seem unimportant. I know that's ********, and so do you, but that isn't the student's fault. We as art teachers need to make art important to the kids--then teaching it is easy.

    That said, I will provide them with handouts and voice instruction as to what to do, and if they don't listen, it's another story. I am not going to hand hold them if they don't pay attention (I used to but I am making it a point this year not to), unless they have an IEP or 504. But listening to directions comes more quickly to kids who are actually motivated by the content. So my point is that the way you introduce and present the content DOES make a big difference. You cannot expect students to view the world the same way you do. I honestly and respectfully believe that is your major issue here and as evidenced in so many other posts.

    Why smile and create an inviting and safe atmosphere? Because art should feel like a personal experience, and you can only react in an artistically expressive way in an environment that feels mutually respectful. They won't feel safe if you are waiting on them to teach you to have a better attitude about teaching--you're placing too much on them that they can't understand at their age.

    Instead, you need to view these kids as unformed, uninformed potential artists with untapped artistic potential--all of them--because ALL HUMANS can become artistic. It's a part of what makes humankind different from all other animals--we make art!! These kids that come in to see you are apathetic because they have no REASON to care about art. YOU need to give them a reason. Please do, because your students should be able to have an authentic artistic experience, and you have the knowledge to give that to them. The only problem, in my opinion, is your difficulty with this age group and knowing how to be a respectable adult who feels confident relating to people of this age group.

    I am sorry if this is blunt, that it just how I am when I see something that I think I can help with. I am not perfect, and I would be happy to give you ideas if you need them.
     
  30. Linguist92021

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    Smiling and saying good morning is a non-option for most? I think the opposite is true.
    One normal smile and a good morning goes a looooong way. You don't have to be all happy about it, maybe you don't even smile, but at least acknowledge the kid.

    I have made it a point to say good morning to every single kid who comes in my classroom, even if they're late. Especially if they're late, I don't ask them where they've been, why they're late, I just say good morning, this is what we're doing. It has made a huge difference.

    I'm not a naturally smily person, I'm actually quite serious, in fact my face looks mean when I don't smile, so often I have to smile to soften my look. But a smile will not make me look weak or overly friendly with them. I'm just simply acknowledging them.

    Most of our students don't see smiles and don't even hear normal greetings other than from us at school. a lot of these kids don't even talk to their parents in the morning, or the parents say nothing to them, or they yell at them already first thing. They actually love our school because we create a safe and caring environment, which starts with acknowledging that these kids exist and they're welcome there.
     
  31. a teacher

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    I think I have somehow given the impression that I am a grump and have unrealistic expectations of students and I don't like them.

    What I meant about the non-option is true. I am pleasant and certainly speak with a kind and/or understanding tone. I will also joke around with students when the occasion arises. I will NOT stand in the hallway and greet kids one by one. I don't know many teachers who do. I also can't smile all day long and act super excited to see kids. Again, I have rarely seen that and I have been in many schools. Sorry, super-perky ain't happening. I actually find it annoying when teachers are that way.

    As far as why they can't follow directions, I need to streamline my methods, but I think also it's their apathy and laziness. Or perhaps they are used to being hand-fed everything or low expectations. The problems aren't that serious. My original inquiry was about how to have energy when your audience is a bore. The comment that performers don't rely on their audience is way off.
     
  32. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Sep 30, 2015

    I don't stand by the door and greet them one by one. And I would never shake their hands one by one. I know many who do and I know it's great, but for me it takes too long and who knows where these teenagers' hands been.
    However I do greet them as groups, the bell rings, 3-4 come in, I say good morning, make eye contact, I'm somewhere in the front, or even just behind my desk. 2 more come in, same thing, 4 more, same thing. After that each comes in, I greet them I don't want to make them feel like they're ignored. Obviously if I'm already teaching and talking, I don't stop and greet them, but I still try to do so at one point. If we're already reading, I nod, or smile, or at least make eye contact.

    I also don't smile all day long, I'm not the type. And I don't act superexcited to see the kids, but I do appear to be in a normal mood, a teacher who likes her job and likes the students.
     
  33. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Interesting--- it's actually required at my school to be at the door and to specifically shake every student's hand and say "good morning/afternoon" to them. Sure, there are days that something is in the middle of breaking down or the phone rings right then, but at least 80% of all teachers are on their door, each bell. It's even part of admin observations.

    I agree with the above posters- taking that 0.5 seconds to greet a student goes a long way. Seems it would be worth faking some pep for a few minutes.
     
  34. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    See replies in bold.
    Effectiveness in driving success doesn't just mean you can directly teach content and expect them to magically make their behavior better. You're teaching children who respond to those small things such as the greeting, the brief 1-on-1 conversation...and that response can often mean a big difference in their engagement, and thus, what you're driving for, increased success.
     
  35. a teacher

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    REQUIRING you to do that is unacceptable. I would talk to my union rep about that.
     
  36. a teacher

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    It can, but sometimes it makes no difference. You can be as friendly as you want. If a kid doesn't work because they are lazy or have personal problems, your efforts are useless. It's best to only concentrate on the ones who show effort.
     
  37. a teacher

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    The dynamics and context are different. If the audience doesn't laugh the comedian has to change his material. Anyway his audience constantly changes and they are not teenagers. If a class is dull and low energy, it can remain that way regardless of what the teacher does. The problem remains: how do you get energy and get motivated?
     
  38. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Standing up for a teacher here in a way, I do think it's a valid comment on a more broad level to find the general energy students bring to learning to be lacking, and to yearn for an audience that loved learning more. I do think that, as a society, we've moved further and further away from the burden of learning being on the student, to the burden of learning being on the teacher. I think this is valid. The reasons are multiple, not the least of which is that I believe our sense of entitlement grows and grows with each generation, with a sense of personal responsibility waning.

    That being said, the question of "what can we do about it" inevitably must come back to "what can I do about it," because that's within our realm of control. Sadly, being right about something does not change it necessarily.

    All of that being said, and believing that we - as educators - should take the lead with inspiring and facilitating learning, I do think it appropriate to expect students to do their part. However, I think the manner in which we set these expectations is critical - we can't simply passively expect them to be better. I do think that this was the initial point of the OP's post when it was asked:

     
  39. EdEd

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    So, are you asking how to stay energetic and motivated given that dullness and laziness persist, or how to get that dullness and laziness to go away?
     
  40. miatorres

    miatorres Comrade

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    I definitely agree. Some students will have a negative attitude with any teacher in the world. Students who blame teachers for their D's and F's are generally just trying to make excuses because to them, it's easier to point the finger at everyone else rather than to do their best to learn. Sadly, some are just bad seeds.

    There are also some students who will learn no matter who their teacher is or which K-12 school they attend. Why? The answer is obvious. Because they have the IQ, drive, and refusal to make excuses for bad grades/attitudes.
     
  41. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    We are required to be at our classroom door on duty at the start of each class. I love it! I get to say hello to my students, former students passing in the hall, and the coworkers who teach near me. I don't always shake everyone's hand, but I try to greet everyone with at least a wave.
     

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