Dealing with a student who has crossed the line

Discussion in 'General Education' started by cruiserteacher, May 16, 2010.

  1. cruiserteacher

    cruiserteacher Comrade

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    May 16, 2010

    I teach 5th grade. I have a student who has been a challenge all year I've done everything I can think of to help this child. He needs attention 100% of the time, and if he's not getting it, he's lashing out at anyone and everyone around him. He sits away from the rest of the class. He earned his way back into a table group at one time, but quickly earned his way back out. He's on a separate behavior plan, but once he knows he's screwed up for the day, he just quits trying. I've taken him to our intervention assistance team and had meetings with his family. I feel I have been MORE than patient with this child. He has been suspended for a number of things, mostly disrespect and fighting, probably more times than he should have been. His family has even told me they are surprised he hasn't been expelled yet. We have 14 days of school left and I'm just trying to get by. On Friday, he acted up in Art, along with three other students, and I had promised my class an extra recess if they had a good day. I didn't want to punish my class, so I told the four students to take a book outside and read instead of the extra recess. Everyone else took it in stride, except this particular student. He was screaming about how unfair I am, throwing things inside an open window, etc. I was doing my best to ignore him until he decided to yell "I hope you die" and "I hope (my baby's name) dies" I have a 10 month old son. To me, that has crossed the line. It took all I had to hold it together and not even talk to him until we got into the office. He was given a one-day suspension. Even still, when he was brought into my classroom at the end of the day to get his things, he was yelling about how I got him suspended! He just doesn't get it. All of my other students said, "No, you got yourself suspended!" I don't know how I can be patient with this child anymore. He can attack me all he wants (verbally, of course!), but the fact that he said that about my child, I don't know if I can forgive that. Does anyone have any advice to help me get through these last 14 days? Thanks!
     
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  3. gottagoodgig

    gottagoodgig Companion

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    May 16, 2010

    I'm not sure I have any great advice, but I just wanted to reach out and wish you the best of luck in these last few days.

    This student is hurting is so many ways. You are hurting in many ways too. In just a few days, you'll get the space you need.

    Could this student "help" in other rooms. Would other teachers at your school be willing/able to help support this child? Principal? Counselor? Others? He's "your" student, but really he is everyone's student and if you're at your end....someone else should be able to provide some relief and support.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    May 16, 2010

    With only 14 days of school left, the best solution might be to just remove this child from the classroom completely when he acts out. Find some room or space in the office and send him there to do his work. This doesn't have to be considered an ISS. It is simply providing the student a workspace away from distractions so he doesn't get himself in trouble.

    Most of the schools in my district have an area like this and I know a couple of them have used it for students with similar patterns of behavior.
     
  5. Major

    Major Connoisseur

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    May 16, 2010

    The admin in most of the schools in my district would give you 110% support. I would send the kid to the front office anytime (over the next two weeks) he crossed the line...... and the comments he made are inexcusable.
     
  6. Samothrace

    Samothrace Cohort

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    May 16, 2010

    I'm curious to know what his parents said in response to that. B/c they obviously have no control over their child. And it seems that this should be falling on the parents to figure out what is going on, why he is saying what he is/acting out/throwing tantrums.

    Does your elementary school go up to 6th grade? or is your 6th grade in a middle school? If his actions/outbursts don't change, I would imagine he will be in for a rough road in the coming years.


    I'm not sure I'd have been as calm as you. I'd have been calling the police to send that kid and his parents a message.
     
  7. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    May 16, 2010

    Maybe he should be made to fill out a journal or write an essay so that he could reflect on his choices? Maybe you could write something that expresses how he made you feel before he has to write and then he writes a response? Seems like this kid is angry and chose the most damaging thing he could think of to say to you. What if he was made to discuss this, write this to explain his actions, why they were unacceptable. The class could write their reactions also. When he returns from his suspension he can be in another class, away from his triggers and read these before he writes his paper. I don't know, it is just a thought. He seems to be very impulsive and cannot control his lashing out? Or can he...
     
  8. KLSSwimmer

    KLSSwimmer Habitué

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    May 16, 2010

    I think that the administration has to be involved in this situation. When this child has an outburst, he needs to be removed from the classroom immediately, because it is not fair that he taking away from the instruction of the other students in the classroom. Best of luck to you!
     
  9. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    May 16, 2010

    With your union rep present I would meet with your principal immediately explaining the situation and that you fear for yourself as well as the other students in your room. My school has a policy in regards to this kind of verbal outbreak. The student would immediately be suspended and would have to see a counselor. If the student allowed back in school I would ask that he be removed from your class. Your school must have a student handbook that covers this type of incident.
     
  10. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    May 16, 2010

    Is there another teacher that could give you some relief for awhile? I could ask most of my co-workers for help. But then again, I could also rely on the administration to suspend him or keep him in the office area all day.

    With something as severe as what you describe, the counselor would have contacted the school psychologist, who would have evaluated and made contact with an excellent behavioral program we have at a local hospital. They run an afterschool program for free that helps kids with problems.
     
  11. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    May 16, 2010

    I would slow down a bit and think of the student's needs. It appears to me that he needs help. While giving him help is not your job, finding him some help is.
     
  12. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    May 16, 2010

    what the....?
    There is something seriously wrong with that child! Are his parents dead or has he been abused???
    With 2 weeks left I would either set him up a desk in front of the office, and just give him packets and bookwork to do (if you are allowed to) and call a social worker.
    You don't have to go to work and get verbally abused.
     

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