Deaf students in college English/writing skills

Discussion in 'College' started by CathyRose01, Nov 18, 2014.

  1. CathyRose01

    CathyRose01 New Member

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    Nov 18, 2014

    Hello!
    I tutor deaf students in English writing skills. I really need some ideas to use to teach correct sentence structure. It is difficult to find activities that are not too juvenile.

    Deaf students function as ESL learners, and their sentence structure is a major concern.

    Thank you for any suggestions!
    Cathy
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Nov 18, 2014

    Without compromising anyone's privacy, can you give me an example of what you're seeing?
     
  4. memoryengravers

    memoryengravers New Member

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    Nov 26, 2014

    I make a laser engraved ASL Scrabble set, maybe you could incorporate that into your tutoring ? I was thinking of something like.. when a word is put down, the person has to use it in a grammatically correct sentence ?

    Just a thought.
     
  5. Fred Cameron

    Fred Cameron New Member

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    Nov 27, 2014

    Use more than one way to demonstrate or explain information.People who are deaf or hard of hearing often use vision as a primary means of receiving information. Captioned videos, overheads, diagrams, and other visual aids are useful instructional tools for students with hearing impairments.
    Circular seating arrangements offer students who are deaf or hard of hearing the best advantage for seeing all class participants.I hope this idea can help you
     
  6. ThomasR

    ThomasR New Member

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    Jul 19, 2020

    Editor at 12hoursessay
    Visual Phonics is the tool that is helpful for supporting the development of reading and writing skills in students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. This one would probably be most effective in supporting spelling, vs. grammar, word order, etc.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Jul 19, 2020

    My suggestion for teaching sentence structure to deaf students would be teaching diagramming sentences from the ground up and making sure as the sentences become more complex you make sure to use additional, high-quality, examples.

    Many people don't like diagramming and claim it was no help. Diagramming is hard because proper sentence structure is hard.

    Then once they have a firm grasp on diagramming, start teaching when parts of a complex sentence can be moved to different locations and how the words may or may not be interpreted by the reader as more or less important.

    Also, work on verb tenses within a sentence, paragraph, and beyond.
    Move on to first person, second person, third person, active voice, passive voice.

    You must directly teach structure and grammar. There is no "catching" grammar like in hearing students which is relied on by many teachers of hearing students.
     
  8. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    It's in storage right now, but we all trained on a system where different parts of speech and parts of a sentence have different shapes and colors associated with them. It makes it really visual for the learner, and fun because they get to highlight everything! I know our high school teachers use it with good results.

    I always used Grammar Punk, and students loved it!
     
    a2z likes this.
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Members of A to Z, kindly pay attention to the time elapsed between the last previous post on a thread and the one to which you're considering a response, especially when a brand name is involved.
     

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