Data Wall

Discussion in 'General Education' started by cutelilram, Aug 1, 2014.

  1. cutelilram

    cutelilram Rookie

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    Aug 1, 2014

    I am really wanting to create a data wall and a SMART Goals board this year. I teach third grade. Does anyone have one? If so,...

    Do you link the students names to the data? or Do you just do class averages?

    What information do you post on the data wall?

    How do you teach the students to use the data to improve?


    Thanks.
     
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  3. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    We don't have data walls in our classroom because test information is considered sensitive and highly private. However, we do have it in the conference room since only faculty and staff go in there. They post scores by grade level, then the teacher's name, and individual student scores, but never with the student's names.

    If I were using it, I would probably have the students keep an individual data sheet with their own scores in a folder or binder of some sort. Then I'd have them review which questions they got wrong so they could identify the areas they're weak in and feel they need to improve.

    I have a computer program that tallies up our standardized math tests in that manner and it shows me patterns so I'm able to identify that Johnny mostly got word problems and subtraction facts wrong or Sally mostly got two-digit addition with regrouping wrong.

    I'd try to do something like that, except having the kids analyze their own data for weak areas.
     
  4. cutelilram

    cutelilram Rookie

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    My students already keep a personal portfolio/data folder. I am leaning more towards displaying whole class averages for reading, math, and spelling without student names. I am just curious about how others who do it set up theirs and the types of data that is tracked.
     
  5. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I would never keep a public data wall. I can't think of a better way to boost the egos of kids who don't need their ego boosted, and to lower the egos of kids who don't need their ego lowered, then a public data wall.
     
  6. cutelilram

    cutelilram Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2014

    In the past I displayed each student's reading level that had the quarterly goals on them. Each time the student met their goal, they colored in a star. None of my students ever had an issue with it and were excited when they got to color in a star.

    When I said that I was going to post a whole class data wall, I mean class average. So the class average of the weekly spelling tests or math tests. This way the students can privately compare where they are to the class as a whole. In my experience, students in my previous classes want to get better and always share their grades with their classmates anyway, regardless if they are high or low.
     
  7. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 2, 2014

    :thumb::thumb::agreed:

    When I was in 1st grade, I was confident and believed in myself. We had a type of data wall where we had stars depending on how we did in reading. It wasn't hard for me to see that I had far less stars than most students. I remember for the first time feeling really dumb. Worse is I did try and I still seemed to have less stars than most of the other students. I never cried or complained. I did just what most 1st graders do, they keep it inside and just think they are not as smart as the others. I did try less in reading in the next 4 years, and avoided most reading. It wasn't until middle school where through some positive experiences did I get my confidence back in reading. This is from someone who never had a reading problem, but took a data wall way too seriously because I was a 6 year old.

    The worst thing a data wall does isn't about self-esteem, it often leads lower students to try less. This is because at age 6, children think they do well because they are smart or dumb. This is different than a 16 year old who believes they do well, or don't do well, because of their effort.

    Data is a great thing...making it public in the primary grades goes against what it is trying to achieve--more effort from students.
     
  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Yes, 3rd graders are awesome as they want to do better. I think it is good that you have it done privately in their folders so they can see personal growth. That is sensitive so they are not embarrassed.

    I would not put up class averages. At this age, showing a student
    they are lower than the other students, only makes many of them feel dumb and leads to less effort. The change often is not displayed publicly and teachers often can't see it. Research and personal experience shows it is there. Please read above my personal experience to see why.
     
  9. raynepoe

    raynepoe Companion

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    Aug 2, 2014

    Hmmm I was thinking of linking my 5th grade data (all subjects) to a math standard (just showing mean, median, mode) of pretest vs. posttest. Do you think that would be embarrassing for students or show growth?
     
  10. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Personal goals are awesome. That is definitely something to do. The problem with what you're saying in the second paragraph is that I can not every kid shares their grades. I'd be flat-out shocked if in a class of 25 third graders, you ever had fewer than five of them get a paper back, look at the grade, and silently cover it up until everybody around them had lost interest in talking about grades. If you put down class averages, you're still making it obvious to the kids below the cut line, and additionally, you run the risk of turning a middle kid into a low kid... the kid who gets a 81% when the class average is an 83% probably won't really "get" the fact that he is still right at the class average.

    Whatever you decide to do can be successful if you build the classroom environment up, and I'm sure you'll do whatever is necessary to try and minimize kids from giving up... I'm just explaining why I personally wouldn't do this. You need to do what will work in your classroom and your situation though.
     
  11. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I'd be more inclined to use just pre-tests, or to "fudge the data" a bit, and add in a few extra low scores. There are so many things that you can use for mean, median and mode though other than test scores.
     
  12. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Having that data for you is great. Privately showing students where they are at as which standards they master and which they haven't should be helpful. As far as how they compare to the whole class, this isn't helpful. Yes, it could me embarrassing, but even if it isn't, it is at least distracting them from what will really motivate them. What will motivate them is what they have control over. They can see that they don't know _____ standard, and later you can show them that they now know _____standard, but still need to learn ______ standard.

    The research shows that the largest driving force in student motivation are those who believe that effort makes a difference. Data can be a strong motivator when students see that their own effort increases their performance, and they are not distracted by other data.

    Therefore, if it is data on pretest vs. posttest on each individual student, and you only share that info with them privately, then yes I think that is good. If it is public or compares it to the class data, then I think it has the danger to do more harm than good for many students.
     
  13. Organic Poppy

    Organic Poppy Rookie

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    I know everyone here is against Data Walls and would never have one. However, my state mandates every classroom has a data wall. :whistle: Sometimes you just have to do it.
     
  14. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Your state MANDATES it? Ugh...
     
  15. Organic Poppy

    Organic Poppy Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2014

    Sure does. It started 3yrs ago. I don't use student names and I try to make it fun. Things like stickers and cute little critters are used to track. Some teacher's boards are very "data wall" looking. They say they don't want the kids to think it is a game. I, on the other hand, don't mind the kids thinking it is fun. I want them to look forward to changing their critter instead of dreading plotting another data point.
     

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