Daily reports

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by sewsouth, Aug 29, 2008.

  1. sewsouth

    sewsouth Companion

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    Aug 29, 2008

    Does anyone give out written daily reports to parents.
    Like ?????? had a great day. He is having some trouble
    holding his pencil, or ??????? would not listen even though
    I corrected him several times.

    If you do what format do you use and did you make your own?

    I have a parent that works and her parents will be
    dropping off and picking up her child. She wants to know
    how he is doing each day.

    I have never done this before or even been asked to so I am a little unsure of how to go about this.

    Any suggestions will be appreciated.
     
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  3. TeachingBee

    TeachingBee New Member

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    Aug 29, 2008

    Where I did my student teaching the center used composition books. A book was assigned for each child and once a week (mostly Friday) the books would be left in the cubby for the parents to read and either talk to the teacher if needed or make written comments. If a parent wanted a daily report, s/he would need to speak to the teacher personally at the end of each day. We had a policy of trying to phrase everything very positively and not mentioning the small stuff at all unless it became a problem where it interfered with the classroom.

    Hope this helps!
     
  4. Taliesin

    Taliesin Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2008

    I did a daily report last year but just found it to be too time consuming. I formatted it like a newsletter- it had upcoming events, reminders, our current theme, what we did for the day and a small place for me to write a personalized comment. The parents absolutely loved it but I just can't do it this year. I am switching to a weekly format. I will still have a small section to personalize it for each family.
     
  5. vbubbles1874

    vbubbles1874 Companion

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    Aug 29, 2008

    I have to do one everyday for every child...they're 4/5 they can talk. Anyway, mine is a word document. I can't post links yet so if you would like to see it, pm me and I will be happy to share.
     
  6. amethysst

    amethysst Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2008

    We do a daily note -- I will do a rough draft of what it looks like

    Blank Line for child's name _______________

    Date ______________________

    Today we

    a few blank lines where you can put in a summary of activities, for example today we worked in our Weekly Reader, talked about being a good friend and practiced our counting and cutting skills.

    I had an

    Excellent Good Fair Day
    Then a few lines so you can elaborate if you feel you need to.
    If we have major incidents we write a separate report for that and clip it on to the sign in/sign out sheet.
    Comments _______________________________________


    I participated in

    all some few activities.

    I ate

    all most some none of my lunch.

    During naptime I

    slept rested quietly was disruptive

    You circle which applies to each child in each area. It is a quick way to give the parents some infor about the child's day. We usually decorate top with some clipart. We have a master copy, each day I fill in the top part with the date and what we are doing and then at lunch time we sort of survey who ate what and during naptime fill in the rest....put it in their folders outside and we're done with notes and parent communication unless we see them at pickup.
    We have a crate with individual file folders and folders for each child...these notes along with and papers or crafts are put in the folder daily. It gives the parents insight into their child's day -- especially if we don't get to see them. Our center is open from 6:3in the am until 6 p.m. so it is good communication between teacher and home. It doesn't take much time and it keeps parents informed.

    We can also write reminders if we need to.
     
  7. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Aug 29, 2008

    We have the "circle what applies" sheet for individuals-However, I find that they don't really read them. I encourage the parents to feel free to attend field trips and what ever they can around their schedual. If the child isn't going to "change their behavior" I even let parents come in for radomized lunch periods just to be with us.

    We do have a parent journal binder that incoming parents can view to see what we have been doing and how that meets our learning objectives. I have seen other programs do this in a blog set up.

    For the most part I make sure to speak w/ the grandparents (I think that is who you said is at pickup) and then I remind grandparent to tell mom. When the child goes to the parent from the grandparent they will also have a discussion about how the day went-I just try to sink my info into the talk they will already have.

    I also send newsletters home constantly and have family nights once a month for them to see us in action and gel with each other.
     
  8. wann2119

    wann2119 Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2008

    I do daily reports for my 3 yr olds. It has the following:

    Name
    Date
    Today I learned (I list everything we do for the day, including what centers I set up)
    I ate (all my food, most of my food, some of my food)
    I fill in what we had for lunch
    At nap I (slept, laid quietly, distrurbed my friends)
    Additional Notes (Usually says '______ had a great day!'. If something happened to the child that day, I always put it here. I also use this space to ask for supplies like empty soda bottles, toilet paper rolls, etc.

    To make this whole thing easier, I only fill out one form with the date and 'I learned today' sections. Then I make a copy for everyone in my class and fill out the rest. If everyone has already fallen asleep for nap and ate about the same, I circle those as well.

    I only have 8 kids so it doesn't take long. Still, the copying thing really cuts down time for me.
     
  9. Prekfreak

    Prekfreak Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2008

    I do daily notes and I keep mine as simple as possible, I don't have time to fill out 20 long notes everyday. A sample of mine is
    Name:
    ____ Great! (smiley face)
    ____ Pretty Good.
    ____ Needs to work on listening and following directions (I sometimes write why)
    ____ We need to have a conference (sad face)

    Parents love them and look for them. I teach the kids which ones they want checked and which ones they don't want checked. I even will write there names on them and then copy 20 or so sets which cuts my time even more.
     
  10. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Aug 30, 2008

    Only our infant and toddler rooms are required to do daily sheets, besides having a line to write or circle information about mood, eating, etc that was mentioned above, there is a space that lists supplies that need to be replenished so the teacher can just check them off as needed . things like diapers, formula, bibs, baby wipes, changes of clothes, etc. I\Our preschool and Kindergarten teachers are not required to do daily sheets but are required to do "happy grams" at least once per month for every child n our class. These can be little notes home or reward certificate type things --I sometimes just use a cute note pad ( in my case it happens to be a large bee note pad becasue my class is the busy bees) and I use a permanent marker to write domething llike WELL DONE! and then what it was -- sometimes it's being extra nice to a freind that was sad, or helping to pick up amess he/she didin't make, or improvement in writing or doing better remembering to flush, anything that is encouraging to the child and the parents.
     
  11. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Aug 30, 2008

    Our program has a behavior policy based on daily reports. I too think it's way too time consuming. So, I will tweak it to make it work for me. IMO, if a particular child had a bad day, that child needs a note and phone call. No sense in sending home tons of smiley faces, which will still be in that folder come February. The parents know they have good kids, but if that kid messes up, they want to know right away. That note should be signed. If you can't reach them by phone, you have the note (copied in your files), and that is your documentation.

    At the end of the week, I will send home a good report, okay report, or what is going on report! :D That way, there is no surprises. Why didn't you call me and tell me such and such, because... as I say... I don't tell you every single day what is going on...unless it is a bad day. You probably ignored the bad notes, thinking they were all good...because that's what you wanted to see.

    I am not for the 'calling just to tell you what a good day we had'. I think that is only necessary for kids who are struggling and improving. Our time and parents time is too valuable. Call me when it is important. Send a happy note if you wish, but don't call me at work to say how much you enjoy having my child in your class. I am pleased, but my gut reaction is...what's wrong. I need to leave early? Is she sick? That's how us working parents operate. So, I respect that. And if I am a SAH parent, I may have a baby or sick/elderly parent to watch, and can't stay on the phone to chat with a teacher for long.

    JMO...
     
  12. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Aug 30, 2008

    I agree about sending notes versus calling parents. They seem to be taken aback when I call just to let them know things are going well. Writing notes takes more time, but the parents appreciate it more too.

    And, keeping things positive is a MUST, IMO. Trifle little things that are there one day and gone the next are worrisome to parents I think. They need to hear the good stuff first so they know that you know and understand their child. Then, when there's a pattern that's emerged of some behavior that needs to change, they're more likely to listen to you as their child's teacher.
     
  13. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Aug 30, 2008

    With as much going on as we have in my room, I tell my parents ahead of time... "no news is good news". I tried little short quick smiley face notes, etc, and they wouldn't take them out of their notebooks, backpacks, etc. So, I stopped wasting my time. Now, if a parent did want to know how things were going, I would jot a note. I have parents that keep in touch with me through email and that is better. If I don't get it checked during naptime, then I can check it after the kids go home and let mom know what's been happening... good or bad.
     
  14. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Aug 30, 2008

    also, some programs discouraged bad notes..because 'certain' parents were known to go off on you. they didn't want to lose any kids (that is $$$) due to complaints from the teacher. they said, just, talk to them. :( Parents swear up and down their kids are angels, and never act up at home. :rolleyes: They start to get angry when they come in every night, and the first thing you say is, "I want you to know that he/she... again" they come in making faces, as soon as you say you want to see them a second. Many times, they are rushing...and say they don't have time, talk to wife/husband in the morning. You know the morning is the same way...or they play off each other. "Talk to her dad, talk to his mom...she handles that stuff." :unsure:

    btw...every program I have worked in had accident reports. that was a must. filled out in triplicate, signed by teacher and parent. I don't like them because it is a red flag that always seems like a sign I wasn't doing something right. They usually just sign, but they have to read, 'while at play, your child slipped and fell" (and I know they are thinking...where were you?) It is our job to care and supervise, but practically impossible to stand over 21 kids all during play. and they will run, and stumble and slip. And when it happens between 2 kids, you can't mention the other kids' name or some parents will come in the room looking around for that kid, and/or his parent!
     
  15. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Aug 30, 2008

    :cool:I pretty much agree with the smiley notes and happy phone call ideas here. I think the mom just wants to make sure she isn't "out of the loop" family projects, field trips, the gifts w/ the poems or captions on work-all that helps her to feel involved much more than smiley papers that won't get looked at. Here, the family binder does help (and since we are emergent it helps w/ documentation of what we are learning) but all of the children are in the binder it isn't just one.

    :whistle:180+ sheets of paper buries the parents in my opinion. It is a start, but there are other ways that work better. And talking to the drop off person will work well as well, just as if that person were the family member in charge. Just be careful not to forget to call the parent when/if trouble starts.
     

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