Daily Behavior Charts

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by skelley, Jun 22, 2005.

  1. skelley

    skelley Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2005

    I have been teaching for 5 years. (I teach 1st grade by the way) Every year I have always used some type of daily behavior chart. I glue a list of classroom rules into one side of a manila folder and laminate it. Then each week I tape in a behavior chart. Each day the kids put all of their daily work into their folder and then turn in to me toward the end of the day. I then look over their work, fill out their behavior chart accordingly and then send home. The parents then have to initial and return the next day. I have always been a big believer in letting parents know about their child's behavior. The problem that I have run into is that often I have a parent that just can't let things go when they see that their child has a comment frequently in their folder. I think a lot of them start thinking that there is a serious problem when really, it's just petty stuff going on. Also, it's not always easy to get these ready everyday by the end of the day. I just wonder if I am creating too much work for myself. Only one other teacher and myself do daily behavior folders, everyone else in my school does weekly. The thing is I also send home a weekly progress report. My question to you all is - what do you send home and does it work? Does anyone else think that I am giving myself too much work? :eek: Thanks for the advice!
     
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  3. MelissainGA

    MelissainGA Groupie

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    Jun 22, 2005

    We have an Agenda (the county buys them). This is used to communicate with the parents and it has a place for their behavior (smiley, straight, frown). It's a very easy (and quick) communication method and parents seem to respond well. I only write a comment if there is a frowny face.
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jun 22, 2005

    I think you are creating more work than is necessary. We only use daily behavior charts for children who are having serious behavior problems. I only had one for one semester this year. I don't even send home weekly behavior reviews. IF there is a problem I discuss it with the individual parents. Otherwise, I expect great behavior and usually get it. We do use a daily assignment book and parent send notes in and I send notes home in it. We also have 4 parent conferences per school year, one with each progress report, and most parents attend.
     
  5. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    Jun 22, 2005

    One of the 1st grade teachers where I work tapes a behavior chart to each of the children's desk. At the end of the day she will put a picture or leave it blank.
    When a child has had warnings and did something I found unacceptable I would send home an Oops note which says your child had trouble remembering the following rule. He/she recieved so many warnings. Please review the rules tonight with your child. In Sept I send home a copy of the rules that we write together as a class.
     
  6. dee

    dee Companion

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    Jun 22, 2005

    Skelley,

    I also teach first grade and use daily behavior charts. I like to use daily behavior charts because as a parent, I prefer daily charts over weekly charts. I know this means more work, but I will continue to use them.
     
  7. Amanda

    Amanda Administrator Staff Member

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    Jun 23, 2005

    I would never be able to keep up with daily charts! I kept track of behavior daily, however... I did this with both K and 1st. I had a system with cups, where everyone would start in the 0 cup at the beginning of the day... They would move to the 1, 2, or 3 cup if they caused a problem. Students that were still in the 0 cup at the end of the day got a stamp on their hand. Parents knew to look for the stamp. If a student got to the 3 cup, they would get a note that had to be signed and returned the next day, or I would phone the parents if it was a serious problem. Parents liked to be informed daily, and it only took a minute at the end of the day. I just grabbed the 0 cup and called out names, or we did it quickly when we were lined up to leave. For those kids that were in the 3 cup, I had to write a note or if I ran out of time, I'd have to call home. Sometimes I could write the note with the child during recess when we were discussing the problems and what they will do differently.
     
  8. camcdade

    camcdade Comrade

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    Jun 23, 2005

    It sounds like you could "kill two birds with one stone" and just create a combined progress report and behavior report. Our school does these every three weeks. We laminate manilla folders and have a progress report about academics on the left and a report about behavior on the right. You could do this weekly if you wanted to. Sending home behavior reports daily invites more parent responses. I would think that weekly is quite enough. That way, you can still communicate issues before they become big problems.
     
  9. sciencet

    sciencet Rookie

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    Jun 23, 2005

    Like MelissainGA, we use a daily agenda. Notes to parents are written in these, but we also have "D" notes that we use since our students rotate teachers. "D" notes are simply a 1/4 sheet of paper that has the student's name and date at the top. Below that are lines for Verbal Warning, 1st time out (usually 5 minutes), 2nd time out (10 minutes), office with space to write what was done that warranted the "D" note. These are sent to each teacher throughout the day and stapled in the agenda at the end of the day -- for some we have to write that a "D" note has been attached or they disappear.

    For students that exihibit the same behavior day after day after day, we call in the parents and set up some sort of contract.
     
  10. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Jun 23, 2005

    We also use agendas and I put their behavior color in at the end of the day. I only write notes if they are on a color other than green and it is usually a very quick "talking during work time", "not listening", "not following hallway rules", etc kind of note. Doesn't take more than about 10 minutes at the end of the day to do. I think parents like to see a daily report on their child's behavior.
     
  11. MelissainGA

    MelissainGA Groupie

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    Jun 23, 2005

    TxSandMom,

    I wouldn't have chosen the "frowny face" idea either but the county office purchased the same type of agenda to be used with all 15 schools in the county. They wanted something that was standard for everyone. Therefore, I use the smiley, straight face, frowny method. I was very lucky though with my class last year I didn't have to circle "frowny" very often because I made my expectations clear as well as my consequences. They were smart enough (2nd graders) to decide the rewards were better than the consequences. Also, on the rare occurance that someone did act up I would just e-mail their parent. It wasn't a recurring issue.
     
  12. teach2004

    teach2004 Companion

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    Jun 23, 2005

    The class that I did my student teaching in had a wonderful behavior system that worked. I plan to use it this coming year in my 1st grade classroom. We used a color system. Everyone started out on green (Good Job!). If they misbehaved, they had to move their clothespin down to the next color. They were: Blue (Warning), Yellow (Miss 10 min. of Recess), Orange (Miss Entire Recess), and Red (Note Home/Call Parents). We could glance at it and see where each child was. Each child had a behavior sheet with a box for each day. They would place their own check mark on there using three different colors: green, yellow, or red. If they were on green or blue, they got a green check mark. If they were on yellow or orange, they got a yellow check mark. If they were on red, they got a red check mark. They would do this themselves at the end of each day. We might make a note at the bottom of one of the days telling why they were on red, or praising them for doing a good job. If we ran out of time and the students couldn't put their marks down, we could easily see who we needed to make a check mark for. Most of the time all but a few of the students were on blue or green, so we didn't bother with theirs. We just made sure that we did the yellow and red check marks. The students will quickly fill in the blanks that need to be green. They LOVE to see green marks. They were sent home on Fridays, and the students had to bring them back signed on Monday. It was a great system. Besides little notes or comments on some papers, there is basically no work for you. The kids are responsible for themselves.
     
  13. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Jun 23, 2005

    We do the smiley, straight, or frowning faces. It's quick and easy, and the parents like daily reports. I wish my brother's teacher had given us behavior (or even grade!) reports, we would ask her repeatedly, but we never heard anything from her until report card and conference time (Well, he's been gettingin fights and is failing 2 subjects that he used to be doing fine in...) ARRGG! Weekly or monthly reports might be ok for the older kids, but I like daily reports for the young kids
     
  14. wdwteach

    wdwteach Cohort

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    Jun 24, 2005

    I teach 1st grade and my daily communication is a small paper bear. Each afternoon, the students color their bear the color of their card on the behavior chart that day. The parents know to look for the bear each day and what each color means. I add comments to the bears as needed and if I have time. I do send home a weekly communication folder. It is easy and does not take much time.
     
  15. iteachk-1

    iteachk-1 Rookie

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    Jun 26, 2005

    I use a stoplight graphic to match the stoplight in the room. Each child is responsible for coloring his/her own light according to where the clothes pin is on the chart in the room. I have a copy of the numbered rules on the bottom of each chart. I simply write the number of the broken rule on the stoplight. Parents sign each day. This only takes about 2-3 minutes each afternoon. In a survey given to parents last year, they really liked the daily communication.
     
  16. countrygal

    countrygal Rookie

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    Jun 26, 2005

    When I did my student teaching, each child had a folder. On one side was return to school, on the other was keep at home. We had a ziplock bag stuck to the return to school side for any money or notes sent from home. Each day we sent home a behavior sheet. It was just a sheet of paper that had been cut in half lengthwise. It had each day listed on it. We were on the green, yellow, red sticks. If you were on green you had smiley face, yellow-straight, red-sad. Next to each day, was typed: following directions, talking, listening, etc. All we had to do each day, was circle the behavior next to why the child was on yellow or red. The parent signed in the space provided and returned it. The child usually brought the paper back everyday. When the week was over, it was place in a file for the child. A new paper was given on Monday. This way we only had to use one paper for the parents to write notes to us, or us to parents. For the children that would lose it, I simply stapled the paper to the inside or front. It works! It was very easy for the parents and the students, and us!!!
     
  17. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    1teachK I like the bear idea. Next year my kids will have an afternoon so I am thinking maybe when they are finished with their snack they will color in their bear!
     
  18. MrsT's Garden

    MrsT's Garden Rookie

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    Jun 27, 2005

    wonderful!

    I really like the idea of have a rubric along with the colors, seems as though that might be very effective and efficient.

    Might I borrow it?
    Thanks,
    Debi
     
  19. cwest

    cwest New Member

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    Oct 21, 2005

    I think a daily behavior chart is only necessary for those students on a behavior plan. This keeps the parents aware of the daily progress. A weekly chart for all other students gives the parents a chance to discuss behavior issues or give kudos to behavior champions. A daily chart takes away from the importance of that special note. It also takes away from a student getting a chance to take the initiative to improve the behavior on their own terms-if you tell their parents you have already punished them.
     
  20. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Oct 21, 2005

    I use the color system like many others have mentioned. I mark the kids planners each day with a bingo dabber. I recently bought some new dabbers that are metallic paint. It only takes a few seconds to dry and everyone has a record of their daily behavior. If a child gets on a color below green, I write in their planner at the time of the problem so I'm not rushing at the end of the day.
     
  21. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Oct 21, 2005

    I forgot to mention I have a planner code so all I have to do is write the number. The code is glued into the front of the planner, and is on our six weeks newsletter. Example- 1) homework not complete or not turned in 2) not following directions, etc. That saves time as well. I have the kids sign a log in the classroom and they have to write the number of the rule they broke beside their name in the color column they are on.
     

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