Current Events

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by AshleyNE, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. AshleyNE

    AshleyNE New Member

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    Jun 19, 2019

    I work in an alternative high school and have been trying to incorporate current events into the curriculum. My students love the discussion portion, but not the writing. Anyone used current events differently with success?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Jun 20, 2019

  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jun 20, 2019

    I've had the students
    Must you include a written component?
     
  5. AshleyNE

    AshleyNE New Member

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    Jun 20, 2019

    Thank you for the link, I am not familiar with Article of the Week, I will take a look!
     
  6. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

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    Jun 23, 2019

    Why don't they like to write it? Maybe keep written part brief. I have had students read current events articles and then,after discussion, they write two paragraphs: #1) Summary of article (including title, author, and name of newspaper) 2) Their response, what they feel should happen and why. At times I have them squish all of this info into one paragraph.

    When my community has issues being voted on I have them present the issue and then share with the class their view and why. I have had them create psa type videos as well. (They have used google slides, but some have also done fancy shmancy videos on their phones.)

    It sounds hokey, but my HS seniors have gotten really into it.
     
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  7. Michelle

    Michelle Rookie

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    Jun 23, 2019

    Have you used Socratic seminars? It’s all discussion AND student led.
    Only writing would be possible pre-seminar questions and any annotated notes to help them during the seminar.
    ( if seminar is based off an article )
     
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  8. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Jun 25, 2019

    You could try a silent discussion or silent debate in order to engage the students in writing.

    Silent Discussion: Have different prompts on chart paper around the room, and teams circulate. Each student or team must contribute a written comment on each chart. Alternatively, you could keep the students stationary and circulate the prompts to each team on different, regular sized paper.

    Silent Debate: Students pair off, and each partner is assigned one of two different stances on the issue. On a two column paper, the partners trade comments back and forth.
     
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  9. fallenshadow

    fallenshadow Rookie

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    Jun 26, 2019

    Mind mapping
     
  10. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jul 15, 2019

    I was teaching English, but as weknow a lot can fall under that so I developed a pretty good curriculum (in my opinion anyways lol), to ix things up and because our kids nowadays have no clue what's going on in the real world.

    Pros:
    - student engagement was very high, I would say close to 100 % which often doesn't happen in alternative ed.
    - most of the kids really liked these classes
    - I know they were exposed to information they would have otherwise not
    - the plan includes listening, speaking and writing: taking notes and small paragraphs, so it wasn't too much
    - it was very fast paced, kids had no time to get bored or misbehave so these days were wonderful

    Cons:
    - I would not do this every day, it would be too repetitive and redundant. I did these lessons every couple f weeks on average
    - you can't preplan your lessons way ahead of time, it has to be a few days ahead at the most

    Lesson:
    - go over expectations of student work
    - students copy down vocabulary words and terms that will be in the news (you have to look these up and you need to know what your students are likely not know)
    - students watch a 20 minute CBS news segment (national news nothing local)
    - they take notes on facts, which they will later use for fact check, paragraph writing, and they get credit for the notes
    - stop the news here and there to clarify things or explain
    - after the news, students write a persuasive paragraph about something that was discussed in the news. For example we had topics such as gun control, privacy issues, etc. You can have a brief discussion to make sure they understood what was going on, they are to refer to their notes, etc.
    Emphasize that the side they choose doesn't matter, expressing their views and persuading matters
    - write another paragraph, this can be a summary of a specific news segment or they can choose
    I usually stick to paragraphs, my classes were an hour long.
    - 5-7 quick questions about random facts, fr example: "which country was NOT discussed in today's news/", multiple choice, etc.

    Every student participated and no one had the chance to say they didn't know what to do or didn't understand because everything was frontloaded, explained and discussed.
    I really like this lesson, kids were behaving, engaged, got a feeling of success, even those who never do their work.
    I usually tried to show the previous night's news but sometimes it was too heavy on politics or extremely boring, in that case I would chose up to 2-3 nights before. My kids wouldn't watch the news anyways, so anything was really new to them.
    I always downloaded the news as a file, this way I had no mishaps with the internet and the commercials were cut.

    I do independent study now but we can still teach classes, and signed up to teach current events as elective. IT will be a weekly class, so I will continue to do this.
     
  11. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Jul 17, 2019

    Perhaps The Music Man could spark some enthusiasm for writing, especially the song, Trouble in River City. Harold Hill's persuasive speech on pool is similar to the persuasive techniques used in opinionated news articles and broadcasts, and in political and other speeches. A cooperative writing project could create a persuasive poem concerning a current event, with appropriate caution to not to be offensive--today's events are often highly contested. The rhythmic poetry in The Music Man is very similar to rap; students might especially enjoy exploring and employing similar jazz rhythms to a created rap, rather than the standard rap rhythm. Another idea I had would be to rewrite an editorial so that all persuasive techniques are eliminated--just the facts.

    Back to The Music Man, the entire musical centers around Harold Hill's persuasion to sell band instruments and another salesman's attempts to persuade the town against Harold. The manner in which people's opinions are stirred up and shifted, and the manner in which everyone follows the crowd rather than deciding for oneself, although exaggerated in order to fit the time frame of the musical, it is realistic to how media, the Internet, peer pressure, and other sources persuade people. Case in point--the current Facebook craze to "storm" Area 51. Or even last year's dangerous laundry soap eating challenge.
     

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