CSET - Science

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by em7551, Aug 20, 2007.

  1. em7551

    em7551 Rookie

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    What score is needed to pass the CSET. My understanding is 220/300. Also, do you need to pass the multiple choice and constructed response sections separately?
     
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  3. aciervo

    aciervo Rookie

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    There are different requirements for each of the subtests. For some you need a higher overall percentage of raw points than others. Usually, it's somewhere between 60% at the low end and 72% at the other end. I'm not sure how the 220 scaled score is calculated, but it does not mean you need at least 220/300, for that would be 73% and that score is higher than the minimum for most CSET subtests. Maybe some questions are worth more than others? Perhaps some of the MC questions are thrown in to test them out and see if they are fair? I'm really not too sure.

    I know that subtest I and II for Gen. Science are weighted 80%MC/20%CR, and all other Science subtests are 70%MC/30%CR. You can find out how the scores were set here http://www.ctc.ca.gov/commission/agendas/2003-04/april_2003_PERF-1.pdf

    Hopefully that helps. I know Malcolm and TeacherGroupie may be more helpful. Hopefully, they can fill in what I missed and correct any mistakes I may have posted.
     
  4. em7551

    em7551 Rookie

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    Aug 20, 2007

    Found a link

    I searched the web and found this link. It appears that the tests are scored 80%MC/20%CR even for the specialty science tests. The document you referred me to is actually from 2003.http://www.cset.nesinc.com/pdfs/CS_ScoreReport_Insert.pdf

    I wonder what the purpose of the 100-300 range is? If you turned in a blank page, would you get 100? Then, 220/300 is only 60%.
    Anyone's guess, I suppose. Thanks for your response.
     
  5. em7551

    em7551 Rookie

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    I stand corrected. The above applies, for instance, to Physics 124, not 123, which must be 70/30. You were correct.
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    It seems to be typical of teacher tests that zero raw points correct translates into something more than zero in a scaled score; that's presumably a fact about packaging.

    The algorithm that converts raw scores to scaled scores includes fudge factors to allow for the fact that it's extremely hard to write test questions of absolutely equal difficulty. And the raw score that a person should achieve in order to be considered acceptably competent on each subtest is set by a committee that follows a relatively arcane process (see http://www.ctc.ca.gov/commission/agendas/2003-04/april_2003_PERF-1.pdf).

    Bottom line for science is that 2/3 correct should be plenty.
     
  7. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    IMHO the whole scaled scoring structure of CSET is designed to make the score worthless for anything other than determining whether you have the minimum qualifications to teach the subject as a first year teacher. The only sure thing is that 220 means you got at least the percentage of points that a panel of experts decided meant you were at least minimally qualified. Exactly how NES maps raw scores to scaled scores is a trade secret. It seems that many different raw scores map to the same scaled score. I have seen people get 219 two or more times in a row and I am willing to bet they had very different raw scores each time. And I don't see know CSET has enough granularity to distinguish accurately between 219 and 220. Also, I have never seen anyone with a score close to 100. The lowest score I can remember was around 200, may a few points less. It appears that the mapping function is not linear, and almost certainly not one to one, at least for failing grades. And I suspect it is equally so for passing grades. All a passing score means is that you have shown you have the minimum qualifications, not that you know a whole lot more than the minimum. You can gain a little more from a failing score, but not much. The only useful information on the score report IMHO and the number of +'s and check marks on the back.
     
  8. em7551

    em7551 Rookie

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    I agree. Plus, the whole format of 1,2 or 3 tests in one session mucks up the results. For instance, though I passed the physics test, I certainly would have scored better if it was the only test I was taking. As it was, I was racing through it at an insane pace. Will there be an asterisk next to my score saying..."took 3 in one day." Of course not. So, in the end, all that matters is Pass or Fail.
    Very 'bottom line.'
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I've seen scores rather lower than 200, though I don't recall any lower than about 160.
     
  10. em7551

    em7551 Rookie

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    Aug 21, 2007

    Thanks. I passed!!
     
  11. em7551

    em7551 Rookie

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    Thanks. I passed!!!
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Bravissima, or bravissimo, as the case may be, em7551.
     

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