CSET Multiple Subject Subtest 2 Question

Discussion in 'Multiple Subject Tests' started by PurpleCat, Dec 14, 2019.

  1. PurpleCat

    PurpleCat Rookie

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    Dec 14, 2019

    Hello TeacherGroupie,

    Would you please help me with the interpretation of my scoring for Subtest 2? I received +++ in Multiple Choice, I received "k" in Science in domains 1&2, and in Math I received "k" in domains 3&4. Overall constructed response section was a measly "+". My grand score was 202.
    Please advise me! Thank you so much.
    Kathleen
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2019
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 17, 2019

    Your score report should also break down your multiple choice score by domain: did you get +++ each in science and math, or what?
     
  4. PurpleCat

    PurpleCat Rookie

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    Dec 17, 2019

    Hello,
    I received the '+++' in both math and science in the multiple choice.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 17, 2019

    PurpleCat, how are you generally as a taker of multiple-choice tests?
     
  6. PurpleCat

    PurpleCat Rookie

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    Dec 17, 2019

    Generally, I'm fine. I'm obviously not strong in math or science, though. No problems with the other two subsets.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 19, 2019

    What have you been using to study?
     
  8. PurpleCat

    PurpleCat Rookie

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    Dec 19, 2019

    I have been using studydotcom, Khan Academy, and a little of Barron's.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 23, 2019

    Are those sources making sense to you? Are they engaging you? Or are you finding that you get ready to study, and suddenly realize that, say, the sink needs cleaning out again (and again and again)?
     
  10. PurpleCat

    PurpleCat Rookie

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    Dec 23, 2019

    No, I've felt very engaged with the materials I've used. I just bought the Cliff's book and I'll start with that, too. I'm not writing in-depth enough for the people scoring my test. I need to figure out how to give them what they want to see.
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 23, 2019

    Okay, here's a question:

    CoCoRaHS is the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow network, by which community members report precipitation from neighborhoods in which National Weather Service personnel are not located. These community members report snowfall and snow depth, but they also report what the National Weather Service calls the "melted precipitation equivalent", by melting snow or hail down to water. Use this information to answer the following questions:
    Why does it make sense to report the melted precipitation equivalent of snowfall or hail?
    Rashid lives in Sacramento, Cara in Truckee, and Wayne in Winnemucca, Nevada. After the most recent storm, who do you expect to report the highest precipitation or melted precipitation equivalent, and why? Which of them do you expect to report the lowest precipitation or melted precipitation equivalent, and why?
     
  12. PurpleCat

    PurpleCat Rookie

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    Dec 24, 2019

    It makes sense to report the melted precipitation equivalent of snowfall or hail because without those measurements, the potential water would not be included in that particular area's data. The highest precipitation or melted precipitation equivalent among the areas of Truckee, CA, Winnemucca, Nevada and Sacramento CA would be Truckee, because of Truckee's location (Sierra Nevada mountain range) and known annual melted precipitation equivalent. Winnemucca Nevada is not located in a mountainous region, and Sacramento is a valley region with very little melted precipitation. Sacramento would have the lowest melted precipitation because of its low elevation and temperate and mild conditions.
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 25, 2019

    Most CSET questions ask one to address multiple issues and apply principles to specific cases. This one's no exception. You're on something of the right track, and your response is appropriately framed to a fellow adult, but I see why you're getting k's.

    Your first sentence: "It makes sense to report the melted precipitation equivalent of snowfall or hail because without those measurements, the potential water would not be included in that particular area's data."
    This sentence presupposes that if melted precipitation equivalent isn't being reported for a given place, no precipitation is being reported. That would be a reasonable assumption - except that my question clearly states that BOTH melted precipitation equivalent AND snowfall depth are being reported. Why would it make sense to report both? (Hint: Think about measuring water versus snow.)

    Your second sentence: "The highest precipitation or melted precipitation equivalent among the areas of Truckee, CA, Winnemucca, Nevada and Sacramento CA would be Truckee, because of Truckee's location (Sierra Nevada mountain range) and known annual melted precipitation equivalent." You're right that Truckee gets more total precipitation, and you're right that the Sierras have something to do with it - but your sentence then says that Truckee gets more precipitation because mountains get more melted precipitation. What is it about mountains that makes for more precipitation of all kinds?

    Your third and fourth sentences claim that Sacramento gets less precipitation than Winnemucca. But there's a general weather phenomenon that you're not taking into account. Use your favorite app or Wikipedia to look up average annual precipitation in Sacto and Winnemucca, then have a look at this link (https://www.windows2universe.org/earth/Atmosphere/precipitation/rain_shadow.html), which is a little primitive in its graphics but quick-loading and to the point.

    Try again, please.

    Test taker hint: If the question asks you what Rashid in Sactramento, Cara in Truckee, and Wayne in Winnemucca are going to report, it's a good idea to respond in terms of what Rashid in Sacramento, Cara in Truckee, and Wayne in Winnemucca are going to report.
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  14. PurpleCat

    PurpleCat Rookie

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    Dec 28, 2019

    Teachergroupie,
    I have re-submitted my answer. It was actually quite interesting. One thing that sticks in my mind is how can I possibly know all of the random information such as this? You directed me to look this information up-I don't have that luxury during the CSET, so I'm stuck with not having enough information.

    Why does it make sense to report the melted precipitation equivalent of snowfall or hail?
    Rashid lives in Sacramento, Cara in Truckee, and Wayne in Winnemucca, Nevada. After the most recent storm, who do you expect to report the highest precipitation or melted precipitation equivalent, and why? Which of them do you expect to report the lowest precipitation or melted precipitation equivalent, and why?


    It makes sense to report the melted precipitation equivalent of snowfall or hail, because of certain geographical phenomenons located in such regions as Winnemucca, Nevada. Wayne in Winnemucca will likely report very little precipitation due to what is known as a "Rain Shadow" which creates very dry regions, and receives much less precipitation and cloud cover. On the other hand, Winnemucca freezes every month and has a annual snowfall of 20.9 inches, the precipitation annually is only 8.28, so including the calculations for that melted equivalent makes sense to give Winnemucca a fair measurement. Trhe snowfall in this area is most likely a dry snow, and the water content is not going to be a wet snow. Wayne of Winnemucca will report the least amount of precipitation.

    Rashid lives in Sacramento which has an annual precipitation measurement of 18.52 inches, with no melted equivalent, with the exception of hail that melts upon contact. Sacramento has been dubbed the "Sunniest place on earth" for a reason. Rashid is not going to be able to report as much as Cara, however.

    Cara from Truckee will likely be able to report the highest precipitation from the storm due to her location, which is located in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Truckee receives 200 inches of snow per year, so the likelihood of Truckee having the the most precipitation for this storm seems reasonable.
     
  15. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 31, 2019

    Scorers won't expect you to quote specific precipitation amounts for specific places, PurpleCat. They will however quite reasonably expect you to know or to be able to reason out the following, based on general principles:

    (a) The reason that one reports both snowfall depth and melted precipitation equivalent is that snow is much less dense than rain, so reporting only snowfall would overstate the amount of H2O that reaches the ground. (So you know, this follows in part from the general principle that ice is less dense than water and snow is less dense than solid ice: a less dense substance takes up more volume per mass than does a more dense substance. Geographic location makes no difference: this is simple reasoning from knowledge of the properties of H2O in its liquid and solid forms.)

    (b) Total precipitation is less along a coastal plain than in the mountains (and, for our purposes, Sacramento functions as a coastal area: you can thank the Delta for that), because warm air can hold more moisture than cold air does. As the warm moist air mass moves toward the mountains, it rises - I will tell you, though you need not tell the scorers, that there's nowhere else for that air mass to go when it reaches the mountains but up. As the air mass rises, it cools, and the moisture in the air mass condenses into cloud and then falls as rain or snow or hail. Once that air mass crosses the mountains, it holds less moisture, and that's one explanation for the "rain shadow" you mentioned; the other is that the air mass will lose elevation, and in falling it will warm up, which means it's again able to hold more moisture without that moisture precipitating. I could write the same question with Santa Monica, Cajon Pass, and Las Vegas, or San Diego, the Laguna Mountains, and the Coachella Valley, or any other three places, and as long as the question gives you as test taker enough hints to be able to figure out which location is coastal, which in the mountains, and which in the rain shadow, your answer should lay out exactly the same process.
     
  16. PurpleCat

    PurpleCat Rookie

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    Jan 1, 2020

    TeacherGroupie,
    Thank you so much for all your feedback. I appreciate your time.
    Kathleen
     

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