Creative Way to Teach Multiplication?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Ms. I, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Jan 19, 2007

    Does anyone have any creative ideas to teach single digit multiplication for special ed? When I was a child, we just had to memorize the times tables, but does anyone know a creative activity lesson that lasts about 45 minutes? If you know of any websites that explain a fun game and/or lesson plan, please post them here! Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    Do you have your children all day? or only 45 minutes?
     
  4. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Flashcards and drill drill and drill some more.

    Mad Minutes ---We start them at the beginning of the third grade. Addition, next subtraction and when we start multiplication we don't give any more add and sub Mad Minutes. Students must get 20 correct in one minute. This makes students stop counting on their fingers, using point math and number lines. If they get 20 correct they get a piece of candy from the candy jar. (a small piece of individual wrapped candy) They like those fruit square things You get a package of them and put in
    a pretty jar with a lid. Can't think of the name of them. We use
    flashcard drills. Sort out the 0s and they must get them all correct in 40 seconds. And they get a piece of candy. Than we do the 1s in 40 seconds and earn a piece of candy. Oh, yes they are easy, but they had success and you have their attention and you are building self esteem. After we go thru all the flashcards including 10s. We go to the Mad Minutes. Get gumball machine and gumballs at the Dollar Store cheap. If they improve by 3 they get another gumball We do a five minute timing on one hundred facts at the beginning of the year and at the end of each grading period. These are test and stay in their personal file folders in the teachers file cabinet. Now when we start multiplication facts. We do the flashcard thing except this time we work of a banana split party. 0s=napkin, 1s=spoon, 2s=dish, 3s=banana 4s= ice cream 5s=toppings chocolate, strawberry and butterscotch, 6s= crushed Oreo
    cookies 7s=whipped topping 8s= sprinkles 9s=a cherry on top. 10s
    = nuts.... Get at Dollar Store also cheap. They earn a certificate at the end of year assembly with the number of facts they mastered in one minute in each addition, multiplication and subtraction.

    Put the facts on a beach ball from the Dollar Store and whatever their thumb is on when they catch the ball, they say the fact and answer
     
  5. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Try www.multiplication.com.....


    I just did a search. I don't know anything about it, other than I noticed there were games.
     
  6. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Only 45 minutes.
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    If theyhaven't already done the conceptual practice with manipulatives, do that first. Use counters and demonstrate arrays. You can get creative and count into various containers or onto a workmat with a grid on it. Make booklets with the facts illustrated, etc. Make sure they get used to thinking 3 groups of 7 for 3 x 7.

    When I tutor special needs kids in multiplication, we play games.

    War is the obvious one.

    Dice games are simple and fun. Pair up kids and have them take turns rolling two standard (or polyhedron) dice. The opponent must check the other player's answer. Provide one of those bendable plastic multiplication charts for additional tactile involvement.

    Ask a math fact, toss a ball, recipient must answer before returning the toss.

    Similarly, ask a fact, recipient gets a chance to toss a ball (or bean bag) into a bucket. One point for correct answer, one for a basket.

    Play multiplication bingo. You can buy a boxed game, make the boards yourself, or have the kids make their own. I used a 4x4 grid. The boards can be made with the products or the factors. Use correct terms like, "The product of 6 and 8" when calling to familiarize them naturally with the vocab. We always play for small candies ....... multiplication can be used for any subject. I put a list of 20 responses on the board and let the kids choose any 16 of them to place on their own boards which they make on individual whiteboards.

    Kids love to write on whiteboards and it makes even regular drill more fun.

    Have a problem of the day related to the facts you are studying.
    Involve the kids in your story problems. "Today, I see 5 kids wearing two black shoes each. How many black shoes do I see?"

    Skip count aloud to music. We used to use the simple tune, Frere Jacques. I'm not fond of the songs and chants with words in them as I've found them confusing. We just sang the multiples. I just adapted the rhythm to the beats of the song. (For 5th grade, we sing the state capitals to the tune of The Itsy Bitsy Spider and the presidents to the tune of Frere Jacques. They memorized all the presidents in order in one week this way. Every morning we sing one or the other.

    Have fun.
     
  8. Carolyn

    Carolyn Rookie

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    The Touch Math program has wonderful posters for multiplication and age appropriate mult. songs to go along with the poster. My sp. ed. kids loved them last year as they learned their times tables.
     
  9. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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  10. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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  11. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    45 minutes is always tough...

    One trick is for them to find different ways to add in multiples. Because of football, I knew the sevens multiples by the age of 5 or six, and I didn't even know I was learning, I thought I was just having fun. Games are always great, sharing these games with the parents is wonderful also. I am always for service learning projects so I am curious about what the class' interests are. If you can unite them in a project then the manipulatives that they use can have meaning. Sounds like your doing single subject which has many frustrations. But perhaps you can work with one of your students other teachers... Service learning means a lot more work for the teacher but the learning potential is endless.
     
  12. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Are you looking for ways for them to memorize the tables? Or are you looking for a way to introduce the concept?
     
  13. born2teach84

    born2teach84 Comrade

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    the book on multiplication.com is GREAT my kiddos love it and it helps them learn their tables in a fun creative way! They get a kick out of reading the stories and since it uses words that connect with the numbers! ITS GREAT!
     
  14. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    Using playing cards, with values being given to the Kings, Queens, Jacks of 10, Aces being 2 or 5 or whatever multiple you are working on. Each child is dealt 5 cards and the rest go face down on the pile. The object of the game is get as high a multiple as possible, starting with first two cards in their hand. They have to lay the two cards down, state the fact and the answer, and then they need to add their scores on their own (you can get into the upper 100s when playing with 4 children in a group, so this is a good way to reinforce those addition skills, too!) Once they do that, they pick two more cards from the pile and the next person goes. If they are incorrect with their answer, the next person can get to answer their mult. fact, and get those points, too. My third graders love this game!
     
  15. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2007

    A refinement on the dice game that 'daisy mentions is to visit a store that caters to people who play role-playing games and get dice that have more (or fewer) sides. In addition the standard six-sided dice, which of course are cubes, you can get four-sided dice, eight-sided dice, twelve-sided dice, and twenty-sided dice - and not only can you now have kids play with bigger factors in multiplication, you've also got a dandy set of manipulatives for Platonic solids (solids whose faces are all identical and regular).

    (Yes, there are also ten-sided dice. No, they're not Platonic solids: the faces are kite-shaped rather than regular squares or triangles or pentagons.)
     
  16. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    That's what I was referring to when I mentioned polyhedron dice. Maybe that's not the right term. I have all kinds in my classroom (and dice with fractions, symbols, integers, blank ones, ones with parts of speech on them).
     
  17. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I call them polyhedron dice as well--I got mine through an educational supply store. I have a huge supply of dice as well--I just can't resist! ;) (My students' favourites are huge foamy ones--their sides are more than 6 inches in length).
     
  18. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    You did mention polyhedron dice, 'daisy. I'll just, um, slink off in a corner and have a know-it-some-corrected moment... snif...

    Whatever they're called, these dice are very cool, and the standard-sized ones with standard numbers just might be cheaper through a game store than they are in a teacher supply store.
     
  19. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    A polyhedron die by any other name would .......still be cool!

    Sometimes when the kids get rambunctious with them I ask them to roll the dice in little tubs so they don't go flying all over the place.
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    They're also first-rate for teaching probability.
     
  21. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    True. I found a really nice wooden pinball type of thing that the kids (and I) love. Works great for P.
     
  22. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    The kids I subbed for loved around the world with flashcards.
     
  23. Miss Starr

    Miss Starr Companion

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    Does anyone know the doubles multiplication song/poem? The only verse I remember is "I ate and I ate and got sick on the floor" is 8x8=64
     
  24. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Thanks so much guys for all your help!
     
  25. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    The only one I remember is 6 and 8 went on a date and they came back as 48 - works every year!
     
  26. lisap

    lisap Companion

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    My students like the "Product Game".

    Supplies: 2 players, 2 paper clips, 2 colored highlighters, game board

    Game board: I make a game board with all possible combinations of answers for the multiplication facts 1-9. It is set up like a Grid (Bingo card style with out the letters on top, 6 by 6 - I think. . .). The digits 1-9 are listed on the bottom under the grid.

    Process: One player places a paper clip on any number, the next player places another paper clip on a number of his choice, then shades the product on the grid. The first player moves one (just one) paper clip to a number of their choice (can put two paper clips on the same number ex: 5x5). The goal is to shade 4 in a row (up, down or diagonal). Students love to try to "block" the opponent.
     
  27. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    In one of my math books from college they used a clock to teach 5's!
     
  28. brigidy

    brigidy Comrade

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    I have a cute comic strip that hangs on my wall that says..." It worked! I told them the multiplication table was none of their business and they learned it within the week!
     
  29. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I love it!
     
  30. lehcar1021

    lehcar1021 Rookie

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    Sundae Outline?

    Does anyone have the actual outline/picture of the ice cream sundae for the multiplication sundae party? When I was in elementary school, we worked towards a sundae party, but each of us had a picture of an ice cream sundae with a bowl, spoon, ice cream, and toppings. As we earned an item, we got to color in the item we earned.
    Anyone have a graphic or outline??? THANKS!
     

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