Crash course in ADD/ADHD

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by lemonhead, Aug 26, 2008.

  1. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Aug 26, 2008

    Hi friends

    I need a website that gives advice on how to work with ADD/ADHD kids in the classroom. I know there are books but I really need something quicker and more concise. The cliff notes.

    If you don't have a website but can give me some advice please do so. Lower elementary.

    Lemon
     
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  3. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Aug 26, 2008

    I have ADD. It's like having a brain that runs in fast forward. ADHD is the same, except the body tags along with the brain.

    I once watched a video on teaching kids with ADHD. 90% of the strategies were things that all good teachers do anyway. "Write directions on the board, using different colored markers for each task."

    Basically a person with ADD lacks internal structure. So either they or someone else has to create those structures. For example, I really should set a timer right now so that I don't sit here forever writing about ADD.

    A few quick strategies.

    Break longer assignments into smaller tasks and set a timer and tell the child to complete the smaller task before the timer goes off.

    People often think ADD students need more time for an assignment. I actually thing the opposite is true. We work better under pressure.

    Allow them to stand at their seat if they can do so without bothering anyone.

    People with ADD will often "hyperfocus." That means they will zero in on one thing and ignore everything else. That's how you get parents who say "I don't understand how my kid doesn't focus. He focuses on video games just fine."

    Well, what you need to do is use the hyperfocusing to your advantage. The timer is a good way to do that.

    Finally, there's a difference between a child with ADD and a child with other learned (environmental) behavior problems. It's quite simple. The ADD child will not respond to rewards or consequences whereas the child with learned behavior problems will. Most emotional (like "oppositional defiant disorder") issues that ADD/ADHD students (and adults) have come from the frustration of not being able to hold it together long enough to get that reward or avoid the consequence that the teacher has held in front of the rest of the students in order to motivate them to behave or do their work.
     
  4. MissHunny

    MissHunny Comrade

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    Aug 26, 2008

    pm me your email address and ill send you a short pamphlet
     
  5. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Aug 26, 2008

  6. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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  7. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Aug 26, 2008

    ADHD: Stay consistent with verbal reminders and use proximity techniques. Do not expect them to write down everything, even though they may have the thoughts running through their heads. Let them use tape recorders or sound recording programs, if need be. Keep directions at three steps, and be repetitive, if need be. Vary the voices you speak in to capture their attention. Stay in consistent touch with the parents, and motivate both the parent and child.
     
  8. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Aug 27, 2008

    Thank you everyone. This is great advice. I don't want to write about these students here but their types of disorder are different, some are impulsive and some inattentive. I tried the proximity strategy yesterday it really helped with a couple of them. I have one that doesn't pay attention AT ALL, not bad, ust out there.

    RW/S I'll check those sites out today. I could really go for your avatar right about now.
     
  9. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Aug 27, 2008

    Some different scents will help. I can't remember which ones. Also velvety type material for them to touch sometimes calms, food! I had one student when he would start to get out of control I would give him a few crackers and he was right back on track!
    You will learn their needs as the year goes on. Just write down what works for each kid (if you have a lot of them). I was told i have the special ed cluster this year in my room. That is going to be a lot of fun when half of them do not have IEPS yet!
     
  10. HollyC

    HollyC New Member

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    Aug 27, 2008

    For some kids with ADD/ADHD, they may appear to not be focused yet they actually are, they just have difficulty looking at you and listening (and processing what you're saying) at the same time. You can try to sit on the childs left hand side in thier peripherial vision when addressing them - they tend to focus better then as well. Other kids need tactiles or 'calming foci', things like marbles or a stress ball, help the child focus as well. With these, I find it's best to have the child with ADD/ADHD having a buddy each week, and the buddy gets the same tactile. These reduces 'jealousy' amongst peers, and helps foster social skills. Also, look for Tony Attwood and Sue Larkey for other tips. Good luck!
     
  11. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    The last site is a lengthy report in PDF form, but I thought it looked like pretty useful. It might be easier to peruse this one throughout the year or when you have more time on your hands. The others looked like short articles that could be quickly scanned. And I could use one of my avatars right now too, but I'm trying to stay away from frappacchinos. My waist line doesn't need them. So I live vicariously through my avatar.:rolleyes:
     
  12. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    This is true for one of them. I am going to PM you.
     
  13. ladycajun1105

    ladycajun1105 Rookie

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    Sep 1, 2008

    This sounds very interesting. I have two students on meds for ADD/ADHD and one that NEEDS TO BE ON MEDS (Poor Child). I have one child who is always out there in space. I don't know how to get her on task. I have another who just wants to play with his notebook. Another who loves to get out of his desk and slide on the floor upon returning to his desk. I have a constant talker, who will talk to anyone around her but not loud as to cause too much attention to her. This is my first year and sometimes I think they gave me all these students to see if I could handle them. Anyways, they are in first grade, should they have IEP's? I only have 14 students, none are below level so I think that is a good thing. Sorry for such a long message.
     
  14. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    ANother reason they can tune into video games is because it does go faster--lots of varying activity.
     
  15. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Look up a guy named Russell Barkley. He's written books about ADHD and has one about adhd in the classroom. I bought it for my son's teacher and it's been very helpful to me as well.

    I got my copy at the local library.
     
  16. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    No website, but tips garnered from experience with my daughter:

    1. Structure, structure and more structure - they have to know what they are supposed to be doing at all times, and what they are not supposed to be doing as well.

    2. Follow-through - make them accountable for their actions! If any student will get into trouble (or garner praise) for their actions, then the exact same rules need to apply to your ADD/ADHD students. (no matter what the parents say)

    3. Sometimes putting their assignments on a timer can help a lot, because they have trouble focusing.

    4. My daughter's pediatrician explained the problem this way: Imagine, if you will, sending a 2 year old child to clean up a room that is a disaster, but giving the child no help or guidance. The child is easily overwhelmed, right? When the right medication / techniques are used, the AHDH/ADD child can now go into that room and eat the elephant one bite at a time. They are not so overwhelmed.

    5. Squeezy balls sometimes help. I gave one of my 3rd graders one, and he was able to focus much better!

    6. I agree about the proximity methods. Sometimes just a light touch on the shoulder is all it takes to get them refocused.

    7. Don't offer them too many choices. By limiting their choices, you are reducing the chances of meltdowns. I once offered my daughter the choice of one of three dresses at a store. She couldn't do it. She literally sat down & started bawling. This was when she was four and unmedicated, but it is a good illustration.
     
  17. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    WOW our classes sound the same!

    Thank you Tracy and Nana.

    I can't remember if I mentioned this but I am going to change a few desks either next week or the week after. I think that will help. I have been really praising them if they are on task and put up some of their work. One of the boys needs confidence boosting. I let him help kids with their math worksheet on Thursday and he was beaming! YES! He really did well for me that day.

    Thanks for all your suggestions. I am not at wits end my any means but I just want these kiddos to have a great year. My own son was ADHD-very impulsive so I have experience with it, just not in the classroom:eek:

    :love:
    Lemon
     
  18. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Sep 6, 2008

    Thanks Sarge!
     

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