Course Syllabi

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Brendan, Jul 30, 2007.

  1. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jul 30, 2007

    I was thinking it would be a good idea for us experienced teachers to share our syllabi with those new teachers and for those new teachers to pst thiers here for advice. So here is mine:

    Course Syllabus MHS Social Studies Department
    Western Civilization I Honors 2007-2008

    Instructor: Room:
    E-mail: Phone:

    Course Description:
    This course will give students an historical survey of the development of Western Civilization from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment. Learning strategies based on performance objectives stress the development of critical thinking skills and the clarification of values important to a democratic society. Students can also expect to refine and improve writing and research skills, including the reading of various primary documents. Substantive outside class reading and writing will be required at the honors level. Students recommended for the honors level should be earning at least a 90 in 8th Grade Social Studies and demonstrate exceptional reading, writing, and critical thinking skills.

    Major Course Units:

    • The Study of History
    • Ancient Rome and Greece
    • Comparative Religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
    • Communalism to Feudalism: The Middle Ages
    • Feudalism to Individualism: The High Middle Ages
    • The Reformation and Counter Reformation
    • The Renaissance
    • The Age of Exploration
    • The Scientific Revolution
    • The Enlightenment


    Course Goals:
    • To organize oneself and one’s materials.
    • To learn how to properly write a large paper for history.
    • To understand the concept of cause and effect. As well as the effect Western Civilization has had on the United States.
    • To examine and understand the similarities and differences between the religions of Islam, Judaism, and Christianity.
    • To understand the past social systems of Europe and how they developed into the social system of the United States today.
    • To analyze the reasons behind the Catholic Reformation and the new religions created by it.
    • To understand the impacts that the Renaissance, Age of Exploration, and Scientific Revolution have had on our world.
    • To understand the ethics of various societies and religions.

    Student Supplies:
    Students are required to come prepared to class each day with the following supplies:
    • 1.5-2 inch 3-ring binder for this class only (Make sure it will last the whole year.)
    • 20 Plastic Sheet Protectors
    • A supply of 8.5” by 11” loose-leaf paper for binder.
    • Student Agenda
    • Optional: Crayons, Colored Pencils, Rulers, Markers, Art Paper, etc. for special projects (I only have a limited supply.)

    Late Work and Make-up Work:
    Students have one week to make up all missed work due to an absence, after that is a zero. This includes quizzes, tests, and assignments. Please make arrangements to see me when you are absent. Late work not due to an excused absence looses 10% per day late. Assignments turned in that same school day, but no when the assignment was collected, loose 5%.A note on plagiarism: Plagiarism will not be tolerated. In the even of plagiarism, parents and the administration will be notified. Students will be able to make up the assignment for a 30% reduction in grade. Second offenses result in an automatic zero.

    Attendance:
    Please maintain regular attendance to class, often our activities cannot be recreated for makeup work. Keep in mind that after 9 absences (in one term) from this curse you will begin to loose credit and 4 tardies total an absence .Any student not in their seat by the tardy bell will be marked absent and if they come in after that they will be marked tardy.

    Behavior and Conduct:
    I expect students to behave in a proper manner by respecting all school rules, property, teachers, and other students. Please no swearing, touching materials without permission, writing on my board with out permission, or going in my desk. Violations in school rules or disrespectful remarks towards anyone or anything will result in a detention or possible referral. We do a lot of fun hands on activities, projects and games in this course, if you do not behave appropriately during our fun activities, we will stop and go straight to book work, end of story! On a more positive note, I do hand out candy, prizes, stickers, and homework passes to good students!

    Grading:
    Course grades will be determined using the following categories:

    -Tests: 40%
    -Quizzes: 20%
    -Homework and Class work: 30%
    -Unit Binder Checks 10%


    Each quarter grade of this course is worth 40% of the overall course grade with the final exam being weighted as 20% of the overall course grade.

    Tests are weighted as 40% of the term grade, major projects and papers also fit into this category. Students can expect a test or major assignment (projects/papers) every 1-2 weeks, with about 6-8 major assignments per quarter. A day of review is also done before each test. Tests usually compose of multiple choice, modified true/false, identifications, a few extra credit, and short answer questions with one essay question. All test grades, including projects and papers that are graded using a rubric are worth 100 points.

    Quizzes are weighed as 20% of the term grade; you can expect approximately 1-2 quizzes within each unit, medium sized projects and essays also fit into this category. Regular quizzes consist of five open response questions that cover a set of course notes. Quiz grades are also out of 100 points. Quizzes can also be announced or unannounced.

    Homework and classwork is weighted 30% of the term grade, with small projects and essays also fitting into this category. Homework is either checked or collected on the day it is due. Regular assignments will be spot checked out of 10 points, while graded assignments are usually in the 20-40 point range. Classwork will sometimes be checked or graded, but is subject to the same point values. A weekly syllabus will be handed out for students to consult with regarding assignments, due dates, and other information.

    Unit binder checks are weighted as 10% of your tem grade. You are expected to maintain you binder according to the posted table of contents on the board. Please keep all papers in this order and use your sheet protectors to hold each unit’s cover page. Following each unit’s cover page should be that units table of contents page listing all assignments for that unit. Binders will be graded at the end of each unit.

    Miscellaneous Information:
    • Never put anything on my desk, ever!
    • If you are not in the room and need to turn an assignment in place it in the “turn-in” box.
    • I will do my best to return daily assignments and quizzes by the next class period, smaller projects/essays within two days, tests within three days, and larger papers/projects within a week.
    • Respect me and I will respect you.
    • Participate in all classroom activities (we do a lot of act it outs and plays!) and your grade will be affected positively.
    • I revere the right to add to this syllabus at any time.
    • I will go over the layout of our classroom and a basic tour during our first class meetings.
     
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  3. Leedy

    Leedy Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2007

    thanks you gave me some great ideas
    leedy
     
  4. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Jul 30, 2007

    Here is the syllabus for Introduction to College Writing I. I have separate syllabi for each of my courses.

    ___ ____ Community College

    I. Course Identification

    Semester: Summer 2007
    Course Title: Introduction to College Writing I
    Course Number: ENG 024 Section: 71
    Number of Credits: 3 Number of Contact Hours: 3

    Days: T/Th Time: 6:00 – 9:00 Room: CLC100

    Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment. (ASSETT Writing 32-37, COMPASS Writing 23-51).

    Program: Academic Skills Advancement Division: General Education

    Instructor: Jane Goodwin Phone: 277- 9251
    E-Mail: jegoodwi@ivytech.edu
    Mailbox: CLC workroom

    Office Hours: M/W – 5:00 – 5:30; T/Th – 8:30 – 8:50; 5:00 -5:30
    Date of Last Revision: 4/6/06
    Effective Date of this Revision: 4/25/07

    II. Course Description

    Enables the beginning college writers to develop control of the writing process through writings that are focused, organized, and well developed. Requires students to demonstrate proficiency in basic standard writing conventions, including grammar and mechanics.

    III. Course Objectives

    At the successful completion of this course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate control of the writing process as evidenced by writing that is focused, organized, and well developed.
    2. Demonstrate increased self-confidence as a writer.
    3. Demonstrate competence in sentence structure and paragraph development.
    4. Demonstrate and apply the revision process.
    5. Demonstrate proficiency in the application of grammar and mechanics in the writing process.

    IV. Course Content

    Topical areas of study include—

    The writing process including prewriting, drafting, editing, revising, voice, audience, purpose, conventions of standard written English, introduction to plagiarism, organized writing and topics, supporting and concluding statements.



    V. Course Calendar

    June 11-17 Chapter 1 – Exploring the Writing Process
    Chapter 2 – Prewriting to Generate Ideas Chapter 6—Subjects and Verbs
    Chapter 7—Avoiding Sentence Fragments
    Quizzes: Chapters 6 & 7
    June 18-24 Chapter 3 – Developing Effective Paragraphs
    Chapter 4 – Improving Your Paragraphs
    Chapter 5 – Moving from Paragraph to Essay
    Chapter 8 – Present Tense (Agreement)
    Quiz: Chapter 8
    Reading: “A Homemade Education” p. 393
    Writing Assignment #1 Due (“A Homemade Education”)
    June 25-July 1 Chapter 9 – Past Tense
    Chapter 10 – The Past Participle
    Chapter 11 – Progressive Tenses
    Chapter 12 – Fixed-From Helping
    Quizzes: Chapter 9, 10, 11, 12
    Reading: “In this Arranged Marriage, Love Came Later” p. 417
    Rough Draft due for Paper #2
    Writing Assignment #2 Due (“In This Arranged Marriage…”)
    July 2-8 Chapter 13 – Coordination
    Chapter 14 – Subordination
    Chapter 15– Avoiding Run-Ons and Comma Splices
    Chapter 26 -- Capitalization
    Quiz: Chapters 13,14, 15, 26
    Reading: “The Gift” p. 409
    Rough Draft due for Assignment #3
    Writing Assignment # 3 Due (“The Gift”)
    *July 4th No Class
    July 9-15 Chapter 16– Semicolons and Conjunctive Adverbs
    Chapter 17- Relative Pronouns
    Chapter 18 -- -ing Modifiers
    Chapter 19 -- Nouns
    Quizzes: Chapters 16, 17, 18, 19
    Reading Assignments: “For Career Insight, Try Talking to the Neighbors” p. 377
    Rough Draft Due for Assignment # 4
    Writing Assignment #4 Due (“For Career Insight”)
    July 16*-22 Chapter 20 – Pronouns
    Chapter 21 – Adjectives & Adverbs
    Chapter 22 – Prepositions
    Chapter 27 – Commas
    Quizzes: Chapters 20,21,22,27
    Reading: “Emotional Intelligence” p. 424
    Rough Draft Due for Assignment No. 5
    Writing Assignment # 5 Due (“Emotional Intelligence”)
    July 23-29 Chapter 23 – Consistent Tense
    Chapter 24 – Consistent Person
    Chapter 25 – Parallelism
    Chapter 28 – Apostrophes
    Quizzes: Chapters 23,, 24, 25, 28
    Reading: “Another Road Hog with Too much Oink” p. 388
    Rough Draft Due for Assignment # 6
    Writing Assignment # 6 Due (“Another Road Hog with Too Much Oink”)
    July 30- Aug.6 Chapter 29– Direct & Indirect Quotations
    Quiz: Chapter 29
    Reading: “Four Directions” p. 422
    Rough Draft Due for Assignment # 7
    Writing Assignment # 7 Due (“Four Directions”) Grammar Review
    Final Exam

    *Last day to drop a full-term course with an automatic “W” is July 16th.
    Please Note: This calendar gives an overview of the direction of our study. However, it is tentative and subject to changes which will be announced in class. If you miss class, it is your responsibility to get the assignment from the instructor or another student before the next class meeting.

    VI. Course Requirements

    ENG 024 meets twice a week for 6 hours. In-class presentations, discussion, and group activities are an important part of this course and cannot be made up. Therefore, regular attendance is required.

    Come to class on time and do not expect to leave early. Do not schedule any other appointments during this time. If you miss more than fifteen minutes of class, if will count as an absence.

    Class attendance constitutes 15% of your grade. All students begin the semester with 100 attendance points. Students may miss up to two classes without any deduction from that total. After two absences, there will be a deduction of 15 points for each class missed.

    All cell phones are to be turned off during class.

    Assignments are due on the day assigned unless other arrangements are made ahead of time. Assignments are to be typed and handed in along with a rough draft. Both should be in a pocket folder. Late papers are not accepted.

    If you wish to improve the grade on a paper, you may rewrite that paper and hand it in, along with the original paper, for a better grade. The grade on the rewritten paper will replace the previous grade. All rewrites are due within one week of the day the paper is returned. I will not accept rewrites after that date.

    Be sure to bring materials and text to class.

    VII. Required Text, Materials, Tools

    Fawcett & Sandberg, Grassroots With Readings, Eighth Edition. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2005.

    American Heritage Dictionary. (Paperback Edition)

    VIII. Course Grading

    A = 90 – 100 Papers = 70% of grade
    B = 80– 89 Quizzes = 10% of grade
    C = 70 – 79 Attendance & Participation = 15 % of grade
    D = 60 – 69 Final Exam: 5%
    F = less than 60

    You must have a “C” in order to pass an ASA course.

    IX. Behavior Statement

    Students should always conduct themselves in a respectful manner. No conduct will be tolerated that might endanger or threaten anyone in the class. Disruptive behavior, substance abuse, downgrading or disparaging remarks, and any other behavior that shows a lack of respect for the instructor or other students, will not be tolerated. At the instructor’s discretion, a student causing problems will be asked to leave the class for the session. If a student persists in causing problems, further disciplinary action may be taken, up to and including dismissal from class and/ or the College.


    X. Academic Honesty Statement:

    The College is committed to academic integrity in all its practices. The faculty value intellectual integrity and a high standard of academic conduct. Activities that violate academic integrity undermine the quality and diminish the value of educational achievement.

    Cheating on papers, tests, or other academic works is a violation of College rules. No student shall engage in behavior that, in the judgment of the instructor of the class, may be construed as cheating. This may include, but is not limited to, plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty such as the acquisition without permission of tests or other academic materials and/or distribution of these materials and other academic work. This includes students who aid and abet as well as those who attempt such behavior.

    The instructor reserves the right to use the resources of the college to check student work for plagiarism.

    Copyright Statement

    Students shall adhere to the laws governing the use of copyrighted materials. They must ensure that their activities comply with fair use and in no way infringe on the copyright or other proprietary rights of others and that the materials used and developed at Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana contain nothing unlawful, unethical, or libelous, and do not constitute any violation of any right of privacy.


    XI. ADA Statement:

    ___ ____ Community College seeks to provide reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with documented disabilities. If you need an accommodation because of a documented disability, please contact the Office of Disability Support Services.

    If you will require assistance during an emergency evacuation, notify your instructor immediately. Look for evacuation procedures posted in your classroom.

    The above course schedule and procedures in this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.
     
  5. mommee03

    mommee03 Companion

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    Jul 30, 2007

    This is really helpful. Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  6. Lyquidphyre

    Lyquidphyre Comrade

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    Jul 31, 2007

    In addition to a course syllabus, what about a weekly one? I remember having an AP teaching give out a weekly one that talked about what we were doing and what things were assigned/due. Do you think that would be "putting too much on my plate"...
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 31, 2007

    Liquid,

    I think that, as a first year teacher, you might want to think twice here. Once kids see it in writing, they tend to think it's set in stone. That first year you learn a lot about timing: some lessons take half the time you expected, others triple what you had planned.
     
  8. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

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    Jul 31, 2007

    I don't send home a traditional syllabus. All of my policies, standard rubrics, and assignment directions go in the first part of my interactive notebook. (It's 15 half pages, so I won't post all of it :rolleyes: ) Here is the syllabusesque part (although the formatting didn't really transfer):

    WELCOME TO SIXTH GRADE HUMANITIES!

    “Humanities” is the study of man’s past achievements through history, art, and philosophy/religion. Topics of study range from early man to the discovery of the New World. This notebook is a customized guide that specifically addresses the South Carolina social studies standards. The notebook we create in class is the student’s best resource.


    TEACHER: Mrs. __________, Team ______________
    PHONE: xxx-yyyy

    EMAIL: _______________@_____________

    WEB: http://

    Snipped Address – Same site but shorter and easier to type:
    http://snipurl.com/___________________


    TEXTBOOK
    Book: The World (Scott Foresman) Cost: 55.00

    ____________ School District has implemented a new way to issue textbooks. Students check out a textbook the same way they check out library books. Every textbook has a unique bar code. If the book becomes unidentifiable, the student will have to purchase the book. I strongly encourage students to put a book cover on their books (not the adhesive, sticky kind as this may damage the bar code) and to keep their books in a safe place at home. I will have a classroom set of textbooks for students to use in the classroom, so students will not have to carry their humanities textbook back and forth from home.

    NOTEBOOK REFERENCE PAGES

    TOPIC #
    Topics of Study/Standards
    Grading: Weights and Categories
    Missing and Late Work
    Assignment Rubrics
    Extra Credit
    Directions for Notebook Assignments

    I have reviewed my child’s interactive notebook introductory pages and am aware that this is his/her major tool for success in Humanities class this year.


    Parent Signature Date

    GRADING: WEIGHTS AND CATEGORIES

    Interactive Notebook 35%
    Homework and In-Class Activities 15%
    Quizzes 15%
    Final Assessments: Tests, Projects, Writing 35%

    Topics of Study: First Semester
    1st Quarter: Ancient Civilizations
    Prehistory and River Valleys

    • Analyze the characteristics of hunter-gatherer communities.
    • Explain the emergence of agriculture and its effect on early human communities.
    • Use maps, globes, and models to explain the role of the natural environment in shaping early civilizations.
    • Compare the features and contributions of civilizations in the Tigris and Euphrates, Nile, Indus, and Huang He river valleys.
    • Explain the role of economics in the development of early civilizations
    India, China, and Japan
    • Summarize the significant features of classical Indian civilization.
    • Compare major religions and philosophies as they emerged and expanded. (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism)
    • Summarize the significant features and major contributions of Chinese civilization.
    • Summarize the features and major contributions of Japanese civilization.
    2nd Quarter: Classical Civilizations
    Ancient Greece

    • Summarize the significant features of classical Greek civilization.
    • Identify and explain the roles of key people in ancient Greece including Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Archimedes, and Alexander the Great.
    Rome: Republic and Empire
    • Summarize the significant features of classical Roman civilization.
    • Identify and explain the roles of key people in ancient Greece including Julius Caesar and Augustus Caesar.
    • Compare major religions and philosophies as they emerged and expanded. (Judaism and Christianity)
    • Explain the expansion and the decline of the Roman Empire
    Topics of Study: Second Semester
    3rd Quarter: Middle Ages
    Byzantium, Arabia, and West Africa

    • Explain the contributions that the Byzantine Empire made to the world.
    • Summarize the characteristics of Islamic civilization and the geographic aspects of its expansion.
    • Compare major religions and philosophies as they emerged and expanded. (Islam)
    • Compare the features and major contributions of the African civilizations of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai.
    Medieval Europe
    • Explain feudalism and feudal relationships.
    • Explain the Magna Carta and its importance.
    • Summarize the course of the Crusades and explain their effects.
    • Explain the influence of the Roman Catholic Church in Europe.
    • Trace the origins and the spread of the bubonic plague and explain the impact of the plague on society.
    4th Quarter: Beginning the Modern World
    Renaissance and Reformation
    • Summarize the origins of the Renaissance and its spread across Europe.
    • Summarize the features and contributions of the Italian Renaissance.
    • Identify the key figures of the Renaissance and the Reformation and their contributions.
    • Explain the significance of humanism and the revival of classical learning in daily life during the Renaissance.
    • Provide examples of developments in the Renaissance that had a lasting impact on culture, politics, and government in Europe.
    • Explain the principal causes and key events of the Reformation.
    Exploration and Contact
    • Use a map to illustrate the principal routes of exploration and trade between Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas during the age of European exploration.
    • Compare the incentives of the various European countries to explore and settle new lands.
    • Illustrate the exchange of plants, animals, diseases, and technology throughout Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas (known as the Columbian Exchange), and explain the effect on the people of these regions.
    • Compare the significant features and major contributions of Aztecan, Mayan, and Incan civilizations.

    INTERACTIVE NOTEBOOK (IAN) (35%)
    This year Mrs. ___________'s class will be using a form of note-taking and processing called Interactive Notebooks. The purpose of the interactive notebook is to involve students in “making sense” of their notes visually. They will develop student nonfiction reading and note-taking skills and demonstrate “approaches to learning” that will prepare them for success in school!
    Most student work will be done in this notebook. It is organized into a left and a right side, like this:

    LEFT IS FOR LEARNING
    Teacher Guides Information
    The left side is teacher guided – it contains “testable” information
     Notes
     Handouts
     Book Assignments The right side helps you make sense of the left-side information

    RIGHT IS FOR REFLECTION
    Students Process Information

    These assignments will help you deepen your understanding of the left-side information.

    HOMEWORK and PARTICIPATION (15%)
    You will have homework most nights, Monday through Thursday. The purpose of homework is to practice, preview, or review content and skills that are taught in class. You should plan on spending about 10 - 15 minutes each night on your Humanities homework. This category also includes practice/preview in-class assignments that are not included in the IAN. These assignments are stored in the homework/in-class envelope in the back of your notebook.
    You will also receive grades for participation – attempting each task, staying on task, being prepared and working well with others. These are important skills in school and in life.

    QUIZZES (15%)
    Quizzes will be held often and their purpose is to let me know how you’re progressing with the current material. Quizzes can take many forms, including short writing assignments. The lowest quiz each quarter will be dropped.

    FINAL ASSESSMENTS (35%)
    Tests will be held when the standards for a unit of study have been met. You will be given a study guide and we will review in class. Expect 2-3 unit tests per quarter. Alternative assessments such as projects or longer writing assignments will be included in this category.

    MISSING WORK POLICIES

    Absent students
    1. Check the assignment calendar for assignments that were missed. Assignments are listed and extra copies of all handouts can be found on the assignment board.
    2. Check with Mrs. ________ if you have any questions.
    3. Complete the missed assignments/notes. You have two days for every day you are absent.
    4. Put the assignment in the late work tray with a note about your absence.

    Late or Incomplete Work (Do-overs)
    1. Incomplete work, missing work, or work that the student would like to improve may be completed or corrected without penalty within seven days of the day I grade it with the use of a “Second Chance” pass. These passes are limited and non-transferable. When they are gone, they're gone.
    2. Put the assignment in the late work tray with the pass stapled to it.

    My notebook/homework buddy: ___________________
    Phone #:__________________________________
    Email : ___________________________________

    Extra Credit Policy
    Extra credit is exactly that, extra. Extra credit is only for students who are already completing all of their work. I recommend that you put your “extra” effort toward correcting and completing your regular assignments.

    I do offer the following extra credit:
    • Notes from Parents – for communicating with you that there is a quiz or a test, and for studying for the quiz or test with an adult, I offer five points extra credit on the quiz or test. Students must bring a note with them to turn in on the day of the quiz or test.
    • The teacher may occasionally offer additional extra credit
     
  9. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Jul 31, 2007

    Chemistry
    Instructor XXX XXXXX Phone xxx-xxx-xxxx
    Office XXXx XXXXXx E-mail XXXX@xxxxx.xxx
    Office Hours M-F 3rd, 4th, and 5th Hours
    Tues 2:47-3:15 in P2A

    Text:
    Modern Chemistry; Holt, Rinehart, and Winston; 2005 Edition
    Description:
    Chemistry I is an introductory course which covers material traditionally found in a beginning chemistry course. The course is mathematical and experimental in approach. A strong emphasis is placed on practical work to verify or illustrate theoretical ideas and concepts. Through the course students should gain a knowledge and understanding of some important chemical facts and concepts, at the same time developing a responsibility and an awareness of its applications to their lives and to society. The course is designed to give students a basic foundation, which will prepare them for future chemistry courses and examinations.
    Chemistry is the study of matter. Its properties and how those properties are a result of the atomic structure. Everything in our environment, including ourselves, is composed of matter; therefore, chemistry is relevant to everyone's life. To better understand matter, which makes up our entire universe, students are encouraged to study chemistry.
    Presented as a college-preparatory course, Chemistry I is primarily offered to juniors. The course is designed to be useful to students having widely differing backgrounds and career plans. Laboratory work is a vital and essential part of this course. As much as possible, students will have a "hands-on" involvement with the material so as to actually see and experience what it is that is being learned. Formally written laboratory reports are required. These assist students in analyzing and drawing conclusions about their experiences in the laboratory. Students should expect to have an assignment every day.
    Goals:
    To promote the thinking through of problems in order to solve them.

    To develop the essential principles and concepts of chemistry in a logical sequence through experimentation and observation rather than rote recall.

    Encourage the use of technology in both classroom and lab applications.
    Requirements:
    1. Students will use the textbook as their primary reference. Websites will also be given as necessary to supplement student understanding of the subject matter. I will also periodically provide you with reference sheets that will be necessary for true understanding of the material. You are required to have access to these materials on a daily basis.
    2. Notes: You will be required to keep detailed notes of what is going on in the classroom.
    3. Homework: Homework will be checked the day after it is assigned. Homework is worth 20 points for each 9 weeks. The actual number of points received will be based on the percentage of completed homework. Since homework questions will be dealt with in class and answers will be available, NO LATE homework will be accepted. You should be prepared for daily homework.
    4. Labs: All lab work will be completed in your lab notebook. Lab notebooks must be kept in the classroom. As a preparation for college classes, a major component of this class will be laboratory work. You will be required to follow any safety guidelines in the laboratory. If you disregard the rules of the lab, you will lose participation points. If you continually break lab rules, you will not be allowed to participate in labs and this will have a significant effect on your chemistry grade. Labs will be graded on participation, contribution to your lab group, measurement, accuracy, precision, and product quality.
    5. Tests: After we finish a section (usually a textbook chapter), you will be given a test over the material. Tests are announced at least a week in advance. There will be a test review the day prior to the test. Successful performance on tests will require you to know the material that was taught in class and to be able to apply that material. Make up tests will be different than the test given and will only be administered after school. If you miss a test, you will have one week to make arrangements to take a test.
    6. Quizzes: You will have frequent 10 point quizzes on the topics covered in class. The quiz will normally be announced prior but I do reserve the right to give unannounced quizzes. You will be allowed to drop the lowest quiz of the 9 weeks. If you are absent on the day of a quiz that will automatically become the quiz that you will drop. If you miss more than one quiz, you will need to attend the quiz make up day. This will be held after school toward the end of the 9 weeks. A quiz will be administered and it will cover all the topics taught that 9 weeks.
    7. Class Participation: Class participation is an import part of success in chemistry. Class participation points can be gained by staying on task in class, classwork assignments, daily questions, and exit cards. They can also be lost by being off task, e-mailing (IMing) during class, or anything else that takes your attention off what we are trying to accomplish in class. Daily questions and exit cards will not be made up.
    8. Articles/Current Events: Every 9 weeks you will be required to turn in 2 current events articles. You will be required to write a summary and an opinion of the article according to guidelines that will be given to you.
    9. Projects: There are no large projects in chemistry due to the lab reports that will be written every 9 weeks. There are several smaller projects and most will have class time devoted to their completion.

    Science Department Make Up Policy:
    Late Assignments:
    • Any work turned in after the due date will be penalized 10% per day. After the third day, no points will be given.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to turn in late work. I will not ask for any late work.

    Unexcused Absences:
    • No work may be made up; no credit given for missed assignments.

    Excused Absences:
    • Extended absences will be dealt with on an individual basis.
    • If a student is absent due to anything other than illness, all work is due on the day they return.
    • After an absence due to illness, students will be given a number of days equal to those missed to make up the work and/or test. After that, late assignment rules will apply.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to schedule make up tests and to check Blackboard for assignments before returning to class.

    An absence is considered unexcused until a student obtains a slip from the school saying that it is excused.

    Extra Credit/Bonus Points:
    It is the policy of the science department not to give bonus points. Students are sometimes offered extra, optional assignments related to the topic of study.

    No Food or Drinks are allowed in the classroom. Water bottles will be allowed as long as they have a cap that closes.

    Tentative Course Schedule:
    Grading Period Topic
    1st Grading Period Scientific Measurements
    Experimental Design
    Scientific Problem Solving
    Atomic Development
    Atomic Structure

    2nd Grading Period Electrons in Atoms
    The Periodic Table
    Chemical Bonding
    Nomenclature
    Chemical Formulas


    3rd Grading Period Chemical Reactions
    The Mole
    Stoichiometry
    Kinetic Molecular Theory

    4th Grading Period Gases
    Solids and Liquids
    Water
    Solutions
    Acids and Bases
    Thermochemistry

    A weekly schedule will be placed on Blackboard each weekend for the week ahead. A schedule is also written in the front of the classroom. This will give you an idea of what we hope to accomplish each week in class.

    Examinations:
    Midterm Exam—A midterm exam will be given at the time authorized by the school. It will cover all 1st semester materials taught in the classroom.
    Final Exam—A final exam will be given at the time authorized by the school. It will cover all 2nd semester materials taught in the classroom. It is NOT cumulative, but remember that each concept in chemistry builds on the concept that was previously taught so an understanding of the 1st semester is necessary to pass the final exam.

    Tutoring:
    Don’t hesitate to ask for help! Chemistry is a challenging course, even for the highest achievers, but there are many support tools to help you succeed in this course. Here are a few suggestions:
    • I stay one day after school and am available to help you during my planning period. I can also stay at other times—just ask. I do not know if you want my help unless you ask for it.
    • “Buddy-up” with someone in class. Classmates are a great source of help, as they often recognize your sources of confusion.
     
  10. newtothis2006

    newtothis2006 Rookie

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    Jul 31, 2007

    What about a syllabus for Sped Math?

    I'll be teaching Resource Math to 7th/8th graders this year. I am a new teacher (taught half a year) and reading these syllabi are very helpful. However, I am just not sure how I can alter it to fit a special ed room. I know this isn't the sped forum but I didn't get any answers to my post there. I don't really know what I will be teaching because it depends on their IEP goals which change frequently. I should be teaching Math anywhere from a 3rd-7th grade level. So, what should I put for course topics/objectives? Any ideas of how I can structure it? I want to include all the policies on grading, making up work, absences, etc...
     
  11. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Jul 31, 2007

    Good Point
     
  12. Lyquidphyre

    Lyquidphyre Comrade

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    Jul 31, 2007

    I agree =o)

    I will say, with that teacher if something changed she would pass out a new, updated syllabus. But, the more I think about it the more I think it would be too much for my first year =o)
     
  13. teachmemath

    teachmemath Companion

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    Jul 31, 2007

    Thanks to all that posted their syllabus!!!! :)

    Alice do you make up one?
     
  14. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    She pulls it out of a hat :toofunny:
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 31, 2007

    No, actually, I don't.

    All our school policies are in the student handbook... the kids and parents sign a card saying they've read it (whether they have or not.)

    It just never occurred to me to do. And I end up supplementing the coursework a lot anyway, so my course is frequently more than what was in the syllabus.
     
  16. curlyone

    curlyone Rookie

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    Aug 1, 2007

    This has been a work in progress for three years now. Every year I make changes as I see what does and doesn't work well. This year I am adding current events to the required assignments.


    Welcome to the Wonderful World of Physical Science!!!

    I hope your ride through the discovery of Physical Science will be a pleasant one…Please keep your hands and feet inside the seating area at all times. Always come fully prepared and remember to adjust your thinking caps upon entering. Thank you and come again…everyday: same time-same place to be exact!

    Teacher: Mrs.
    Course: Physical Science
    Room: 12
    Email: ​

    Course Description
    This course studies basic principles of physics and chemistry with emphasis on guiding the student towards upper level sciences.

    Required Materials (Bring everyday)
    •Writing utensil. (Blue or black ink and pencil only.)
    •2” 3-ring binder
    •Dividers
    •Loose leaf paper (no spiral)
    •Scientific calculator (CALCULATORS WILL NOT BE PROVIDED)
    •1 box ​
    Kleenex
    Note: Please see Mrs. ____ if you have any problem getting these supplies.

    Guidelines for Student Behavior
    Rules in my classroom are few. I believe that all students are different, and all actions and reactions are very personal in nature. These rules involve a few overriding tenets rather than a long list of specific rules. Situations are dealt with as they arise with the focus on enabling you to grow and learn from your actions.
    1.You may engage in any behavior, which does not create a problem for you or anyone else (especially Mrs. Ellis!)
    2.If you find yourself with a problem, you may solve it by any means, which does not cause a problem for anyone else in the world.
    3.You may engage in any behavior that does not jeopardize the safety or learning of yourself or others. Unkind words and actions will NOT be tolerated.​
    Consequences
    To ensure that the above guidelines are adhered to, I will operate with the following principles as my guide.

    1.I will provide consequences that are not punitive but allow students to experience the result of a poor choice, enabling him/her to make better choices in the future.
    2.I will proceed in all situations with the best interest of the whole student in my mind—academic, social, and emotional well being will be fostered.
    3.I will guide students toward personal responsibility and the decision-making skills they will need to function in the real world.
    4.Equal is not always fair. Consequences will be designed to fit the problem of individual students, and they may be different even when problems appear to be the same.
    5.I will make every effort that, in each situation, the students involved understand why they are involved in consequences.​

    Severe Clause
    Any serious offense will be immediately referred to the Assistant Principal.​


    Grading
    My philosophy is: I don’t give grades, students EARN them.
    Your grades will come from: tests, quizzes, projects, homework, daily bell work, class activities, labs, Science Notebook, and class participation.
    You are REQUIRED to keep and calculate your own grades.
    If you have questions about your grade, please see me before or after school or at the end of the class period if time allows. ​

    Science Notebook
    Your notebook will be divided into the following categories:
    Class Info
    Bell work
    Assignments
    Dictionary
    Labs
    There is a sample notebook that will be updated weekly to help you see how your notebook needs to be organized.​

    Extra Help
    I am available before school (about 7:50am) and after school.
    You may make an appointment for help at lunch.
    Please do not wait until test time to ask for help.​

    Cheating
    Cheating will not be tolerated.
    Any student caught cheating will receive a zero for that assignment or test, receive an office referral and parents WILL be notified.​

    MHS Disciple Code
    All policies and procedures set forth in the “_____ High School Student Handbook” will be adhered to and enforced.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    Classroom Procedures
    A procedure is a particular course of action intended to achieve a result; a particular way of accomplishing an objective. Procedures are the way we do things in science. We have procedures so that our class runs smoothly and safely.

    Start of Class
    Why we have “Start of Class” procedures:
    To be able to start class quickly. This allows us more time to work on our labs and assignments.
    More class time to do work means less work that has to go home!

    1.Come into the room and sit in your assigned seat.
    2.Read the agenda on the board. The agenda is located on the chalkboard closest to the door.
    3.If an assignment is due, turn it into the appropriate basket.
    4.If you need to pick up materials or supplies, instructions will be on the front board or overhead.
    5.Begin “Bell Work”, located on the chalkboard closest to the door in the upper left corner.
    6.Be in your seat ready to begin when the bell rings.​

    End of Class
    Why we have “End of Class” procedures:
    To make sure all equipment, materials, and supplies are safely put away so that we may use them again.
    To keep our classroom clean and safe.

    1.Begin to clean up and put away your materials only AFTER you have been given instructions to do so. DO NOT get ready to leave early.
    2.Put ALL supplies, materials, and equipment back in the appropriate places.
    3.Clean up any trash; wipe down lab tables/desks if needed.
    4.Remain in your assigned seat until the bell rings and I dismiss you.​

    Handing in Assignments
    Why we have a “Handing in Assignments” procedure:
    To make sure all student work gets turned in and graded.

    1
    .All assignments are turned into the class basket unless you are given different instructions.
    2.All work is due when called for. NO LATE WORK WILL BE ACCEPTED.
    3.Check the agenda on the board to see if an assignment is due at the beginning of class.​

    Returning Graded Assignments
    Why we have a “Returning Graded Assignments” procedure:
    To ensure all student work is returned in a timely manner.
    To place all work in the Science Notebook.
    To record grade on grade sheet.
    1.After papers have been graded and entered into the grade book they are placed in an “Out” folder.
    2.Each student has a folder where all graded work will be placed.
    3.Graded work may be picked up at the beginning of class, after “today’s” work is complete, or any other APPROPRIATE time.
    4.Place all graded work in your notebook and record your grade on your grade sheet.​

    Bell Work
    Why we have “Bell Work” procedure:
    To ensure students receive credit for their bell work.

    1.“Bell Work” is located on the chalkboard closest to the door in the upper left corner.
    2.Date each entry
    3.Copy question/statement from the board. (Failure to write question/statement will result in a zero)
    4.Answer in complete sentences. Some answers may require a graph or mathematical calculations. (Failure to answer in complete sentences or show all of your work will result in a zero)
    5.You may use one sheet of paper journal per week.
    6.“Bell Work” will be due the last day of each week.​

    Make-Up Work
    Why we have “Make-Up Work” procedures:
    So that students can easily find the work they missed while absent.
    1.Make-up work is the RESPONSIBILITY of the student.
    2.In general, you have one day for each day absent to complete missing work.
    3.Your work can be found in your “OUT” folder with instructions stapled to your assignment.
    4.In the event you miss a test, you have one week from the test date to make-up during lunch. (You need to make an appointment for the day you plan to make-up, as I have occasional lunch duty.) If you fail to make-up a test within one week, you will receive a ZERO for that test grade. Once again, this is YOUR responsibility​
    .

    Lab Safety
    Why we have “Lab Safety” procedures:
    To keep all students safe and healthy.

    1.Safety procedures will vary from day to day depending on the labs and activities that day.
    2.Safety procedures will be written on each lab.
    General Safety procedures are:
    *Rules in the SAFETY CONTRACT will be followed at all times.
    *Students will behave responsibly at all times.
    *All instructions (written and verbal) will be followed.
    *Each student is responsible for helping to create a safe environment in the classroom and lab.​
    *
    Breach of the SAFETY CONTRACT will result in disciplinary actions, including, but not limited to: removal from the lab and receiving no credit for the experiment, parental /guardian contact, and/or administrative actions.
    *Student safety is a major concern in every Science class and is taken very seriously.

    Leaving the Room During Class
    Why we have “Leaving During Class” procedures:
    To prevent the disruption of learning.

    1.Each nine weeks you will receive three passes to leave the classroom for non-emergency reasons (restroom, drink, locker, library, etc).
    2.You MUST have your pass to leave the room. Don’t ask if you can go get one out of your locker, the answer will be “NO”.
    3.Bring your pass to me, with your name, date, time, and destination written in, and I will sign it for you.
    4.Do not interrupt instruction, class discussion, or student questions to ask to leave.
    5.When you return, place your pass back in your notebook.
    6.You are responsible for keeping up with your passes. I will not replace lost passes.
    7.At the end of the nine weeks, you may redeem any unused passes for ten bonus points each (30 max points).​

    *** I have the right to alter any policies and procedures as I see fit. ***

    Parents/Guardians,

    The purpose of this syllabus is to ensure understanding by both parents and students of the requirements of the course. After reading and discussing this syllabus (parents / guardian and students) please sign the statement below. Signing the statement does not obligate you to agree with the content only that you have read and understand it.

    If you have any questions or concerns of your student’s progress in my class, I may be reached by e-mail at

    Thank you,


    Mrs. _____________


    “I have read the Physical Science syllabus and understand its content and the requirements of the course.”

    ___________________________ ________________________________
    Student signature Parent/Guardian signature

    ____________ ____________
    Date Date


    Contact Information:

    Parent/Guardian Name: __________________________________

    Phone Number (Home) __________________________________

    (Work): __________________________________

    E-mail Address: ________________________________________

    Comments:
     
  17. mommee03

    mommee03 Companion

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    Aug 1, 2007

    Curlyone..I like this...I really like how you list the procedures. Are your grades 'weighted'? For example test=30% labs=30% daily work=40%. If so how do you have the students calculate their own grade?
    My syllabus that I am 'thinking' of making would only list the concepts to be covered during the six weeks, I have a seperate contract which list everything else,**thief alert** but I think I will add in these procedures **end of alert** thanks
     
  18. curlyone

    curlyone Rookie

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    Aug 1, 2007

    The grades are not weighted, so calculations are pretty easy :lol: (according to me, students hate it). After I have collected a couple of grades, I pass out blank gradesheets and as a class we start calculating the grades (I have a copy for the overhead projector). Then I keep a weekly updated list of assignments and point value. We decided as a department a couple of years ago to require the students keeping their own grades. I like it because the kids can SEE how not turning in assignments can affect their grade.

    Steal away! I "stole" alot of it from other teachers' syllabus' (?), compiling, editing, and adding to fit my needs. Like I said in an earlier post, this continues to be a work in progress!
     
  19. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Aug 2, 2007

    Here is my syllabus for my Algebra I Honors course:

    Course Syllabus MHS Mathematics Department
    Algebra I Honors 2007-2008


    Course Description :
    This course is primarily intended for those students who need to strengthen their understanding of algebraic concepts before pursuing the Geometry Honors course. It will provide students with an in-depth and rigorous approach to algebraic thinking. Problem solving will be emphasized and the graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. Topics to be studied include polynomial operations and all factoring techniques, systems of equations, inequalities and absolute values, rational and radical expressions and equations, relations and functions, and quadratic equations. Upon completion of this course, students will have a very strong foundation for advanced mathematical study.

    Chapter Topics
    NOTE: Supplementary materials will be used throughout each chapter.

    • Chapter 1 : Variables, Patterns, and Graphs
    • Chapter 2: Real Numbers
    • Chapter 3: Solving Equations
    • Chapter 4: Solving and Inequalities
    • Chapter 5: Graphs and Functions
    • Chapter 6: Linear Equations and Their Graphs
    • Chapter 7: Systems of Equations and Inequalities
    • Chapter 8: Exponents and Exponential Functions
    • Chapter 9: Polynomials and Factoring
    • Chapter 10: Quadratic Equations and Functions
    • Chapter 11: Radical Expressions and Equations
    • Chapter 12: Rational Equations and Functions



    Course Goals:

    • To instruct students in the proper uses of a graphing calculator
    • To master all material that was taught in Eight Grade Algebra (Glencoe)
    • To properly set-up and work out verbal problems.
    • To factor equations using the most effective method of factoring.
    • To prepare oneself for the very challenging and rigorous Geometry Honors course.
    • To instruct students on proper method of note-taking for a math course.
    • To understand Algebra’s practical uses in today’s world.
    • To master all topics listed above and to learn more advanced Algebra that would be normally taught in Algebra II CP.

    Student Supplies:
    Students must come prepared to class each day with the following:
    • Course Textbook: Algebra I by Prentice Hall
    • At least two sharpened PENCILS.
    • 1 inch 3-ring binder.
    • 5 dividers for binder labeled: homework, classwork, notes, tests/quizzes, and keepers.
    • 8.5” by 11” loose-leaf paper for assignments.
    • A scientific calculator that you are comfortable working with. (A graphing calculator is NOT necessary.)



    Late Work and Make-up Work:
    Students have one week to make up all missed work due to an absence, after that is a zero. This includes quizzes, tests, and assignments. Please make arrangements to see me when you are absent. Late work not due to an excused absence looses 10% per day late. Assignments turned in that same school day, but no when the assignment was collected, loose 5%.A note on plagiarism: Plagiarism will not be tolerated. In the even of plagiarism, parents and the administration will be notified. Students will be able to make up the assignment for a 30% reduction in grade. Second offenses result in an automatic zero.

    Attendance:
    Please maintain regular attendance to class, often our activities cannot be recreated for makeup work. Keep in mind that after 9 absences (in one term) from this curse you will begin to loose credit and 4 tardies total an absence .Any student not in their seat by the tardy bell will be marked absent and if they come in after that they will be marked tardy.

    Behavior and Conduct:
    I expect students to behave in a proper manner by respecting all school rules, property, teachers, and other students. Please no swearing, touching materials without permission, writing on my board with out permission, or going in my desk. Violations in school rules or disrespectful remarks towards anyone or anything will result in a detention or possible referral.! On a more positive note, I do hand out candy, prizes, stickers, and homework passes to good students!

    Grading:
    Course grades will be determined using the following categories:


    -Tests: 50%
    -Quizzes: 25%
    -Homework and Classwork: 20%
    -Binder Checks: 5%


    Each term’s grade is determined by the term exam (10%) and that term’s total average (90%), which is determined by the above categories.

    Tests are weighted as 50% of the term grade. Tests will be given every two weeks, regardless of where we are in a chapter. A study sheet will be given before each test, along with an in-class review session before hand. Tests vary in format, but are consist mostly of regular problems and word problems, multiple choice questions are limited. Tests usually contain a few bonus questions. One project will be given per term for this class and it will be worth two test grades.

    Quizzes are weighed as 20% of the term grade. You can expect 1-2 short quizzes per week. They will consist of about 5-10 questions, which can be word problems or just regular problems. Quizzes will usually have one 5 point bonus question.

    Homework and classwork is weighted 20% of the term grade, with small projects and essays also fitting into this category. Homework is either checked or collected on the day it is due. Regular assignments will be spot checked out of 10 points, while graded assignments are usually in the 20-40 point range. Classwork will sometimes be checked or graded, but is subject to the same point values. A weekly syllabus will be handed out for students to consult with regarding assignments, due dates, and other information.

    Binder checks are weighted as 5% of your tem grade. I will grade your binder at the conclusion of each term for organization, proper order and neatness using a checklist sheet. Keep all papers in the correct section and in the correct order listed on that section’s table of contents, which is posted on the back board. You are never allowed to clean out your notes or keepers section. All other papers are cleaned out at the end of each term.

    Miscellaneous Information:
    • Never put anything on my desk, ever!
    If you are not in the room and need to turn an assignment in place it in the “turn-in” box.
    • I will do my best to return all assignments, quizzes, tests, and projects within two days.
    • Respect me and I will respect you.
    • Participate in all classroom activities and your grade will be affected positively.
    • I reserve the right to add to this syllabus at any time.
    • I will go over the layout of our classroom and a basic tour during our first class meetings.
     
  20. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Aug 2, 2007

    My final syllabus (now I am all done, except for proof reading):

    Course Syllabus QMS 7th Grade: Aqua Team
    Social Studies 7: Ancient Civilizations 2007-2008

    Course Topics:
    • Prehistory
    • Ancient Mesopatamia
    • Ancient Egypt
    • Ancient Phoenicia and the Minoans (also the Myceans)
    • Ancient Israel
    • Ancient India
    • Ancient China
    • Ancient Greece
    • Ancient Rome


    Course Goals:
    Please see grade seven standards pamphlet.

    Student Supplies:
    Students must come prepared to class each day with the following:
    • COVERED textbook.
    • Pen (blue or black only!) or Pencil.
    • 1.5 inch 3-ring binder. (To be used as a modified interactive notebook)
    • 20 Sheet Protectors
    • Supply of 8.5 by 11 loose-leaf paper for binder.
    • Student Agenda
    • Optional: Crayons, Colored Pencils, Rulers, Markers, Art Paper, etc. for special projects (I only have a limited supply.)



    Late Work and Make-up Work:
    Students have two days for each day absent to make-up all work (in accordance with school handbook. This includes quizzes, tests, and assignments Please note, that being absent before a test, quiz, or assignment due date does not exclude you for taking that test or quiz on time or turning the assignment in on time. Please make arrangements to see me when you are absent. Late work not due to an excused absence looses 10% per day late. Assignments turned in that same school day, but no when the assignment was collected, loose 5%.A note on plagiarism: Plagiarism will not be tolerated. In the even of plagiarism, parents and the administration will be notified. Students will be able to make up the assignment for a 30% reduction in grade. Second offenses result in an automatic zero.


    Behavior and Conduct:
    I expect students to behave in a proper manner by respecting all school rules, property, teachers, and other students. Please no swearing, touching materials without permission, writing on my board with out permission, or going in my desk. Violations in school rules or disrespectful remarks towards anyone or anything will result in a detention or possible referral. We do a lot of fun hands on activities, projects and games in this course, if you do not behave appropriately during our fun activities, we will stop and go straight to book work, end of story! On a more positive note, I do hand out candy, prizes, stickers, and homework passes to good students!

    Grading:
    Course grades will be determined using the following categories:

    -Tests 35%
    -Homework: 15%
    -Quizzes: 15%
    -Classwork and Interactive Notebook Assignments: 25%
    -End of Unit Notebook Checks: 10%.



    Tests are weighted as 35% of the term grade, major projects and papers also fit into this category. Students can expect a test or major assignment (projects/papers) every 1-2 weeks, with about 6-8 major assignments per quarter. A day of review is also done before each test. Tests usually compose of multiple choice, matching, fill-in the blank, modified true/false, identifications, a few extra credit, and short answer questions. All test grades, including projects and papers that are graded using a rubric are worth 100 points.

    Quizzes are weighed as 15% of the term grade; you can expect approximately 1-2 quizzes within each unit, medium sized projects and essays also fit into this category. Regular quizzes will be given weekly and will consist of approximately 15-20 of the test questions listed above. Quiz grades are also out of 100 points. Quizzes can also be announced or unannounced.

    Homework is weighted as 15% of the term grade; you can expect almost nightly homework, but I don not give homework on the weekends. Your homework will usually consist of reading and taking notes, section reviews, finishing classwork, small projects/essays, working on long term assignments, or worksheets. Daily homework will be spot checked for a grade out of 10 points. Graded assignments will be worth 20-40 points.

    Classwork and Interactive Notebook assignments are weighed as 25% of the term grade. This includes any small project done in class, any worksheet done mostly in class, all notebook assignments, and all other in-class activities. Be aware that not all work done in class will be graded, but much will. Graded in-class work will be worth 20-100 points.

    Unit binder checks are weighted as 10% of your tem grade. You are expected to maintain you binder according to the posted table of contents on the board. Please keep all papers in this order and use your sheet protectors to hold each unit’s cover page. Following each unit’s cover page should be that units table of contents page listing all assignments for that unit. Binders will be graded at the end of each unit and are worth 100 points.

    Miscellaneous Information:
    • Never put anything on my desk, ever!
    • If you are not in the room and need to turn an assignment in place it in the “turn-in” box.
    • I will do my best to return daily assignments and quizzes by the next class period, smaller projects/essays within two days, tests within three days, and larger papers/projects within a week.
    • Respect me and I will respect you.
    • Participate in all classroom activities (we do a lot of act it outs and plays!) and your grade will be affected positively.
    • I reserve the right to add to this syllabus at any time.
    • I will go over the layout of our classroom and a basic tour during our first class meetings.
     
  21. kyblue07

    kyblue07 Companion

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    Aug 2, 2007

    This is my syllabus for 8th grade U.S. History. I feel like there is so much information, but something is still missing. Some of the things I changed for this year were ideas I got from here. Thanks to those of you that posted yours. The formatting is kinda funky on here, but hopefully you can read it.

    Dear Parents/Guardians,


    Welcome to a new year at ________________School! I am looking forward to a great year of learning with your child. The eighth grade year is a special time in life and I am proud to be a part of this year’s staff.
    Although most of the students are already familiar with me, I thought I’d take this opportunity to introduce myself and share my background. This will be my third year at _____. As a graduate of ____HS, I take great pride in teaching in the same district I attended. I’ve traveled and lived all over the United States with a Navy husband. While I enjoyed my experiences, it is nice to be home. I graduated from ________________________________ with certifications in English and Social Studies.
    In eighth grade Social Studies, we will be learning about U.S. History up to the Reconstruction period. However, we will be looking at history through the various lenses of the social sciences such as geography, economics, culture, & government/civics. This year we will utilize new textbooks from Holt and the History Alive series, The United States through Industrialism. Since we do not have enough books for every student, you should not expect your child to bring his or her history book home often. There will be very few homework assignments with most work completed in students’ notebooks during class.
    Students will once again be given school planners to use this year. I ask that you check your child’s planner book every evening. I will use this as a way to communicate messages and provide grade checks which will require your signature. It is equally important that you check or ask your student for any papers that have been sent home for parents. Often, information is sent home, but students neglect to give papers to parents.
    The following pages provide specific information about this class. While I know the start of school brings an abundance of paperwork for parents, please review and keep this information with the exception of the signature & information page. I ask that you complete this page and return it to school.
    Please feel free to contact me with any questions. Email is the best and quickest way to reach me, but you can also call the school during my planning times, schedule a conference, or use the planner book to write a note to me.

    I ask that each student have the following supplies no later than Wed, Aug 15.
    • Single subject Notebook (Please do not use the no-wire type unless it is a black and white composition notebook)
    • Pencils or pens (Please no neon colored pens)
    • Colored Pencils

    Thanks for all that you do as parents and I look forward to a great year!

    Mrs. ______



    EIGHTH GRADE SOCIAL STUDIES SYLLABUS
    The primary purpose of social studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world.
    National Council for the Social Studies
    Teacher: ________
    Email: ____________________ (best method)
    Phone: ________, Planning Times: 9:25-9:55 & 2:05-2:50 (3rd and 8th periods)
    Textbook and Instructional Program: United States History: Beginnings to 1877 (2007, Holt), History Alive! The United States Through Industrialism (TCI, www.teachtci.com)

    Kentucky Core Content: Kentucky’s Core Content forms the foundation of this class. The Core Content is available at the following web address (NOTE: Eighth grade represents a CATS ASSESMENT year in Social Studies):
    http://www.education.ky.gov/KDE/Ins...Teaching+Tools/Combined+Curriculum+Documents/

    Course Outline:
    Unit 1: Geography
    Unit 2: Native Peoples & Exploration
    Unit 3: Colonization
    Unit 4: Toward Independence & American Revolution
    Unit 5: Constitution, U.S. Government, and Civics
    Unit 6: Early Government
    Unit 7: Expansion & Reform
    Unit 8: Conflict and the Civil War

    Grading: Tests, Projects, Essays: 40%
    Quizzes: 30%
    Daily Work & Participation, Notebooks: 20%
    Homework: 10%
    Extra credit options will be available for each unit and will be posted in class room.

    Behavior Expectations & Discipline: Behavior must follow the WMS P.R.I.D.E. expectations chart.
    The following are expectations for Social Studies class:
    • Be respectful to people & property. Treat others the way you want to be treated.
    • Be prepared with materials and a positive attitude.
    • Be focused. Listen, think, question, participate, and learn!
    • Follow the WMS P.R.I.D.E. Expectations Chart and the classroom procedures.
    Consequences and formal discipline procedures as outlined in the P.R.I.D.E. model (strike system and honor system) will be utilized and followed. These include but are not limited to warnings, reminders, proximity, seating change or removal from group setting, student/teacher conferences, modifications, contacting home, parent conferences, strikes, lunch detention, office referral, removal from classroom.

    What to expect from Social Studies class this year:
    • Practice & improvement of note-taking and organizational skills
    • Engaging PowerPoint presentations
    • Simulations & Role-playing
    • Cooperative learning & projects
    • Learning in multiple styles & ways

    INTERACTIVE STUDENT NOTEBOOKS

    This year in Social Studies 8, your student will keep an INTERACTIVE STUDENT NOTEBOOK (ISNs). Notebook scores will make up 20% of the grade. On this page, you will find specific information regarding the NOTEBOOKS. In addition, you will find several web-pages listed below for further reading and explanation.
    It is my hope that utilizing the ISN will further your student’s learning and interest while helping him or her with note-taking and organization of material.


    Homepage for TCI, the company that created the concept of ISN (Best source for information and provides an example page from an ISN): http://www.teachtci.com/forum/isn.aspx

    ISN Tutorial (This was made by another teacher but it explains the basics):
    http://www.campbellusd.org/~rhms/ahamilton/tutorial/rationale.htm


    Guidelines for Interactive Student Notebooks
    Notebooks will have a “left side, right side” orientation to help students record, organize, and process new information. Most assignments will be done in the notebook and completed in class. Notebooks will be organized in this way:
    Left Side
    Students Process New Ideas
    • Reorganize new info in creative formats
    • Express opinions and feelings
    • Explore new ideas
    Right Side
    Teacher Provides New Information
    • Class notes
    • Discussion notes
    • Reading notes
    • Handouts with new info
    Responsibility: Notebooks must be kept in good condition and left in the classroom each day. It is the student’s responsibility to complete any missed notes & assignments.

    Grading: Notebook checks will take place every Friday and/or on quiz days. Notebooks will be graded with the attached grading chart. Notebooks will be sent home for parent review periodically.

    GRADING CHART FOR INTERACTIVE STUDENT NOTEBOOKS
    Criteria:
    • • All class notes and right-side work are completed as directed and of high
    quality, even for days when you are absent
    • All left-side work is completed as directed and of high quality
    • Left – and right- side work is organized and neat
    • Effective highlighting and use of color
    Weekly Notebook Grading Chart:

    0 2 4 6 8 10
    Needs Improvement Fair Good Excellent Total: ___/ 10

    2007-2008 PROCEDURES FOR SOCIAL STUDIES CLASS
    First 5 minutes of class: Warm-up Time: Get notebook, supplies ready, make daily entry into notebook & begin newspaper time. Everyday I will ask 1 or 2 students to share something they read. This will be part of your daily score. This is the time to get any absent work you need from the absent board. It is not the time for questions or talking.

    Last 3 minutes of class: Wrap-up Time: Return notebooks, supplies, clean up group area & classroom. You can also seek help for completing absent work. Once your materials are returned and area is clean, you should wait quietly in your seat for dismissal.

    Time in between Warm-up and Wrap-up time is Instructional Time. This is the time for questions about the lesson, assignment, or activity. Do not get out of your seat during presentations, lectures, whole-class discussions, or note-taking.

    Tardies: You must be in the classroom by the last ring of the tardy bell. Immediately start warm-up time activities.

    Questions: ALWAYS raise your hand to ask a question or make a comment. Questions or comments about other topics (not lesson material) need to be addressed during Wrap-up Time. Questions about the lesson can be addressed any time except during warm-up time when we are reading. If you have an emergency, you can raise your hand at any time and let me know.

    Turning in Work: Most work will be completed in your notebooks. If you are asked to turn in work, place it in your class tray. You will rarely have homework in this class with the exception of reviewing and studying notes & quizzes.

    Absent Work: Work missed due to an excused absence must be completed and is due no later than same number of days absent plus one extra day.
    • Visit the absent board after completing the daily entry during warm up time. Use your notebook to write down assignments you missed. These will be listed on the weekly agenda sheet.
    • Check the weekly envelopes for any handouts that have your name on them.
    • Initial next to your name on the absent work calendar so I know who got their work.
    • If you need help use wrap-up time to ask one of your group members, check the class notebook, or see me.
    • If you missed a notebook check, place your notebook in the absent work tray during wrap-up time so that I can check it.
    • See me to make up a test.

    Attention & Announcements: When you see my hand in the air & hear ‘time out’ that is your signal to freeze. No matter what you are doing or saying, stop and listen. Anytime there is an announcement, you should freeze, stop & listen.

    Alarms & Drills: Line up single file at the door without talking. This is not the time for goofing off. Follow as instructed.

    Restroom & Lockers: Use the rr between classes. Unless you have an emergency, do not ask to use the restroom, especially during instructional time & warm-ups. If you are permitted to use the rr, you must have an agenda book.

    Dismissal: Wait until I give you permission to leave regardless of the bell. The room must be in order before a class will be dismissed. No one will be permitted to visit their locker during class. Please use the designated locker times.

    Electronics & Personal Items: If I see or hear it, I will take it, and you can pick it up at office at the end of day. This is a school-wide policy. This includes cell phones, i-pods, psp, gaming systems, headphones and personal players. Do not bring items, toys, games, etc to class. Either leave them in your locker or do not bring them to school.

    Seating: Sit in your assigned seat. No exceptions. Please see me after class if you have a problem with your assigned seat.

    Addressing me & appropriate language: Address me as Mrs. ______. Please use appropriate language and speaking in the classroom. Do not use slang, name-calling, profanity or derogatory comments.

    Headings: Use first & last name, date, and title of assignment on every paper. I will assign the title of each assignment.

    Notebooks: Notebooks do not leave the classroom unless otherwise instructed. Group members will take turns getting and returning their set of notebooks each day. Instructions for maintaining and using the notebooks will be posted and kept inside the front cover.

    Problems: Follow through with expectations, procedures, & requests when they are given. If you have a problem, disagreement, or concern please wait for an appropriate time to discuss this with me (during wrap-up time or after class) or fill out a Listening Ear Slip. Do not create an argument or disturbance during class.

    SIGNATURE & INFORMATION PAGE

    PLEASE COMPLETE AND RETURN THIS PAGE ONLY AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

     Student’s Name (please print): __________________________________________________

     Parent/Guardian Name (please print): ____________________________________________

     Please circle the method of contact you prefer:

    phone email notes in planner letter through mail other: ____________

     Contact Information:

    Home Phone: _________________________________________

    Cell Phone (if applicable): _______________________________

    Address: ______________________________________________

    ______________________________________________

    ______________________________________________

    Email: ________________________________________________

    Do you have access to the internet at home? ________________

    Would a class webpage be helpful to you? _________________________________________

    I have read and understand the information in this packet regarding my child’s Social Studies 8th grade class.


    Parent Signature Date



    I have read and understand the information in this packet regarding my Social Studies 8th grade class. Mrs. _______ has also discussed and explained this information to me in class.


    Student Signature Date

    Thank you for taking the time to read & complete these documents. As a parent, I understand the time it takes up to do this. Thanks for all that you do as parents!!!!!
     
  22. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 2, 2007

    Brendan, did you type that as you meant to? How can you teach them the graphing calculator if they don't have one with them? Do you have a classroom set?

    Our kids do NOT use a calculator of any sort until they hit Trigonometry in Sophomore year. Until then the numbers are manageable.
     
  23. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Aug 2, 2007

    We have a class set of graphing calculators.
     
  24. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 2, 2007

    OK... that makes sense :)
     

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