counting up change

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by HufflePuff, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. HufflePuff

    HufflePuff Cohort

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    Sep 19, 2010

    My 3rd graders are struggling and I admit, I am struggling teaching it!

    Is there a simple way to explain this to them? Money has always been my weakest point, too, so it's difficult for me to explain it.
     
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  3. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Sep 19, 2010

    Would you consider skipping it for now? When I student taught in 3rd I remember teaching it in January, and my current team holds off on that until about then, too. EnVisions has counting change in the first unit but I personally don't think they're ready.
     
  4. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Sep 19, 2010

    I know I"m a 2nd grade teacher but my closest friends are in 3rd. They don't even touch money until Jan. or even later. Right now, it's review of basic addition/subtraction and patterns.
     
  5. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

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    Sep 19, 2010

    Touch money! I taught it last year using the touch points, and it went soooooo much better. Money is a tough concept. If you can teach them the touch points, and they can count by 5s, you are all set!
     
  6. cheerfulfifi

    cheerfulfifi Rookie

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    Sep 19, 2010

    We count up to make change in second grade. I use a graphic organizer to teach them the pattern of counting up pennies, dimes, and then dollars.
    If you work on a slate or chalkboard tell them to put how much money the item was at the top. Then near the bottom put how much money they have the cashier.
    The first step is to count from the amount the item was to the nearest number that starts with 0. (this is counting by pennies) The second step is to count to the nearest whole dollar amount. (this is counting by dimes) The final step is to count up to the amount of money you paid the cashier. If you print this into a graphic organizer, it's easy for the kids to follow the steps. It takes A LOT of practice - and don't get too frustrated because it's a really tough concept.

    Overall it would look like this:
    I spent $4.67
    +$0.03
    Nearest number that ends in 0 $4.70
    +$0.30
    Nearest whole dollar $5.00
    +$5.00
    Amount Paid $10.00

    Add the three amounts underlined together to get change.
    $0.03 + $0.30 + $5.00 = $5.33
     
  7. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Sep 19, 2010

    What does the graphic organizer look like?
     
  8. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    I'm curious too because counting back change...oh lord, a challenge every year I've taught.
     
  9. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Sep 19, 2010

    In second grade we:

    put a handful of play coins in a sock. Reach into the sock, pull out a few coins. Sort the coins. Start counting largest coins first.

    Fun game, the kids enjoy it. The hardest part is getting them to sort out the coins, and not start counting pennies first!
     
  10. Toast

    Toast Companion

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    Sep 19, 2010

    there is a game on super teacher worksheets dot com that has a "count coins up to a dollar" game that uses dice and coins. It's great practice for counting change up to a dollar.

    I had the counting up change lesson with my 3rd graders 2 weeks ago and I ended up just teaching counting change by method of subtraction.
     
  11. cheerfulfifi

    cheerfulfifi Rookie

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    Sep 19, 2010

    The graphic organizer looks just like what I typed above, but I use only half a piece of paper so they can have more room to practice. On the left side I put the steps and then blanks on the right side so they can add up the totals.

    You'll have to basically create your own graphic organizer... it's not one that LFS created. However if you think of making one that helps them to follow the same set of steps, that will help.
     
  12. teachinVA

    teachinVA Rookie

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    Sep 20, 2010

    Touch all the way! I love it and my kids really got it. Just teach the kids thats for every 5 in a coin they put an x so a nickel gets 1, dime gets 2, quarter gets 5 x's and half dollars get 10. Then they just count by 5's to add it up.
     

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