Counting Money

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Buckeye, Oct 5, 2007.

  1. Buckeye

    Buckeye Rookie

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    Oct 5, 2007

    I am looking for creative ways to teach my third graders how to count money using bills and coins. Half of my class just isn't getting it. They learned this skill in second grade but they have either forgotten it or it was never fully developed. They biggest struggle they are having is going from a quarter and then adding dimes. They want to say 30 rather than 35.

    Any ideas would be very helpful.

    Thanks
     
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  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Oct 6, 2007

    Practice skip counting by 10's.. but start with 5...

    example: 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, etc.
     
  4. corps2005

    corps2005 Cohort

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    Oct 6, 2007

    I also struggle with this in second grade. We practice skip counting on a daily basis. Some students are finally grasping skipping with pennies, nickels, and dimes, but have difficulty when it comes to quarters. So far, I have only one student who can skip count with any coin.

    For the really low ones, they draw dots below each coin. Each dot stands for a "5," so a quarter would have 5 of them. Then, they count the dots by five and add the pennies last.
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Oct 6, 2007

    Keep a hundreds chart displayed and discuss skip counting patterns every morning. Skip count together. Do you do calendar in the morning? We do and it gives us the opportunity to do a daily review of tons of subject area.
     
  6. lcluigs03

    lcluigs03 Cohort

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    Oct 6, 2007

    i do this too! keeping a 100 chart at view or even giving them one to keep on their desk has been a god's send! my two low guys are doing so much better with it since i've done this (they are on a 1st grade level with everything). so if they can...i'm sure yours can too!

    the skip counting thing...start with odd numbers like the above poster said 5, 15, 25, 35...etc. i try to show them that only the 10s spot changes. but even counting by 5s is hard for my two.

    good luck!
    LC
     
  7. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Oct 6, 2007

    Set up a store. It can be a paper store (ie, pictures of things they like). It can be a classroom fictional store (supplies in the classroom they have to return). It can be a prize store (real stuff they can take home). If you do the latter, you might do it weekly and at the end of the year do an auction.

    You might even get a cheap toy catalog and have them calculate 3 things they would like. Of course we could just be making these kids greedy.
     
  8. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Oct 6, 2007

    In our school we do a coin drive every year and it goes to charity (a specific program.) Unifcef does change collection during Halloween. Perhaps you can tie in some community service to your project. Our students are always very motivated to work with money, when it's real money and when they know it's going toward something important.

    We count it out in several ways. We count by specifc coins, how many dimes do we have? Each child gets a pile to count, we work on ways to make a dollar, etc. You can do countless things with it, and it's helpful because it's real money and real coins are actually easier to manipulate then the plastic, mostly I think because of the weight, and they can stack more easily.
     

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