Correct English usage.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by letsteach, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

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    Jun 16, 2010

    It is report time and we all have to proofread each other's reports.
    Can you please help me with the correct English for the following sentence.
    "When children do not do the right thing, they are given ‘time out’ and the teacher talks to the child on their level"

    I teach 5 year olds (mostly ESL) and during free activities they do their time out which is one minute for every year of age. While they have time out, I get down to their level and change my language so they will understand the message I want to communicate.

    Should it be: on their level

    or

    at their level?

    Thanks.
     
  2.  
  3. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Jun 16, 2010

    It should be "on their level."

    And I would says "speaks with the children," not "talks to the child." Otherwise, you are saying children and then child.
     
  4. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Jun 16, 2010

    "... on his/her level."
    The other "their" needs corrected, too.

    Or, do what Missy wrote and change "child" to "children."

    Child = his/her
    Children = their
     
  5. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    Jun 16, 2010

    I would move to keep it all singular instead of mixing singular and plural. I would also seek to be more specific. Not doing the right thing could be 2 + 2 = 3, but Johnny smacking Sally is a bit more.

    For example,

    "When a child does not behave appropriately, they are given a ‘time out’ and the teacher talks to the child about the behavior on the child's level."

    From there, I would go into specifics of what is meant by "talks to the child about the behavior on the child's level."


    Crisp communication is all about the details and avoiding assumptions that the other person knows what you mean while not doing so in a way that is taken as talking down or belittling.
     
  6. flowerpower31

    flowerpower31 Comrade

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    Jun 16, 2010

    :yeahthat:
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jun 16, 2010

    You can't say, 'a child' along with 'their level'. The first is singular, the next is plural.

    I suggest:

    When a child breaks a classroom rule, the teacher talks with the child about his or her behavior, and the child serves the appropriate time out (one minute per year of child's age).
     
  8. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

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    Jun 17, 2010

    Thank you, I knew you could help me.

    We have had more directives not to make the reports too wordy and full of 'teacher lingo or jargon'. I had to smile to myself when the new Principal said this because I am guilty of both being wordy and using jargon. My son leaned over my shoulder as I was writing a report, and asked me, "What does 'appropriate atttention seeking strategies' mean?". I told him, this child is meant to put up their hand instead of calling out, "Well, why don't you just say 'put up your hand'?"!!!
     

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