Consolidation - What happens to teachers?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ku_alum, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Apr 21, 2014

    What do you know about school consolidation? My biggest question is what happens to teachers? Do they keep their jobs?
     
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  3. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Apr 21, 2014

    It's tough. Most of the consolidations happening in my area-and there are a lot-are activities only. Actual schools would be the last resort. Absolute last. People would kick an scream before that happened. I will say, activities consolidations are hard enough-the worst decisions involve the mascot, colors, an how many home games each site will receive.

    But I digress...that isn't answering your question. The ones I know, schools found a way to make it work. Either all teachers received a job (not necessarily "their" job), got a different position (curriculum, assessment, etc), or left all together (by choice). Like any school, the ones in jeopardy would be nontenured.
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Apr 21, 2014

    In my experience, a few brand new specialized positions appear for some teachers and administrators. It seems there wouldn't be enough positions to save everyone, though. Maybe a couple able to retire do, a few who were planning to leave anyway do, and things like that make it mostly all work out. But take cafeteria workers, for example. Seems some would for sure be cut.
     
  5. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Apr 21, 2014

    When it happened in a local district it was all about who had the right credentials and seniority, seniority, seniority. A lot of people were bumped around. Some jobs were lost.
     
  6. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Apr 22, 2014

    If the total enrollment is staying the same in the district, and the contracts aren't changing significantly, I would think most districts would keep the same number of teachers (if they choose), but obviously, they would be moved around to the new schools of need or used to be placed in some retiring/quitting/moving positions. This is happening to our district, and all the teachers I believe have received an initial idea of which school they will be at next year. For some, it was a move to a position they wanted even more than where they were at now...so it isn't always completely bad for all involved (though naturally, it won't be fully great, either!)
     
  7. Honest_Teacher

    Honest_Teacher Comrade

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    Apr 22, 2014

    Consolidation is generally done to save money; staff salaries and benefits are by far the highest cost to districts, so it makes sense that some redundant position would be eliminated, just like in the private sector.
     
  8. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Apr 23, 2014

    Is consolidation a euphemism for layoffs?
     
  9. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Apr 23, 2014

    No, Rox, consolidation is when multiple school districts (often smaller, rural ones, or neighboring ones) consolidate into one district.
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Apr 23, 2014

    My first school joined with a middle school my second year to become a K-8. The year before the consolidation, my P and AP were acting as admins as both buildings. They would switch off who was at which school by days. The P of the middle school had retired and the AP was put into another open position in the district. When we actually consolidated, the specials teachers were the ones to lose jobs. When they were separate, both schools were allotted .7 or .8 positions for art, music, and PE. When consolidated, this turned into one full time position, so three people lost jobs. They also replaced the library and technology/computer positions with paras. The librarian that we had at the elementary became a title 1 teacher- I'm not sure what happened to the one at the middle school. SPED and ELL were not cut from either building because there were just as many kids needing the services when the school combined, and obviously the same would go for grade level teachers. From what I understand, the biggest money saver to the district was cutting the cost of running two buildings (heating, electricity, etc.) into just one.
     

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