Considering becoming a teacher - starting salary?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by logix, Oct 13, 2015.

  1. logix

    logix Guest

    Oct 13, 2015

    Hello all,

    I've given some consideration to becoming a teacher and had a question on whether my current salary would have any influence on the starting pay I'd have as a teacher in a public school. I can't seem to find any on-point answers for this via Google so I'm posting here, if it's already been asked/answered or it's in a FAQ somewhere here I'd definitely appreciate a link in the right direction.

    As an example I make $60k a year right now, and the starting salary for a local high school teacher is $35k but can max out at $70k+ down the line.​

    Would I have to start at the $35k rate and work my way up from scratch? Or would my current pay be considered and I could start at or around the $60k I make in my current job, and then progress normally on the teacher pay scale?​

    I'm not considering the switch to get rich obviously, my current job has a similar pay ceiling, but "starting over" and taking a significant pay cut would definitely steer me away from teaching. But if all things were equal it's something i'd be interested in pursuing more seriously than a quick post on a forum. Some additional info in case it's relevant:

    1. I'd want to teach high school.
    2. I have Bachelor's degrees in Computer Science & Physics.
    3. I'm not certified to teach but willing to do that.
    4. 4+ years experience in my current job.
     
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  3. DigitalDiva25

    DigitalDiva25 Companion

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    Oct 13, 2015

    I started with a $38k salary.....4 years later, I'm earning $41k. So it will take me probably about 20 years or more working as a teacher to earn $60k if I decide to stay. But I don't know if they will consider giving you a starting pay of $60k though, never hurts to ask :)
     
  4. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Oct 13, 2015

    I don't know about private schools, but around here public and charters pay based on teaching experience. So if you have no teaching experience, yes, you start at the bottom.

    Even when I lived in a much higher COL area (small houses $700k and up, my one bedroom apartment was $1600 a month), it still would have taken me a lot more than 4 years to make $60k.

    Teaching is not really a lucrative job in most areas of the country, especially at the beginning.
     
  5. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Oct 13, 2015

    You'd have to start at the bottom.
     
  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Oct 13, 2015

    What you make now won't influence what you get paid to begin. The only way to get yourself to start with higher than the $35K is with teaching experience or some type of advanced degree such as a master's degree.
     
  7. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

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    Oct 14, 2015

    Very rarely will you ever find a school district that will pay you for non-teaching experience, unless it's in the military. You will start at the bottom, unless you have an advanced degree. It took me 5 years plus an advanced degree to reach 60k+.

    Most school districts post their salary scales on their websites. Check out some of the big districts near you to get an idea. Id say most districts around the same area pay about the same. If you're close to or in a big city, the salary is generally much higher.

    Also, as a teacher we have more deductions from our pay than in the private sector, so 60K as a teacher is not the same as 60k in the private sector. We have union dues, pension, and health insurance that comes out. Around here healthcare costs are super higher for public employees.
     
  8. cupcakequeen

    cupcakequeen Comrade

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    Oct 14, 2015

    I can't say that it's like this everywhere, but in my state school districts offer a local supplement in addition to the state salary scale. In some areas it's not much, a few hundred bucks, but in bigger districts and after several years of experience it can be as much as $5,000.

    I work in a smaller but moderately wealthy district and get a supplement of $1900 with 2 years exp.
     
  9. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Oct 14, 2015

    What you made in your past life will have no impact on your salary as a teacher.
     
  10. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Oct 14, 2015

    It's going to be different depending on what area of the country you're in and what type of school district you are in. Something I think that will be consistent is that you will start at the bottom no matter what district/area you are in because it is based on teaching experience. I'm in a small suburb of Ft Worth with 5 years teaching experience and working on my 3rd year in a somewhat administrative role and I do not make $60K. Some districts do pay a supplement for math, science, bilingual teachers though not all.
     
  11. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Oct 14, 2015

    Each district is a bit different, but generally, you move one step up the pay scale for each year of teaching experience.

    I started at nearly 40k. I think that's right about in the middle. Some districts start at under 30k still, and some are nearly at 50k. Google the name of any school district you're interest in and "pay scale" and you should be able to see what those districts pay. It's usually easily accessible information.
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 14, 2015

    I'll echo what others have said: new teachers pretty much start at the bottom regardless of previous work experience.
     
  13. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Oct 14, 2015

    In the districts around here, you would have to teach 20+ years to make $60,000. Depending on your students test scores, you will not even get regular raises unless the kids score high enough on the state tests.

    Like everyone else has said, you will begin at the bottom.
     
  14. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Oct 14, 2015

    Ugh, I just can't believe teacher pay is really being tied to test scores! How horrible! I feel so, so lucky to be in a place where test scores are not emphasized as the be-all, end all.

    That being said, our school kicked derrière on the CASP/SBAC/CACA (whatever it's called!), despite being a Title 1 school with 30% ELL and at least 50% redesignated English proficient. So we are proof that a school can improve its test scores without treating teachers like factory workers with quotas. :D
     
  15. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Oct 14, 2015

    It depends upon the state, district, what you plan on teaching and your education. I was given several years of experience when I started teaching because my work experience directly related to my certification. I teach high school. My experience would not translate to anything in an elementary school classroom.
     

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