Consequences

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by Anne Marie, Mar 10, 2006.

  1. Anne Marie

    Anne Marie Rookie

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    Mar 10, 2006

    I need help concerning a very impulsive student. I am running out of ideas on forms of punishment. He gets in trouble constantly for talking, getting out of his seat, etc. I was thinking of making him copy a report on consequences (or something to that nature). Anyone have any suggestions?
     
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  3. ctopher

    ctopher Comrade

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    Mar 10, 2006

    Well in my opinion consequences and punishments are very different. A consequence is something that happens naturally because they did X behavior and is designed to help the student think about what they did and guides them to an alternative. A punishment is something used to belittle and overpower students.

    Consequences I've used...

    Students who can't stay in their seat don't get one. I have tables with chairs and so any student that chooses to tip over their chair or can't stay sitting at the appropriate time loses their chair for a short period.

    If the student is getting up and walking around while I'm teaching I stop and wait. My students know that if we don't accomplish what needs to be done before recces then we work through recess or as long as it takes to get it done. Other students will quickly start catching on and helping monitor the student once they've missed a reccess or 2. Same thing with talking I don't teach until it's quiet. During work time if it gets loud they all put their pencils down until the noise level is acceptable again.

    Another thing you can do is just have the student leave the room and sit in the back of another classroom until they are ready to be a part of the class again. This is a system that my school has implemented with much success.

    Wow, typing that makes me sound like a task master! But I have to say I'm always getting told how respectful, quiet, and hard working my students are. We also have a lot of fun together.
     
  4. Anne Marie

    Anne Marie Rookie

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    Mar 10, 2006

    Thanks!
     
  5. kburen

    kburen Cohort

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    Mar 10, 2006

    I think it depends on the child and your class. I have tried everything that ctopher says and it doesn't work with my students. If I stopped all day and waited for them *like I have tried* I don't get in what needs to get in at all. That includes during our 15 minute recess time. Then I have BIG problems. They don't know the material for the tests and they won't pass their SOL tests at the end of the year (which could affect my having a job next year). Taking chairs away from my students makes them laugh and do it all the more. Having them leave the room, again, they miss the material and can't pass the tests...Grades and SOLs again affecting my job situation next year.
     
  6. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Mar 10, 2006

    Unless you joined the forum an hour ago, you know that I am a big believer in letting natural consequences of actions fall right smack on the heads of the students. If a student disobeys you in any way, make sure something unpleasant happens immediately. And if a kid has chosen to be disruptive, isn't that grossly unfair to all the others in the room? It could even affect THEIR test scores, if they have to put up with the idiocy of one out-of-control kid. Let him know in no uncertain terms that his antics are not to reoccur, and if he tests you, make sure you follow through. He gets up? Open the door and motion him OUT. You don't have to put up with that kind of moronic activity, and your other kids certainly shouldn't have to. Call the office and tell them to expect the little brat. Just get him out. Your other kids deserve an environment wherein they can learn, and this kid needs to learn that he is not in charge of your classroom. Right now, it sounds kinda like he is.

    Write up a contract, and make him sign it. Then make a copy, send it home, and make his parents sign it. Make copies for the principal, and for the secretary, and be sure that contract clearly states that any stupid antics are NOT to be tolerated, and that the child will be removed from the classroom if he CHOOSES to continue to be disruptive.

    And frankly, I don't really care why he does it. He does it, and it's not fair to the other kids.

    All the letters of the alphabet will not convince me otherwise.
     
  7. ctopher

    ctopher Comrade

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    Mar 10, 2006

    Well said!! If the kid is in your room goofing around you're not getting your stuff done that you need to anyway and if the kid is out of the room at least all the other students in your room are learning. Sometimes you have to sacrifice 1 for the good of the whole. You have to make the student accountable otherwise they continue to be the ones in control.
     
  8. Pecas

    Pecas Companion

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    Mar 10, 2006

    In the past, I have used a checkbook system for my students for rewards/consequences. Each child is issued a check book and is given $100 every Monday or Payday. (if the week is short, shorten it by $10 per day.)
    I then post a list of "fines" for my students. If they are talking, being disrespectful or anything else, they need to write me a check for the designated amount. Talking, or being disruptive would be $5, more serious consequences would be more. Every time the student is talking tell them that you want a check for $5. They have to write the check right at that moment and turn it in to the "bank" (I keep track of everyone's balances on the computer) If he has to write out a check five times in one day, he wont be happy, but in my experience, he will realize how often he interrupts and slowly start to care about not wasting his money. This worked MIRACLES on one of my students with EBD...he hated it for the first few weeks but after a while he loved seeing the money start to accumulate in his account instead of disappear. We were all MUCH happier.
     
  9. Pecas

    Pecas Companion

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    Mar 10, 2006

    Oh, you can also give money as rewards to the students when they are caught being good, too. A little more incentive!
     
  10. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Mar 10, 2006

    I know I didn't learn to use checkbooks until 5th grade, but a 3rd grade classroom I was in used a money system. Kids got/paid fake money in a system similar to pecas. I think that's a little less abstract to a 3rd grader.

    Another 3rd grade class I was in only one student was on a ticket system. In the morning he got 5 tickets. Each time he was disruptive he lost one or more depending on the situation. When he got 15 tickets he could earn a single piece of licorice (it usually took a few weeks) or he could work on other prizes out of a prize drawer. Some of the other kids complained but not too often because he rarely earned treats. Also they can't buy the treats in the morning because then they won't have enough tickets to give up through out the day.
     
  11. panda

    panda Guest

    Mar 10, 2006

    I used a money system and I think it was good give money at random for good behavior as well using it for negative behavior. My only problem was that some students got so far behind the others that it wasn't a motivation for them anymore:(
     
  12. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Mar 11, 2006

    That's exactly why many teachers use a variety of motivators. Most classrooms I go in have the kids seated in groups and they get group points for good behavior, class points and individual motivators. Some kids aren't motivated by one method but will work for others.
     
  13. ilove2ndgrade

    ilove2ndgrade Rookie

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    Mar 12, 2006

    We give out tickets for positive behavior. (Kind of like a money system.) I can pass the tickets out at any minute and they know it! So I might give one to a few kids who are standing in line quietly even though someone nearby is talking... or a few might get a ticket for being really involved in a discussion... or for picking something up and throwing it away... anything! (As long as it shows respect for self, others, learning or environment... our 4 school rules.) It keeps kids on track most of the time and snaps the rest in place when they see a ticket given away. The students use these tickets to buy privileges, school supplies, and treats. They love it! (We do not take tickets away for misbehavior.)

    Most of our students will respond to the things we have all suggested... all good ideas! However, there are those students (maybe even like the one Anne Marie is describing) who just can't be reached in this way. For these students, you must find the motive or reason for the behavior and address it.

    This year my school has adopted a program that focuses on teaching positive social behaviors and adopting more of a problem-solving approach for addressing behavior concerns. It's been challenging... but it really seems to be making a difference!

    Here's a website if anyone wants to read more about it... www.pbis.org.
     

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