Consequences for not turning in lesson plans

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by pabef, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. pabef

    pabef Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2007
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 20, 2009

    I require my teachers to turn in lesson plans each Friday for the next week. However, I have two who have become lax (sp?) about this. They say that they plan to work on them over the weekend and bring them on Monday, but if Monday rolls around and they call in sick, I have nothing for a sub accept what is in the sub folder, which is not much. What consequences do you have for not turning in lesson plans on time?
     
  2.  
  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 20, 2009

    I don't have to turn in plans. After 17 years in the buillding, they know that I'm doing as I should be. If I have to call in, they know that either I'll find something appropriate or I'll ask one of my friends to.

    But that's not the point. If my boss required them, they would be in and on time. The employees don't get to set the deadlines-- that's the boss's job.

    I would imagine you should start with a letter, with a copy being put into their professional file. And it should progress from there.
     
  4. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,661
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 20, 2009

    Yes, I would assume that you would move on to written warnings and such. These days, public school or not, having paperwork trails to show how you are helping the children grow is soooo important.

    If they aren't doing lesson plans--what else aren't they doing?
     
  5. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Messages:
    3,544
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 20, 2009

    Fridays are a tough day to get paperwork in. By the end of the week, you're exhausted and don't even want to think about next week. Perhaps you could change it to a Wednesday turn-in? Or ask them to have them e-mailed to you by Sunday at noon?
     
  6. peggy27

    peggy27 Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    552
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 20, 2009

    I don't have to turn plans in either.I have taught 12 years and have never done that. As a former sub, I try to write plans that can be followed if I'm not there. I usually have a rough idea of what I'm doing a least a week in advance.
     
  7. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,391
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jun 20, 2009

    When I taught pre-k they were required Friday morning and returned to us before we left so any changes that needed to be made could be done over the weekend (rare). After one verbal warning the next consequence was a written warning, after 3 written warnings people were generally fired or demoted to assistant positions (with a pay cut).
     
  8. pabef

    pabef Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2007
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 20, 2009

    I do make a note and put in their file, but what is the consequence after, say, 3 notes are in there? Also, for the previous poster, I would be willing to change the day of turn-in or accept an e-mail. The point is that each time I have to place a sub in their rooms, I am having to come up with activities for the sub to do last minute.
     
  9. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,391
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jun 20, 2009

    One solution I see is to have lead teachers have a emergency sub file with 1-2 days worth of general plans and activities that can be used any time of year. Our public preschool (and up) teachers are required to have an emergency sub folder with the daily schedule and plans for a day or 2 that are easy enough for any sub to follow including lunch procedures, RR procedures, etc...
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 20, 2009

    I'm sorry, but I don't think you should have to change the deadline.

    We all have a calendar. We know just how far it is until Friday. So we should all be capable of getting organized enough to get our work done before the deadline.

    It's like Christmas shopping: everyone gets the same amount of time. If you choose to do yours on Christmas Eve in the crowds, it's your choice. But you knew Christmas was coming- it's no one's fault but your own!
     
  11. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Messages:
    3,544
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 20, 2009

    So if we knew a student was having difficulty with organization in our classroom, we'd tell them 'tough luck' instead of helping them develop a system that works?

    I don't think adults are any different. That's why directors and principals are in leadership positions-to help their staff in areas they might be weak in while practicing empathy. Why would you dig your heels in and say 'that's just the way it is'? Why wouldn't you work with the staff member to find out WHY they are having issues, and work to help them with that issue? If simply changing the due date to Wednesday would help with the situation, it seems like a simple solution to me.
     
  12. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Jun 20, 2009

    We have a Friday deadline for our lesson plans and I like it. That makes me have them done by then, and means that I am not spending my weekend writing lesson plans. (Which gives me time to grade papers instead. :whistle: ) It also means I can make my copies Friday afternoon and not be running around on Monday trying ot get them done. Are you at a public school? I honestly couldn't tell you the steps if I didn't have my plans, because with one exception, I always have had them. That was after a family emergency. By Saturday I had emailed them to her. I would say start with a verbal warning, then move on to written, and I don't know what would be next. I know that at some point in the process we would have to speak to the superintendent. Have you talked to the teachers and explained why you are requiring the Friday deadline? Honestly, I don't know that the day matters. No matter when the deadline is, some are going to have problems with meeting it.
     
  13. SarahJ

    SarahJ Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2007
    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 21, 2009

    We hand ours, for the current week, in on Monday afternoon at our weekly staff meeting. Our termly planning outline is done at the beginning of the term so the principal can see where we are headed long term.
     
  14. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 21, 2009

    I wouldn't change the deadline, either. Most of your staff seems to be able to comply, and part of being a professional is complying to those "adult" guidelines. This doesn't mean I wouldn't think of ways to help those struggling teachers meet those deadlines. Thursday afternoon reminders in their box, a planning form that you design with their input, an offer to stay after school on Thursday with them for an hour helping them gather their ideas, whatever. If you change the policy because they can't meet the dealine, though, they'll just have trouble meeting the new deadline.

    In a public school, the protocol for not following a direct order is pretty clear. A verbal warning, a letter in your file (which follows you to the next school and may very well make it difficult for you to get a job at a new school), an "action plan," followed by referral to higher-level discipline at the board of ed.

    If I were you, I'd meet with both of these teachers and tell them that you are disappointed that they haven't been able to follow your policy, and I'd outline whatever steps you're able to take to help them meet your deadline. At this meeting, I'd make sure I laid out the steps that you'll take if they continue to disregard your requests. I'd call it outright insubordination.

    If your steps that you've prepared to help them meet your deadline don't work, I'd call them in for another meeting. And I'd tell them that leaving the classroom unprepared for a sub is unacceptable and could lead to them being demoted to classroom aide - so that they are relieved of this planning responsibility that they cannot live up to.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Jun 21, 2009

    I only have to turn in my plans once every 3 weeks (we have a large school- an administrator would not be able to look at EVERYONE's plans EVERY week!!)...I've been late once or twice this year (conference weeks, or report cards, or big assessment kinds of weeks...) but when that happened I went to the principal who said "Seriously, you're a tenured teacher- I'm not sure even why I need to collect plans from proven professionals-I know the good things that are going on in your room"....:love:

    As far as subs go, they wouldn't have much use for MY plans- I write them for ME. When I need a sub, I write very detailed, you-can't-possibly-screw-this-up, turn to this page, say this, kinds of plans...My weekly plans for me don't look anything like this, nor should they.

    As far as the OP- If having plans in on a specific date is important to you, let your staff know that. Deal with those who do not abide by your wishes. There's nothing worse than an entire staff having to listen to an administrator talk about lesson plan dates or signing in on time or whatever just because a few people won't 'follow the game plan'...If it's important to you as the director, make that clear and hold your employees to their responsibilities.
     
  16. Prekfreak

    Prekfreak Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2008
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 21, 2009

    We are required to turn in lesson plans but we do ours electronically through a program, so our administrator just logs on to see if they are in.
    Normally I am very good at having them "turned in" by Monday mornings but every once in a while they don't get done. The major thing that makes us do them is that parents can also log on and see my plans.
    My admin. has never said anything to me about not turning them in. She knows that there is always hand written lesson plans in my book on my desk (subs have a really hard time reading our l.p. from the program). Also, I have 2 assistants in my room that pick up right where I left off and whatever sub I get takes their job for the day.
     
  17. silver rain

    silver rain Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 21, 2009

    I think you should keep your deadline. We are grown ups and deadlines can be important. Others professionals have deadlines and meet them; teachers should be able to do the same. We are given a verbal warning or email for first time. After that we are written up and it goes in our file.Our plans (which are sent thru email) have to be turned in by Monday morning. Personally, I turn mine in on Friday before they are due. I like to plan ahead alittle and I also like to have copies made, appropriate maniputives set up, and any other special materilals I may need for the new week. I also have a sub folder if needed.
     
  18. CanukTeacher

    CanukTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 21, 2009

    I can't believe that you actually require teachers to turn in lesson plans at all. If my P asked for them, I would see it as a sign that s/he didn't trust their staff. They are welcome to come in and see what I do in my room, but they certainly don't need to read my lesson plans regularly!

    In addition, my lesson plans change all the time. The idea of writing them up a week in advance is pure lunacy as far as I'm concerned. I have long range plans, but using the theory of proximal development, DI and assessment for learning makes it impractical to assume what I do with one class in a week will look the same the next year. I know I have x number of weeks for a unit and have a rough plan, but I don't write my lesson plans out a week in advance. I have a weekly plan and then I make my daily plans on a daily basis. For example, say I was teaching how to multiple single digits on Monday. My plan for Tuesday was to introduce double digits. Well if my kids don't get single digits on Monday, I'm not moving to double digits on Tuesday - I'm going to revisit Monday's lesson from a different angle. So now I've wasted who knows how much time writing a lesson plan so my P can say "Canuk handed in her lesson plans on time." Sorry that seems crazy to me.

    If you were to require them I don't see why the teachers can't hand them in on Monday.

    To me that is a COMPLETELY different issue that making sure you have sub plans. When I have a sub my plans always change because I can do things a sub can't. If we didn't hand in sub plans my P would address that.

    I think that new styles of leadership require that P's see themselves as a support system, so if lesson plans are non-negotiable I would find a compromise (like Monday or emailed by Monday if you are sick).
     
  19. CanukTeacher

    CanukTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 21, 2009

    The other question I have is what do you do with the plans? Unless you regularly talk to teachers Monday morning about their plans I can see how teachers would see this as yet just another hoop.
     
  20. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 21, 2009

    OH, I HOPE adults ARE different than 4 year olds!!! I hope we're better able to organize our time and that we have a stronger sense of responsiblity.

    I'm sure the OP would have no problem accepting the plans early, if Fridays are all that difficult.

    And I bet you a dollar (is that allowed? :) ) that not one of those teachers mentioned a problem with Fridays when they applied for those jobs. I bet all their cover letters, all their interviews, spoke of their professionalism.

    In what other profession would we expect the rules and deadlines to change to accomodate us???

    "I'm sorry, Aliceacc. I'm running a bit behind. I'll get those biopsy results next week, or the week after at the latest."

    "I'm sorry, Your Honor. I got a bit swamped and didn't get around to getting the deposition. Can we postpone the trial until the 25th?"

    "I'm sorry, Mrs. Smith. I won't be able to get your tax return back to you by April 15th. But May 2 looks good to me."

    even "I'm sorry folks, but your appetizers won't be out for another hour and a half. The chef is a bit behind."

    Come on, Jem. I know how excited you are about Sprout. You wouldn't dream of NOT getting a back to school order to a teacher before the start of school just because you were backlogged, right??? You would pull an all-nighter if you had to, because of the pride you have in what you do, right??? Why are these teachers any different??

    Sure I'm exagerating. But why do teachers, who continually cry about the fact that we're professionals and demand to be treated as such, keep shooting ourselves in the foot??? If we claim to be professionals, we need to act and think (and, for the record, dress-- but that's a different rant) the part.
     
  21. CanukTeacher

    CanukTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 21, 2009

    I'm going to have to disagree Alice. While teachers do need to act like professionals, they also need to be treated like professionals. Can I hear the word "micromanage"? Seriously, none of my friends in other fields have to provide a detailed report of what they are going to do at work to their boss ahead of time. Asking for a lesson plan once in awhile I can understand, but asking to see them every week is micromanaging. And while Jem might stay up all night there is something wrong with a society that thinks we should all work 24-7. If a teacher is ready for class why should they have to meet a random deadline set by an admin. Of course the answer is because they are admin. But if the admin actually cares about their students and staff, as long as lesson plans are done by Monday I don't see the issue. This is actually my pet peeve - artificially early deadlines. On the basis that some teachers might not hand them in on Monday, we make all teachers hand them in on Friday. Why not make the deadline Monday and deal with people who don't hand them in on time or email them in if they are away?
     
  22. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 21, 2009

    Realistically, most deadlines in the world are artificial. Aside from the "he'll die if he doesn't get a heart by Tuesday" kind of scenario, people set deadlines when they set them. But if the person setting the deadline is our boss, we have an obligation to try to meet it. And if we're professionals, we'll do that except when an emergency prevents it.
     
  23. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Jun 21, 2009

    I hadn't read all the posts... but, I think if you set up a deadline, then you need to stick with it. Is it a possibility that plans will change? Yes, because we might need to reteach something or spend more time on a concept or less time than we thought. However, lesson plans provide the director/principal a snapshot of what we're teaching in that given week with the understanding that if they happen to stop by on a Wed we might or might not be doing what our plans say. Now, asking for strict, detailed lesson plans seem a bit overkill to me and I know that there are Ps that do this.
     
  24. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,661
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 21, 2009

    I just need to say that some of the ECE world and the K-12 world isn't neatly lined up. In many cases when a k-12 (and therefore prek teacher in the same arena) wouldn't be asked to hand in a lesson plan and would dream of doing so----in the ECE world it is sort of common place. And yes it is a hoop-----but there are many micromanagers in our world. Feds, state, licensors, parents who get to make decisions as to where they spend their dollar, accrediation experts and so on. :dizzy:

    No I am not saying it is right, but i am saying that it happends and the op probably didn't just decide to have teachers do it. She was told to as well.

    All that said, if you have a mandate and they don't then verbal, written, and move down. Otherwise when the people who needed to see the sites lesson plans arrive----it will be you that can't comply.:unsure:
     
  25. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,591
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 21, 2009

    Lesson plans are part of a good curriculum and a road map to a goal. I, too, can get through the day without a lesson plan, but need a roadmap with guideposts to make sure I stay on the right path, and keep my timing punctual. And, if it is not written down, it did not happen.

    I would imagine somewhere along the line, a plan was made. I know that I keep old ones and revise, edit and improve each year.

    How detailed you are in a lesson plan is up to you. I do usually make notes on what is to happen--even I forget.
     
  26. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,640
    Likes Received:
    57

    Jun 21, 2009

    It seems to me that this is not about lesson plans or schedules, but employees who refuse to do what is required of them. If they feel it is a stupid, unnecessary task they have the option of finding a tactful way to broach that subject and offer constructive alternatives. If Friday deadlines don't work for them, they have the option of doing most of the work over the weekend for the following Friday and then taking a few moments to update as needed.

    But, in ANY job I have ever had, 3 write-ups would mean finding a new job without a good reference. Regardless of their reasons for not complying (even if they happen to be good ones), failure to do part of their job shows a lack of respect for their job and boss.
     
  27. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Jun 21, 2009

    Love it, Alice!!:up::2up::clap:
     
  28. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Jun 21, 2009

    Maybe other professions don't turn in plans, but they do turn in budgets, sales forecasts, business reports, stock reports...all with presumably a deadline...

    And most administrators do know that plans are just that- plans...they change, but in many cases having a record of teachers' plans protects the district, the school and the teacher from accusations of educational negligence...there have been cases where teachers' plans were used as evidence that curriculum was taught...In one high school (where I taught PreK for a year-that's another story), the administration collected all plan books at the end of each school year and would keep them for a determined amount of time. State monitoring also checks with administrators about teacher preparedness and planning- the state isn't going to take someone's word that they are a professional and doing their job...just as other professions are subject to scrutiny (doctors and lawyers keep their records for indefinite amounts of time), professional educators should have some record of what they have done.
     
  29. pabef

    pabef Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2007
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 21, 2009

    Okay, I guess I did not make myself very clear. My problem with the 2 teachers is that they have no plans at all. They come in and fly by the seat of their pants - with great lessons, but sometimes relying on tv. This is why I have required lesson plans to be turned in. Also our state department checks lesson plans at random when they come and I am responsible if there are none in the class they check. I chose Friday as a deadline, because I have had instances where either or both of them have called in sick on Monday and I have had nothing for a sub to do. I have had to scramble around coming up with activites. We have a curriculum, so the lesson plans should not be that hard. These are actually 2 great teachers even though it does not sound like it. I am going to tell them that I will mark this in their file each time they do not have lesson plans or are not prepared for class and that this will affect raises or postions. The bottom line is that I am the boss and if this is what I require they should comply.
     
  30. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2005
    Messages:
    1,134
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 21, 2009

    Setting aside the issue of whether lesson plans SHOULD be required to be handed in weekly...

    I would suggest that, like another poster, you make emailing over the weekend an option. While I agree that a deadline set by administration is a deadline, and should not be ignored, I have to say that I personally think having lesson plans for next week handed in by Friday is not a great deadline. How can I plan all of next week before I have even finished this one? I could give an outline of it, I could make an educated guess of where I will be. But it would seem to me that sitting down to make my lessons before the week was through and I saw where my kids were really going to be at the end of the week, would be "working harder, not smarter." If the kids don't actually get to where I guessed they were going to, I now have to take the time to go back and redo everything....and the plans you have in your hands for my emergency Monday sub now become useless anyway. If I can email them to you on Saturday, it still gives you the plans by Monday morning, and I get to sit down after the week is over, reflect on where my kids are, and decide where they need to go next. JMHO

    If you chose to go the Saturday email route, I would suggest having a meeting, explaining the policy change and your reasoning, explaining that it is NOT an option to miss this deadline, providing a list of consequences for missing it, and then steadfastly follow through with them. If you choose to keep your deadline now, I would suggest having a meeting to review your policy, explaining that it is NOT an option to miss this deadline, providing a list of consequences for missing it, and then steadfastly follow through with them. September is always a fresh start!! Good luck.
     
  31. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 21, 2009

    Alice, you know what? I always enjoy your posts, and we have a lot in common in our viewpoints!
    Kim
     
  32. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 21, 2009

    What I see in this situation are two things:
    1. These teachers don't write sub plans. The normal situation at this center/school is that those weekly plans serve as sub plans should those teachers not come in one day. Which is why they are needed on Friday, by the way - if any teacher doesn't show up on Monday, this director is out of luck.
    2. This is not a public school. I think it's a childcare center/preschool. From my experience, the sort of problems this director is facing are much more common in this sort of setting. (which, by the way, gives a bad name to all of those wonderful, dedicated, professional preschool teachers out there!). So there is no "principal," no "formal lesson plan," etc. It's a different world than some of us live in.
     
  33. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 21, 2009

    :clap:
    Hear, hear! This is what I was saying. They need to follow the rules, just because the rules are there. And then, if they do, perhaps the rules for everyone can be relaxed in the future.
    Kim
     
  34. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 22, 2009

    Thanks Kim!

    One of the things I love about this forum is that we CAN disagree, joke around a bit, and then move on.
     
  35. wItalia

    wItalia Rookie

    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2009

    In maintaining a high quality early childhood program one of the responsabilities of a teacher is to provide a weekly written lesson plan. As a curriculum specialist I also require that all lesson plans are submitted to me by friday. As a professional teacher you are planning for what is in the best interest of the children even when you call out sick.
     
  36. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,661
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2009

    I hear the OP saying these are quality teachers....I don't see that but I don't know who they are. So, I am going to ask a question, not to defend them, but to further my understanding. If these teachers do have great lessons (but rely on tv) is it possible that they are teaching to the children developing interests like a Pre-emergent? Ha, that looks redundant typed - but I needed to make up a phrase. Offer 1 meeting about how to make a lesson plan, and how to do that based on children's interests if that is an issue, make sure all understand the needs and start writing them up and moving them on. The lack of doing what you tell them is what concerns me.
     
  37. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,378
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2009

    We are required to have a sub binder-- they are neon green and every classroom has one. It has things like daily schedule, notes on individual childrent hat a sub might need to know, the locations of important things in the room, directions for each part of our day and our daily routine, and extra "work" inc ase we call out at the last minute-- mine has name writing practice sheets and some cut and paste activities. I also have magazine holders (I thinkt hat's what they are called) that have file folders of things like wriitng practice, cut and paste, skill practice, game ideas etc on a shelf that is very visable and my sub binder references this as well as stoep by step directions for circle time, snack time etc. My director requiress us to hand in a monthly calendar and news letter for her approval. It is due on the 20th for the following month. So my montly calendar and newsletter for July is due on June 20th.
     
  38. wItalia

    wItalia Rookie

    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 23, 2009

    As a curriculum specialist I also require the teaching teams to submit a lesson plan on a weekly basis. In maintaining a high quality program and giving the best experiences and opportunities for children to learn, a professional teacher is responsable to have a writtten lesson plan posted in their classroom. If a teacher is absent the lessons should continue, remember as an early childhood professional you are keeping in mind what is in the best interest of the child.
     
  39. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2008
    Messages:
    384
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 23, 2009

    I think to keep happy employees (you do want to keep these two teachers?), you need to find a common ground. Ask them what would make it easier for them to comply . . . a different day deadline, examples of how you want the lesson plans done, resources to go to get ideas, etc. I know some people on here think that if they are given a directive from the boss, they had better follow it! (And I agree, to a point.) But the best places I've worked, the ones where I was happy to give my all, had a boss who was willing to listen, help, and compromise when needed.

    As a sidenote, the differences between private pre-school and public school are extraordinary to me. My mother has not had to turn a lesson plan in almost her whole public school career, whereas my last job in Head Start we had to turn in a whole month's worth in advance! It was due the last school day of the month before, and several people examined it and could tell me to do it over. One of the reasons I'm not with HS anymore, but that's another story . . .
     
  40. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,563
    Likes Received:
    4

    Jun 23, 2009

    When I taught preschool, we had to have our lesson plans turned in on paper each Friday. These plans were no where near as detailed as what is required by my elementary school principal.

    I was able to use the time while the kids were napping to work on my lesson plans for the coming week. I had plenty of time.

    If we didn't turn them in, we got a letter in our box that was our warning. It was not rude but it was in professional language. We had to sign it and turn it in. It went in our file. I assume we had so many chances.
     
  41. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,563
    Likes Received:
    4

    Jun 23, 2009

    PS- we also had to post our lesson plans on our door so moms and dads could see them.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ChemTeachBHS,
  2. YoungTeacherGuy,
  3. sevenplus,
  4. Caesar753,
  5. TeacherWhoRuns,
  6. Ima Teacher
Total: 287 (members: 10, guests: 260, robots: 17)
test