Consequences for Food in the Classroom

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by substeacher, Apr 7, 2017.

  1. substeacher

    substeacher Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2015
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    13

    Apr 7, 2017

    For those who do not allow food in the classroom, what consequences do you have for students bringing food into the room anyways?
     
  2.  
  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    10,217
    Likes Received:
    2,534

    Apr 7, 2017

    What is school policy? Some schools allow students to have food/drink with them throughout the day.
     
  4. substeacher

    substeacher Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2015
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    13

    Apr 7, 2017

    Mine doesn't allow food outside of the cafeteria. That's why I am curious to know what consequences others give out to students bringing food into the room when it's against the rules.
     
  5. MsAbeja

    MsAbeja Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2016
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    109

    Apr 7, 2017

    I struggle with this one, as far as whether or not I should ban food in the classroom. I myself often find that my hunger cues don't often coincide with our nutrition and lunch breaks, and I sometimes eat something quick during class. Maybe it's unprofessional? I don't know. But as long as the students aren't eating candy or junk food, and don't leave a mess or distract their peers, I tend to look the other way.

    I'm not sure what I'd do if I had a hard and fast rule against food and found students breaking it. Confiscate the food until the end of class? Follow my classroom management plan (warning, seat move, send outside, referral) if the rule was repeatedly broken?
     
    Peregrin5 likes this.
  6. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,001

    Apr 8, 2017

    For me personally, I tell them to set it to the side of my room and they can get it after class is over. Though sometimes I just let them eat, particularly if it's not right after lunch or a major break, and they might be hungry. I make them promise me that there will be no mess or that privilege goes away.
     
  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    10,217
    Likes Received:
    2,534

    Apr 8, 2017

    In a prior job, students "couldn't" eat, but did with impunity. Since I am science, no food on tables, because they never knew what might have been there previously - dissections, experiments, chemicals. Food could not go there, but I didn't have a problem with them grabbing a few bites out of their backpacks. ONLY EXCEPTIONS - one year we had highly sensitive students with nut allergies, which meant extra caution, but it was explained so they understood I was looking out for their health. No problems.
     
  8. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,768
    Likes Received:
    995

    Apr 8, 2017

    It is a rule in my classroom (not sure if it is in every classroom), but we've had problems with rodents (they were in my desk, eating my granola bars). However the reason I chose to not allow food years ago is because it is very disruptive. The kid eating is usually not paying attention, can't write or read while he's eating, it is messy, it is loud (bags of chips) and then he offers it to others, or they're asking, etc.)

    Whenever I've had students walk in with food, my reaction did vary depending on the situation:
    - walking in with an unopened bag of chips. Let him know that he can't eat it, and he must put it away. If he opens it, I'll take it away. Most high school students understand this and it's not a problem.
    - sometimes they walk in, and the bell will ring in 1-2 minutes. I allow them to stand outside the classroom, next to a trashcan, finish it, and come inside before the bell rings. Of course some wants to abuse this and take their time, but then I warn them that I will take it away. This is usually food that needs to be eaten, cup of noodles, sandwich, etc., not chips or crackers that can be put away.
    - kid opens up a bag of chips in classroom: I have taken it away (simply took it off the desk), put it on my desk and told them they can have it in the end, but most of the time I ask for it, and they give it to me. If it's a kid that is a habitual offender, I don't waste time, I just take it.
    - and yes, there have been times when I took the food and dumped it in the trashcan, but this was in the case of the kid always bringing food in, being very disruptive, and refusing to obey my directions. Of course you have to know your kids, your admin, and I wouldn't use this as a first time consequence.

    We don't give detention, and there's no point in sending a kid out for this, so for me, a natural consequence is that you either won't have access to the food until you leave my classroom, or lose it completely because you're always being a problem.
     
    MathGuy82 and substeacher like this.
  9. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Apr 8, 2017

    The first time, I tell them to put it away and remind them they can't have it. After that, it gets thrown out. Usually there isn't much left when they're throwing it out. If their previous class had food, I will let them finish that.
     
  10. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,857
    Likes Received:
    1,476

    Apr 8, 2017

    I have students put it away if they're eating when they're not supposed to be.

    It's more of a problem for us outside of the classroom, like on the playground or in our parent pickup area. They're not supposed to be eating there, but it's not enforced by all teachers, leaving the kids thinking they can get away with it and those of us who do enforce it seem like the mean teachers.
     
  11. rpan

    rpan Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    639
    Likes Received:
    470

    Apr 9, 2017

    I think teacher discretion comes into play here. Yes, there are rules and what not, but we are professionals and our judgement counts for something. I'll let a student who got kept in at lunchtime to eat their lunch outside and come in when they have finished. Or a student who missed breakfast can have 5 minutes to eat something. As long as they don't sneak food, are upfront with me, ask politely and throw their trash in the bin, I don't see why not. Sometimes a little understanding and kindness goes a long way.
     
    MathGuy82 likes this.
  12. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    571

    Apr 9, 2017

    first time offenders, or the first couple of times it happens in class - kids put food away. After that, food is taken until the end of class. If a student has had a warning or two already, I might keep the food until the end of the day or the next day.

    If a student shoves in food after I just told him to put it away, that is another issue. Then we spend some time together during detention.
     
  13. MathGuy82

    MathGuy82 Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2016
    Messages:
    156
    Likes Received:
    73

    Apr 15, 2017

    I allow students to eat as long as they take notes. I say, you can eat food as long as you are learning the material. If you can't take notes because of eating, then the student will have to catch up later on by tutoring.lI say in my syllabus at the high school and college level, that he/she is responsible for all material. That means if they decide to doze off, even though I don't allow talking in my lectures for either high school or college, it's THEIR responsibility. I work in an alternative school so this is how it goes. I mean I work with mostly title 1 students, so if they are hungry they will not learn. Teenagers need to eat and I say if they can learn and have food, then it's allowed. If they have a medical problem that says they need food at all times, I allow them but let them know in the real world you may have to go several hours without food while working to get your paycheck. I work with students that say (as well as counselors) that they don't get fed in the morning before school. So, if students are hungry, that means low blood sugar or dizziness, which means no learning. I also teach college level students on the side during evenings and during the summer. A little food, as long as they are learning, is not a big deal. My college students will bring meals in during the evening while I am lecturing. Many will do well or make A's. I'm more worried about the one's who have attitude or disruptive than the one's who bring in a snack or meal. If they are on time, pass, and don't cause disruption in the class, I leave it up to them. I've realized, even though in an ideal situation it would be better to not have food in class ( I never brought food in class at high school or college because I was geared on learning to the full), many students these days come from broken families or time crunches that don't allow the student to eat properly. This is sad to say but true. Some of the stories you hear now days may seem suspicious but are true and quite sad with some of our students at alternative schools. My saying goes "if you are hungry you eat, if you are sick or have problems with family take off, but at the end you need to pass with a 70 or better to move to the next class, regardless of your absences, doze off days, eating days, or anything else. I just had to tell several students that they would need to repeat my class next year at my high school and they understood. I wish more schools would put emphasis on the "the actual student" rather than teacher observations. It's up to the student if they want to learn. Sorry to say but I think it's true.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2017

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 230 (members: 1, guests: 213, robots: 16)
test