Condensation

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Miss Kirby, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Jan 30, 2011

    Last year I tried an experiment from a Core Knowledge unit with my class on condensation. They had a paper cup of room temp. water, added an ice cube, and ....... no condensation. I am trying to figure out what to do this year but I can't figure it out. The best option seems to be the water cycle in a bag, but I have no windows in my classroom. Any suggestions please? I teach this Wednesday.... :\ Thanks.

    I found this video online.... it looks like a great start to a lesson... but it only shows the first few minutes. I love the review on solid/liquid/gas because we just did that last week.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/MissLark9#p/a/u/0/6dpC_oNrIM0
     
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  3. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Jan 30, 2011

    I can't remember the exact details, but I did something that I think was probably similar to your paper cup one. We used soup cans, though, and definitely got condensations. Maybe that would help?
     
  4. wrice

    wrice Habitué

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    Jan 30, 2011

    Video shows a great start with the hot water and the mirror. Arizona may be too dry but you can put out a glass of ice water and see condensation on the side. Put another mirror in a freezer and it will condense water in the air once you take it out. But best is if you can make use of an especially cloudy or foggy day to talk about dew point and temperature, real life and easy field trip. Take a hotplate and set some colored water to boil in a small pot, then set a big glass bowl on top- neat to see the condensate is clear water and the food coloring remains
     
  5. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Cloudy days are rare in AZ. Especially fog. I'm hoping for partly cloudy when I teach about clouds (after this condensation experiment).
     
  6. smurfette

    smurfette Habitué

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    Add a match to all of that stuff and you can make clouds. Put the ice cubes in a baggie and a little warm water in a clear cup/jar/glass. Drop a lighted match into the cup and quickly cover with the baggie. There will be a little bit of smoke, but you will see a cloud form near the baggie, where the air is cold. It's easier to see the cloud if you put a piece of black construction paper behind the jar/cup.

    Normally, I like kids to do all parts of the experiment, but since it involved fire, I did the match part for the students. I told my principal ahead of time that I would be lighting matches, and I made sure that the box stayed in my possession at all times.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 30, 2011

    Hot water in a tupperware with a lid...put ice on top of the lid.
     
  8. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    We will put a well watered plant in a large ziplock and leave it for several days in the sun (or in the growlab). When you look at the bag you can see the condensation. It's a self-watering system.
     
  9. teach'ntx

    teach'ntx Comrade

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    We put ice in a cup and let it sit for a little bit then added water to it. Next I walked around and added food coloring (so they would know the water did not come through the cup). We got condensation.
     
  10. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Jan 31, 2011

    What kind of cup did you use? Paper or plastic or glass? :)
     
  11. teach'ntx

    teach'ntx Comrade

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    Feb 1, 2011

    plastic clear cups. This way they could see the inside and the out. It worked really well. I did let them sit for awhile before we observed the condensation. I set everything up and then had them write in their journals about the experiment and then we observed the condensation.
     
  12. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Feb 1, 2011

    Okay so I guess I'll set it up with the ice before we start the lesson so we have time to see some condensation. I just need some plastic cups! Might bring some glasses from home if I don't have time though... Thanks!
     
  13. teach'ntx

    teach'ntx Comrade

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    Feb 2, 2011

    We just had some cheap plastic throw away ones.
    Best of luck!!!
     
  14. 773 Miles Away

    773 Miles Away Comrade

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    Feb 7, 2011

    I brought in a hot plate and boiled water and held a large plastic frozen ice pack above the steam to show what happens when warm moisture touches something cold, it's pretty cool.
     

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