Computers

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Hls2011, Oct 21, 2015.

  1. Hls2011

    Hls2011 New Member

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    Oct 21, 2015

    When (approximately) did it start becoming typical for teachers to use computers in the classroom (for their own work use)? Doing some book writing research :).
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 21, 2015

    I don't know. They were using computers when I was in High School. I don't remember many in Elementary or middle.
     
  4. Hls2011

    Hls2011 New Member

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    Oct 21, 2015

    I was thinking the same thing. I remember having computer class in elementary school and above, but I don't remember when teachers started using them in their own rooms. Thanks for the response.
     
  5. Amanda

    Amanda Administrator Staff Member

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    Oct 21, 2015

    I'd say sometime between 1993 and 1997 as the Internet started to become a key player in education. I started student teaching in 1997 and recall teachers having computers starting very close to that time. I had a computer in my classroom my first year of teaching (1998), but not all teachers were comfortable with them yet. I remember when they started sending announcements via email vs. a handout and some teachers freaked. I graduated high school in 1993 and I do not remember any of my teachers having a computer outside of the computer lab. I'm sure this varies by district as not all had money set aside to purchase computers for every classroom early on.

    Side Note: I started A to Z Teacher Stuff in the fall of 1997. The Internet was starting to become popular around that time. That was when AOL mailed out free trial discs to everyone. Some of you may be too young to remember the days without Internet. ;)
     
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  6. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Oct 21, 2015

    Elem we had kids that the teacher recommended for comp classes a few times a year. High school took computer class old computer. I still took typing on type writer as a Jr. We had our first home PC in high school.
     
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  7. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Oct 21, 2015

    I just had a flashback!

    Freshman year: I was making up a test in my teacher's class during lunch. She was eating with a colleague and said, "I don't know why they gave me this big ol' thing. I'm never gonna use it, anyway!" She was referring to her new PC. All teachers were given desktops that year.

    I didn't get an email address until I was 16 or 17 years old.

    When doing research projects back in elementary, middle, and early high school, I used encyclopedias. I remember my mom saying, "Take good care of your encyclopedias. You'll need these when you have kids of your own." :eek:
     
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  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    For me it was 1994-some it was 1995. That seemed like the years where it became the big change.
     
  9. PoliticalFutbol

    PoliticalFutbol Rookie

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    Oct 26, 2015

    About 1983 or 84.

    At that time teachers had programs for grading - entering and computing grades, but not submitting the grades on-line - just printing them out. The programs were not that great, so I wrote my own using BASIC that was dedicated to my specific grading policies and methodology. Teachers were also able to use software for printing tests, or demonstrating lessons in a computer lab. The Radio Shack "Trash 80" (forgot the actual name) was quite popular at that time. I was also able to write programs for student practice sheets and labs. I copyrighted them as Paperlabs by Virtual Dynamics in 1984 which I later changed to guessandcheckdiscovery. My programs would print "time lapse cartoons" of science or math labs which required students to use ruler, protractor, etc. At the press of a button I could dole out several same-different practice labs.

    For example, I could hand out 4 lab papers on collision and momentum to each student in a group of four. Each paper in this example, was on momentum and collision, but each diagram differed in the velocities, masses and sizes of the colliding objects. So while the group as a whole could brain storm the over-all solution, each group member had to do his/her own work - make his/her own measurements of size, velocity, angles, etc. and each group member had to do his or her own calculations. Students could take the paperlab home with them - they could virtually do the lab at home. One of the things the students learned was how computers made such possible. They realized more about the power of programming.

    In the mid 80’s calculators were still a big deal. I wrote a calculator course as one of the paperlabs – just for the simple electronic calculator. From that work, I came up with the idea “How To Orbit The Earth” which was published in the 1984 issue of “The Science Teacher Magazine.”

    I wrote paperlabs for practically every major topic in physics. It was a lot of programming time - much more than I thought. Also, while my students did well, and I was selling the idea that my programs could help students make it through their first year in college, many people in the community as well as principals and college professors were saying things like "all students need to learn." I felt a lot of anger from a lot of people. So I don't think my ideas ever had a chance to sell. It was probably around the early 2000's that I gave up on my dedicated methods.

    I really didn't start using the internet until about 1998. By that time many big companies were putting out a lot of software. On-line grading (so students and parents could log.in and see their grades) didn’t really take off until about 2004. I was selected to help evaluate Power School back in 2003. It was supposed to be compatible with Microsoft Excel. I never did really like it – very cumbersome.

    It has taken me awhile to adjust to software because it is not dedicated to my specific style of teaching. I still do some programming - mostly limited to Microsoft Excel.
     

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