Complaints about your student teachers?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by jessiiteach, Dec 29, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jessiiteach

    jessiiteach Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 29, 2011

    Hi all,

    I will begin my full time student teaching in a few weeks and was hoping to get insight on what student teachers have done that made you unhappy.

    I had a friend who had a really bad student teaching experience because her supervising teacher and the other teachers did not like her. By the book she did everything right, but there was something else going on that wasn't so clear cut and was not addressed. She just knew she was not liked because they all ignored her/were catty.

    I don't want to inadvertently do something that irks my supervising teacher, so please fill me in if you have insight!

    Thanks!
     
  2.  
  3. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,778
    Likes Received:
    153

    Dec 29, 2011

    I did have one incident. My ST wrote a note discipline form to the parents about a particular student without informing me. I just would have liked to have been in the loop on that. So, I would say, don't make big decisions without your CT's knowledge.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Dec 29, 2011

    Be gracious and observant. Don't act like a know-it-all. Get your lesson plans done in a timely manner.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,948
    Likes Received:
    2,096

    Dec 29, 2011

    Dress professionally. Start 'jumping in' as appropriate as soon as possible. Come early. Stay as late as the classroom teacher. Have your plans ready ahead of time for approval before you teach.
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,752
    Likes Received:
    979

    Dec 29, 2011

    When I was student teaching, the teachers told me that none of them wanted a student teacher, because of the bad experiences they had. One teacher was just horrible at classroom management, and clearly teaching wasn't for her. But another one was just plain unprofessional. She would show up 5 minutes before school started, even after the teacher talked to her. One day (after the talk) the teacher was supposed to be out, (but actually had to go in last minute) and the student teacher still showed up 5 min. before time. She ended up getting reassigned to another school.

    All the teachers told me I was the best student teacher they ever had - I did everything I was supposed to, and more. Came early, stayed late, didn't complain. I reached out to other teachers for advice in a positive way. I asked questions, and they all knew I wanted to learn as much as possible. I was VERY enthusiastic :)
     
  7. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,277
    Likes Received:
    743

    Dec 29, 2011

    The know-it-all thing is very annoying.
     
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,946
    Likes Received:
    3

    Dec 29, 2011

    The only blip in my experiences as a student teacher was when I sent a student to the office for attacking another student in the hall during class transition. In my mind, when you attack a student (to the point bruised and bloody marks are left on his legs), you need to be removed from the situation. Apparently, the principal found that to be ridiculous and she sent the student back immediately and didn't much hide her displeasure at my wasting of her time...the student was respectful to me, but he reported she made light of it and didn't even "see him" about his behavior.

    When my cooperating teacher returned later (she would spend the majority of the day in the lounge), she explained the principal's take on such incidents. Basically, that fight wasn't worthy of office time. I disagreed then and I disagree now, but my point is this: know how the school handles such discipline issues. The school had no formal system so I acted using what I thought was common sense, but... :)

    Besides this incident (which again, happened in the hall), I had no discipline concerns mainly because my students were awesome but also because it's one of my strengths, but it's important to know just in case.
     
  9. SuperFudge

    SuperFudge Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 29, 2011

    Always keep in mind that your cooperating teacher has his/her own lesson plans, students, parents, papers to grade, committees, his/her own family/personal life, and now you. Always be more of a help than adding to his/her extra duties.

    I had one that called me at 9:00 the night before her professor came to go over her lesson. She was well aware that I had an infant at home. I also had to sit down and have a conversation with her about being professional because she was outwardly flirting with our art teacher, put student pictures on facebook, and told students about her own discipline problems when she was in school....sigh!
     
  10. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,598
    Likes Received:
    35

    Dec 29, 2011

    I also agree with the suggestion that you not be a "know it all" because we had 2 of those last semester. It's ok to think something and not say it. Our 3rd ST will probably get a job because he's really personable and he can coach but his coop. teacher will not recommend him. He was just too needy. You'd tell him something and he'd forget. He didn't seem to be able to do more than 1 thing at a time.
    Don't get caught up in drama, just do the best job you can. Good luck!
     
  11. teacherheath

    teacherheath Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2009
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 29, 2011

    A colleague had a student teacher who she felt came across as a know-it-all and was constantly overstepping her boundaries. It's sad because she burned a lot of bridges and will likely have a hard time finding a job. Sometimes when you're fresh out of school you might think some things are old and outdated (and they MIGHT be!) but there are ALWAYS things you can learn from others. I recommend being enthusiastic, respect your cooperating teacher and colleagues and go above and beyond.
     
  12. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,233
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2011

    I've had some wonderful ST, and just two that were a PITA. One was often late or didn't show up, and she was often unprepared. I didn't recommend her to move on, and she took the class over when she had less "personal things going on".

    The other was a know-it-all. She constantly spoke up at lunch when she should have sat there quietly. She may have been right, but she failed to understand that sometimes teachers are just venting; they aren't looking for advice on how to teach, especially from someone who hasn't taught her own class before.

    She won't be hired in this county. The principal even found her to be annoying, and I'm sure he will put his two cents in when she applies elsewhere and those principals call him to see how she did.
     
  13. eddygirl

    eddygirl Companion

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2011

    I did my student teaching when I was 40 years old. I had already taught (as a full-time sub) for a whole year right before that, and had worked various sub positions at schools for the previous 4 years. I was very surprised when my cooperating teacher still treated me like I was a "fresh-faced" college student when I came into her room. At that point, I realized that no matter how much experience I had, I was still under her supervision and had to do things the way she wanted them done. I packed up my ego, followed her procedures exactly, and made sure that everything I taught passed her inspection first.

    I had my first student teacher last year, and I can now say I understand where she was coming from. My young student teacher worked very hard to do a good job, but he struggled with keeping organized and was not, in some cases, knowledgeable about the content.

    I would suggest that you know your content well, be respectful of procedures, and above all, check with your cooperating teacher before you make a move. After all, he/she is ultimately responsible for the classroom and should always be aware of anything that goes on there.
     
  14. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    593
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2011

    My mentor teacher appreciated that I prepared lessons ahead of time, was VERY enthusiastic, and thought IEP meetings were the most interesting things ever. :)
     
  15. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,726
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 30, 2011

    I haven't read all the replies so forgive me if there are duplicates. My advice is more on what you can do to insure your success.

    Dress appropriately
    Take initiative
    Find ways to be helpful without overstepping boundaries
    Be friendly and courteous to EVERYONE
    Establish authority and respect with the students and not friendship.
    Always be overprepared.
    Be willing to accept constructive criticism. You are there to learn.

    Best of luck. I hope it's a wonderful experience.
     
  16. Curiouscat

    Curiouscat Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2011

    A few years ago we had a student teacher that had to spend a few hours observing other teachers in other grade levels. Imagine our horror when she sat in the lounge and criticized them in front of us! When she observed the gym teacher she took over stating, "You are doing this all wrong. I will show you the right way to do this. Sit down, please." The poor gym teacher was speechless.
    She was scheduled to observe me, but I backed out of it because that was the year I had a student that would hide under his desk and cry, one that was a selective mute and would pee her pants right in the room, and one who was angry and violent. I couldn't hack knowing she was going to criticize me! Plus, these students were making progress, and I wasn't going to let her take away from that progress.
    Another thing to remember, many teaching staffs are very close. If a teacher is dealing with a personal issue such as divorce, illness, etc. then don't stick your nose in the middle of the conversations unless you are invited.
    Also, listen, listen, listen! God gave you two ears and only one mouth for a reason!
    Best of luck to you. I am sure you will do well because you obviously care. I hope you are blessed with a wonderful cooperating teacher who is looking forward to learning from you as much as you learn from her:)
     
  17. Curiouscat

    Curiouscat Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2011

    Call other teachers by Mr. or Mrs. until told to do otherwise. It shows respect.
    Make sure your body is covered up. I have heard many teachers and even other employers complain that young ladies wear their shirts way too low cut. Bend down and then look to see what your students will be seeing all day.
    Don't try to befriend the students. You are not there to be there friend.
    Always carry your own pencil. Every time I use somebody else 's pencil, I get pink eye!!
     
  18. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,881
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2011

    Very good advice so far. Sitting through many student teacher interviews, I am still surprised by attitudes of some of the candidates. I sat through one last month where the candidate did not know vital information that was required from the university, and was very much of a "know-it-all" attitude. That did not sit well with either representative from the schools.
     
  19. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,752
    Likes Received:
    979

    Dec 30, 2011


    Yes !! I have always done that! I also subbed in my daughter's school, so I already knew the teachers, and after I started subbing they all liked me, and we all got along great. Some of these teachers were younger than me, but I still called them Mr / Miss / Mrs so and so. Only one teacher told me "Please call me Vicky" so she was the only one who I called by first name.

    Even now, where I am learn term subbing, I feel like I am definitely a part of the teaching team and the teachers view me as one of them. Yet, I still address everyone as Mr / Mrs. The teachers call the principal by her first name, I feel that I cannot / should not do that until she tells me to do so.
     
  20. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,778
    Likes Received:
    153

    Dec 30, 2011

    It's definitely important to be professional and respectful at all times. Also, you are there to learn. While you likely have a lot to offer, remember that you are there to learn from the CT and your ST experience overall. I think many teachers becomes frustrated with STs who think they already have it all figured out. That type of attitude is not appealing in anyone.
     
  21. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    Messages:
    899
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2011

    During my field experiences/observations I have always received positive feedback about my enthusiasm. I ask to attend meetings, give everyone with whom I come into contact with (admin. assts., custodians, principals) a friendly smile, ask the host teacher if I can help him/her with anything, and participate in class. That last one is the most difficult for me because I instinctively want to sit in the back and observe, but many teachers have noted my "eagerness" to integrate into the classroom. Best of luck!
     
  22. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,458
    Likes Received:
    1,338

    Dec 30, 2011

    The only student teacher I have ever kicked out of my room was the one who walked in on the first day, shook my hand and introduced himself, and then told me I could leave because he was ready to take over the class. He lasted three weeks in my room and then they transferred him to another school to see if it would be a better situation. He lasted two weeks at that school before they kicked him out.
     
  23. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    5

    Dec 30, 2011

    I had one master teacher who was very strict and very regimented. I spent a lot of time watching and just doing as I was told. To this day I'm not sure if that was the right thing to do or if it came off as my not having initiative. I always felt like when I asserted myself she would give me a disaproving look, so I got to a point where I just waited for orders. She gave me a very good review and letter of recommendation when I left, so I guess it was okay.

    My second master teacher was having an affair the whole time I was with her. She spent a lot of time texting the guy and told me a lot of things about her personal life and marriage that I didn't need to know. It was a very bizarre situation for me to be in. The one good thing about that was that I got a lot of experience in the classroom and she'd back me up because she wasn't there all the time. I was very glad that the two placements were in the order they were, because if I'd been with the really relaxed teacher first and then went into the stricter teacher's room it might have been a difficult adjustment.

    The moral is: be ready for anything! :lol:

    Before I went into teaching, when I worked in human resources, I was always amazed at the number of people who came in for interviews with wild hair, tattoos showing, too-tight or low-cut clothing. People can get as offended as they like about others "judging" them based on their appearance, but the fact is, it happens whether you like it or not. Although we use the term "student" teachers, you really are no longer a student and can no longer conduct yourself with the same freedoms a student once you're in a placement. People are putting the most precious things in their lives into your hands, and you have to project the image of someone responsible for childrens safety and well-being. Once you're employed full-time you can follow a relaxed dress code if that's what the school has, but I really think when you're fist starting out, conservative and uptight looking is the best way to go.

    Also, be open to suggestions. I know the one thing veterans at any job get irked about is when the offer suggestions to newbies and are met with resistance. Although student teachers have all kinds of ideas, dreams and new information inside their heads from classes, there is still more to learn from teachers in the trenches. There's plenty of time to do it your way after the student teaching is over.

    Good luck!
     
  24. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    5

    Dec 30, 2011

    WHAHAHAHAHAH!!!! That's hilarious! Somewhere between confidence and arrogance is a line that one can really cross!
     
  25. mommafran

    mommafran Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 30, 2011

    Pointers

    I had a fellow student teacher kicked out of school for the following reasons:

    1. Don't get to friendly with the teachers...you are not their colleague or friend.

    2. Do not give out the classroom's phone number to friends or family under any circumstances. There is nothing worse than getting a phone call in the middle of a lesson.

    3. Do not share your personal information with anyone.

    4. Be prepared and respectful.

    I did the aforementioned and got an A plus the highest recommendation from my coop. teacher and supervising prof. best wishes!!
     
  26. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,849
    Likes Received:
    714

    Dec 30, 2011

    I've never had a ST (getting a practicum student this spring though), but I can say some things that my co-op teacher told me about former people that had been in her building that people weren't happy about.

    -Unprofessional dress. At the end of my ST, my CT literally told me I was the only ST she'd ever had who didn't show their butt crack at some point. I'm not kidding.
    -Being a know it all. Sometimes people in University programs with little/no teaching experience think they know everything about teaching because they've heard all the latest theories and read all the latest research. Be open to suggestions. Even if you don't agree with something your CT does, it's not your place to say so. Offer suggestions only when asked, and then be respectful and professional. One thing I had struggled with in previous field experiences (before "real" student teaching) was asking my CT a lot of questions, which to some came off as rude/not wanting their help. In reality, my parents are teachers, all of our family friends are teachers, I was close to several of my professors...I had so many other people in my life that I was more comfortable with that I didn't always think to ask my CT a whole lot.
    -Make sure your CT knows your university requirements and what's expected of you and the CT. I found that a lot of CT's were offended that we didn't "jump in" right away. The problem was, we had all these university assignments that required us to observe first, and if you didn't just observe there was no way you could do the assignment. I found I needed to show my CT what I needed to do and explain why I would just be observing the first couple of days so there was no confusion.
    -Don't share too much of your personal life, even if you are close with your CT keep it professional. Remember, you are a guest and as harsh as this may sound, not a "real" staff member yet. Even if other teachers spill their guts in the lounge at lunch, you never know who you might be offending or rubbing the wrong way if you share too many personal things.
     
  27. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Dec 31, 2011

    When I did my first field experience in Fall 2009, I did it with my old special education teacher. When I first saw her that first day, she recognized me instantly, even though we had not seen each other in like... 11 years (I left her class when I was eight). One of the first things she said was "you can call me <her first name> if you want"

    At the end of it she said I was a wonderful observer and excellent with the students (She had me help them out like when one was absent the day before, she had me help the student with what she missed while she taught the others). Only comment she had was that I should dress a bit more professionally (I would wear a button up shirt, pants (not sweatpants or jeans, just plain old pants no design on them or anything) and sneakers) and that I was excellent with the students because of my experiences as a student with a disability.

    Hopefully I will get to do my second field experience with her, as she is one of the only special education teachers in my local district (I will be applying for field experience with a hardship waiver, as I cannot drive, and taxis are rather expensive, so the only schools I can do field experiences in must be near my house) at a school near my house. Maybe I will get to do my student teaching with her. That would be nice. I have a feeling she only rated me so highly in my first experience because she knew me already and knew that I am rather... reticent to ask questions. She was just happy to have a former student be in her classroom for a field experience (as when I had her, she taught the multiply handicapped room and most of my classmates had disorders such as downs, CP, and general MR)
     
  28. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,948
    Likes Received:
    2,096

    Dec 31, 2011

    While its comfortable to work with your former teacher, it is important to sometimes step out of that comfort zone. I would hope any CT, whether a former teacher or not, would rate STs based on their performance and potential. Ask questions, bros. Jump in, you'll make mistakes...but that's how we learn.:) when is your next placement? Good luck to you!:thumb:
     
  29. Curiouscat

    Curiouscat Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 31, 2011

    First of all, I love this discussion! I wish colleges would print this, and hand it to all future student teachers:)

    Student teachers need to realize things don't move quickly in education. There is quite a bit of red tape. Sometimes as a teacher our hands are tied. For example, when calling children's services we don't always find out how they dealt with our concerns. CS doesn't always deal with things the way we want them to deal with it. This can be frustrating especially after we have called several times.

    Another example would be testing. Often we know there is a problem, but we have to jump through many hoops to get the child tested. This is just as frustrating to us as it is to you.

    We don't like the slowness or red tape anymore than you do, but we have learned to do our best. As a student teacher, please realize that ranting about how things should be doesn't really help the whole situation. We know how it should be, but we have learned to accept there is a big difference between reality and our wishes.

    I am not saying this to be mean. I know from my own experience as a student teacher and from watching other newbies how hard this lesson is to learn. It is heartbreaking and frustrating to find out you can't solve the problems of the world:(
     
  30. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    458
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 31, 2011

    Yes to both of these. My ST was pretty great.

    However, the demands of the MA program meant that he did not have time really to master the content. He had no educational background in it, either. The result was that he really, really hesitated to "jump in" and when he did he could feel that it wasn't quite what it could have been. Knowing the content is extremely important.

    Also, while observing, it's tempting to smile or laugh with the students when they are cutting up. The problem is that you're setting yourself up as a peer. When it's time to run the room, will they respect your authority? And how will the CT like it if she's trying to get them to stay on task and you're laughing along with some side conversation?

    I think it's useful to keep in mind that you can have a very positive experience and yet there will be criticisms. I liked my ST very much and I think he'll be a good teacher. Nevertheless, he wasn't perfect and neither, I'm sure, was I.
     
  31. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,060
    Likes Received:
    538

    Dec 31, 2011

    I haven't had at ST, but I have been one recently. I received great reviews, so here are my tips:

    1. You are a guest in someone's classroom. I had a totally opposite teaching style than one of my CTs. Too bad. She wanted me to do it her way, and she made that very clear to me. I did it her way because at the end of it all, she is still responsible for what happens in her classroom. I also learned a lot from her - she truely is an excellent educator, and the units that I left with are golden. I tweaked the plans when I got my own classroom, but I learned a different approach, and it works for her.

    2. Don't be afraid to make mistakes and ask questions. You are there to LEARN. Always discuss lessons with your CT before you teach them. And be open to any suggestions he/she will make. They have years of experience and know what works.

    3. Ask to go to meetings.

    4. If your CT has recess duty, you better be out there too!

    5. Dress appropriately for the culture of your school.

    6. Make sure everyone in the office knows who you are. Secretaries run the school and work very closely with the principals. If you can get along with the secretaries, you are in!

    7. Soak it all in!! Having your own class is scary at the beginning, so enjoy the supportive environment.
     
  32. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    458
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 31, 2011

    So..this helped me crystallize something that bothered me about my ST.

    I kept all my notes from college and when I was a TA in graduate school. When it was time to make my own course, I used those notes as the foundation.

    But my ST just sat in my class. He took no notes. He didn't want to lecture (I offered repeatedly) because he felt that he wouldn't do it in a way I'd like, but he also didn't take down anything in my lectures. Nor did he record anything about what we did in class.

    It's possible that he doesn't want to approach his own classroom the way I do. If so, that's ok.

    But I think MissScrimmage makes a good point about what one can learn from the CT. And I was pretty surprised that my ST, with no background in the subject area, chose to watch and listen without recording any of it for future use. I think there's a lot to learn from everyone, including people whose approach differs from yours.
     
  33. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,060
    Likes Received:
    538

    Dec 31, 2011

    It certainly helped when my CT and I became grade level partners a few years later! I knew we had different styles, but also that her methods were based on solid research. If nothing else, it's a great opportunity to see another person's perspective and approach. As a ST, don't be hasty to judge your CTs methods. While you may be knowledgable about "current trends", your CT is too, but may be choosing to use something else that is tried and true. Ask your CT about their choices in lesson planning and delivery. Broaden your horizons.
     
  34. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,958
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 31, 2011

    I agree! Ask for advice, learn what to do and maybe even what not to do, and remember it is not your room! There will be a time when everything goes your way - but not quite yet.

    I am grade level chair and we had 2 new teachers this year (not student teachers but brand new teacher nonetheless).

    One is open to ideas, asks for help, and is a go-getter.
    The other thinks she knows everything, doesn't stay for meetings, and is pretty lazy.....

    The second cut herself off from help from the get-go. We go out of our way to help teacher #1. It IS important to be like-able! :p
     
  35. ally06

    ally06 Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 1, 2012

    I have had quite a few student teachers and most of them have been wonderful, however there have been a few annoyances.

    One decided on her first day to tell me how I should discipline the class after they played up. Another was quite a know-it-all and kept trying to give a student detention when I repeatedly explained why I did not want to give him a detention and the steps I was taking to deal with it.

    One seemed to have many reasons for not being able to attend staff meetings. Sorry, I know they are on every week but that is part of our job.

    The great student teachers observe, ask questions and get clarification when needed, jump in and help in the classroom, use initiative, are well planned and are polite and friendly to all staff, parents and students.
     
  36. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Jan 1, 2012

    Fall 2012, then student teaching Spring 2013. Finally got all the issues sorted out (had to get an official waiver for a course that I have tried four times to pass with the necessary grade, but kept falling short by just a few points even with tutoring and studying and reteaching and I just need to fill out the paperwork.

    Hopefully I can at least do the field experience/student teaching in the district that is in the town in which I reside (Something the college does not allow except in special circumstances). They will probably place me at the school I want, as I never attended there except for ESY.

    Getting outside my comfort zone is rather difficult. My former teacher was good at identifying that in me, so she slowly eased me into doing more and more tasks during my first field experience (which was pretty much supposed to be observing), even having me watch over the class of the teacher across the hall when that teacher was out of the room for a few minutes. It was a bit difficult for me, as I am rather... meek. My former teacher also said I need to work on projecting my voice, which I should probably work on with my therapist after I get more comfortable socially, perhaps I will be able to find a social skills group in my area for adults eventually.
     
  37. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,948
    Likes Received:
    2,096

    Jan 1, 2012

    You are fortunate to have a supportive, caring 'mentor', bros.:)

    What are your career goals? Do you want to be a class room teacher or small group? Special Ed? Something else?
     
  38. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jan 1, 2012

    I think a big part of student teaching success is realizing that you're a STUDENT.

    You're coming in, mid year, to a situation that has been surviving 4 months without you. There are routines and procedures in place. Some of them are the result of pretty intensive backstories that you don't have access to. Before you assume that what's happening is wrong, consider the possibility that there's a well thought out reason for what the teacher is doing.

    And realize that a real classroom is light years away from an education course... and that being "the teacher" is light years away from being "the student teacher." All that theory is great. But the problem is that the students you're dealing with haven't taken those education courses. So don't expect them to act or react the way you've been told they will.
     
  39. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Jan 2, 2012

    Classroom teacher, special ed. I am pursuing a degree in Teacher of Students with Disabilities K-5 (gets me a el. ed cert) with content area of history.
     
  40. rkirkwood

    rkirkwood New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 3, 2012

    I am in the process of doing some early field experience (volunteer) hours in preparation for applying to a credential program. I am not a ST, I am merely a volunteer/aide in a 2nd grade classroom. A few weeks prior to winter break, I noticed a few of the kids have sort of started to approach me as more of a friend--wanting to sit by me during story time, running over to give me a hug when I enter the classroom, talking to me at the beginning of recess, etc. What might be some tips to work on becoming more of an authority figure? My mentor teacher hasn't said anything at all; I am not sure she notices really. It makes me feel uncomfortable--I've always been a student who is quite timid in the classroom and respects authority completely. I am trying to think of polite ways to convey to these students that I feel uncomfortable by it because I feel it disrespects the teacher and is disruptive. Any tips on how I can convey that in a positive way?
     
  41. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    2,030
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jan 3, 2012

    Plans ready to be approved? Really, I never had to that.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Kelster95,
  2. nstructor,
  3. bella84,
  4. waterfall
Total: 480 (members: 6, guests: 451, robots: 23)
test