Community Supplies. Yes or no?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by i8myhomework, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. i8myhomework

    i8myhomework Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 24, 2013

    I wonder how everyone handles and feels about this. Last year we were instructed to do community supplies but the entire idea was a disaster. As soon as parents received the supplies list it was here go hell come.

    Of course the first day all the parents were asking "Why can't my Sally use her sparkly folders and My Little Pony pens?" ",Does my child really have to use crayons other kids have used?". Our P nixed the idea and said that next year the supplies list would be modified; of course there would be the standard required supplies but we added a pencil box and the option to purchase themed notebooks and folders and of course the community supply idea was abolished.

    This has been a blessing in disguise and going into the second year it has worked out wonderfully!:love: It has really inspired sharing amongst my students, like trading pretty pencils or folders. Borrowing has become successful as well. Every Friday I do a pencil box check and I give treats for those who have kept theirs tidy. So far everyone has succeeded and I never have to withhold prizes.

    I have been amazed how the lack of a community box had inspired so much... community heh. The kids love Fridays and impressing me by how clean they keep the entire room... not just the boxes. :blush:

    So those of you that teach lower elementary: how are you making it work? Community supplies? Individual boxes? Sharing or no sharing? Has it been successful?
     
  2.  
  3. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Oct 26, 2013

    Community supplies is extremely useful for me. I let the parents know on the supply letter which supplies will be for community use and which will be for personal use (they can bring in any folders and notebooks.)

    My kids have desks not tables. It makes it easier to pass things out, there's a bin of art supplies or scissors or highlighters for each tables. And dry erase markers when we need those. Everyone always has all the supplies we need. I don't have to worry about who misplaced their highlighter and needs to find someone to borrow one from.
     
  4. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 26, 2013

    I teach in an extremely low-income urban school, and at least half of my students do not bring any supplies, so, in my classroom, EVERYTHING is considered "community" supplies. That being said, each child has a desk, and I issue each student a pencil "bag" (purchased by guess who). In fact, when they enter on the first day, in addition to their name tag being on their desk, there is a stack: a laminated yellow "unfinished work" folder, a TIGER (Today I've Got Everything Ready) binder, the pencil bag, 2 pencils, and a box of crayons. Students keep "their" crayons. Glue, color pencils, sticky notes, etc., are located in each "table group's" supply basket (a table group consists of 4 desks zip-tied together into a "table"). Pencils (except for "personal" pencils) are community supplies, and I do all the sharpening in the afternoons. If I want my students to have something, especially if I want a specific color or quality/brand, I have found that it is much more effective/efficient/possible if I buy it myself. I know this is not the way it is everywhere, but it works for me in my current situation.
     
  5. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Oct 26, 2013

    I do some community supplies:
    -Glue
    -Glue sticks
    -Dry-erase markers
    -Pencils
    -Pink erasers

    All students have their own pencil box, which contains markers, scissors, colored pencils, and crayons. They also use their own binders, folders, and notebooks. There is such a huge difference in quality of these items, that I would never ask them to share (5 cent paper folders, versus $2 plastic folders, 99 cent binders that fall apart in a month, versus $6 binders, etc).

    My main reason for doing community supplies is that they last longer. Other teachers are always complaining about their students not having dry-erase markers or pencils, but I don't have any problems, and I never run out.
     
  6. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,150
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 27, 2013

    I prefer for everyone to have their own ''stuff'' because then arguments starts in my class (ie: ''I told him he could borrow my green and now i want it back and he's still using it!'')

    I do however have a ''lost'' box which is kind of like communal supplies. All day I find or am brought random crayons and pencils that have fallen on the floor and when i'd ask ''Who does this belong to?'' no one would claim it. It was really annoying. So now, I tell the kids ''if you find a school supply that isn't yours, just stick it in the lost box''.

    That way when we're coloring and someone needs a green, they check the lost box. I've surprisingly never had a kid complain ''that's my green in the lost box"! If they did I would probably say ''it was on the floor at the end of the day, so it belongs to the lost box now'' unless the child was really upset about it in which case i would say ''go get your crayon THIS time, but next time it's on the floor it stays in the box''
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 27, 2013

    We do community supplies for most things but these are clearly marked on the supply list and we ask for specific brands. Our parents are very supportive.
     
  8. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Oct 27, 2013

    My views on community supplies comes from my childhood. I grew up in a family that had very little, but my mom made sure we had new things for school, including new crayons. It broke my heart to have to watch other kids use the one new thing I got. So, I do very little in the way of community supplies. I keep their pencils and their loose leaf paper. I purchased bottles of glue (and a refill bottle and pump), scissors, a box of crayons, postits, manual pencil sharpeners, glue sticks, red pens, and highlighters with supply money. The kids keep everything else. We have colored pencils on the supply list, and they keep those. Everything else is in baskets at the end of their tables on shelves.
    This is how I started the year. (Later I found awesome pencil boxes at target for their pens, pencils, and highlighters. It sits in the middle of the table.)
    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ally06
Total: 200 (members: 3, guests: 183, robots: 14)
test