Community supplies- ok in my classroom, NOT OK with my own child, please help me with

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by Ponypal, Aug 11, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    Here is the key (in a nutshell?)
    If the school provides it, it becomes community supplies.
    If a parent provides it, it belongs to the student

    A teacher should ask for donations for the community supplies, not suprise the parent by saying they are community supplies after the student's parent have bought them.

    To quote and old saying we said from back in the 1960s


    In my college days I was a uninformed liberal hippie with long hair who attended Woodstock :cool: I have since come to my senses and renounced my foolish ways, also I never inhaled, really!:|
     
  2. hatima

    hatima Devotee

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,081
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 12, 2007

    Irishdave I agree, "If the school provides it, it becomes community supplies. If a parent provides it, it belongs to the student." Then asking for the parents to please buy whatever they could off a list to donate to the classroom use. That is a smart way to handle it. If my teachers would have done that maybe I wouldn't be so bitter over community supplies. My family was told, "you have to buy these community supplies."
     
  3. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    What it comes down to:

    This teacher has decided that this is how HER class will run.
     
  4. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    450

    Aug 12, 2007

    Ponypal,
    Thanks for your response--the way you described your classroom I don't normally think of as "community supplies" (ie drop in a bucket, etc.) When you talk to her teacher, try to think about how you would like a parent to address a similar issue with you. We've all had those run-ins with parents who don't like the way we run things in our classrooms--and all parents and teachers are entitled to their opinions and ways of doing things. I would think it would be professional to address her the way you would like to be addressed. Have you asked HOW she plans to manage the supplies? It might be similar to your room. Ultimately, I wouldn't let an issue of supplies ruin your relationship with the teacher--you have to work with her all year, and she has to work with you, it is a partnership. IMO, there are bigger fish to fry.
     
  5. monica

    monica Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    Messages:
    293
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    How did I just find this thread? LOVED reading it!! Loved finding a blog and reading it too! I have to let my husband in on this political educational thread, great discussion going on!

    I teach preschool, a far cry from where some of you are teaching I understand. Even at their age though, I think having their OWN things is teaching responsibility. As for the brands and cute factor, nothing in life is fair and equal .. come on.

    Reminds me of a teacher in our preschool who only plays games where everyone wins and there is never a "last" person or someone who looses. Are you kidding me? How are they ever going to learn to cope with such things? I digress.....

    I send a supply list with very detailed requests. (Crayola brand 8 pack of crayons, etc..) The traditional plastic pencil box is also on the list. I ask that the parents write their child's name on their things, but if they don't ... I do. (yes, each marker individually) It's amazing to watch how 4 & 5 year olds have already learned a sense of responsibility (or not) from day one with their things. (Thinking about little B. last year lining up her things just so in the box each time she opened it.)

    We also have community items that the parents supply from a wish list I have. I ask for extra of the needed items for our free art & writing center. There are buckets & tubs of items there for use during center time. THEIR things are for small group and work times, if they choose to use THEIR things during center time too that's fine by me. Parent's supply extra items like glue sticks and I give those to the children when they need new ones, again with their name on it. Oh.. I only get out glue bottles when we are using them for something, they don't stay in the children's boxes all the time. They do have the names on them though and community ones are available in the art center.

    If (when) someone doesn't take care of their things (Little W lost all his crayons and left the lids off the markers so that they didn't work by week two) they are able to (a)go to the art center and borrow, returning it when they are finished .. or .. (b)rely on a friend's generosity by borrowing theirs. (teachable moments all over the place) After the Christmas holidays (yep, I said Christmas not winter) and around Easter break (you read that right too) I do look through everyone's box of supplies and send a parent note asking for replacements for things if need be. The parent can supply again for the child who didn't take care of their things or not. Usually I only have one or two who need new things.

    That's what I do ~
     
  6. Mrs.A

    Mrs.A Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    Wow! What a hot topic-I never really thought deeply about this before. I am most amazed by the number of schools that don't provide basic supplies like paper, pencils, scissors and glue. I am lucky I guess because all the supplies are provided by the school and are all community supplies. If students bring in something special it either stays in their locker for use for a special activity (art projects, etc.) or pencils and crayons they can keep at their desk. They are totally responsible for their personal supplies. But back to the original question, I agree with agdamity-approach this teacher as you would like to be approached. Just state your concerns politely, without hidden messages that you disagree with her management as a teacher. I think most teachers will respond well to this kind of thing if it is phrased nicely-I know I would. The only other thing I would consider as a parent is whether this is going to cause more problems for my child. As a teacher I certainly would change the supply issue for your child if requested but I would not change my entire management of supplies for one parent, especially right before school started. Will the other students notice and single out your child because she's doing something different? As a parent that would concern me more than responsibility for supplies for one school year-you are obviously teaching her lifelong lessons in responsibility which will carry her much farther than one year in school. Good luck- parenting is such a joy but so hard sometimes!
     
  7. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    Does it? Just one parent can through legal action change it.

    To get ridiculous this is a tax, yes a tax, the teacher is an agent of the government (school board), and is imposing and collecting a tax.

    Taking from students to give to others? That is What it comes down to.
    It just does not seem right.

    Do you see what I mean?
     
  8. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    I know why this thread is so hot!!!

    it is in the wrong place
    We are in
    A to Z Teacher Stuff Forums > TeacherChat Forums > General Education
    It should be in
    A to Z Teacher Stuff Forums > TeacherChat Forums > Elementary Education

    Now that I have solved this problem I think I will tackle world peace. :angel:
    :toofunny: :rofl: :2up: :rofl: :toofunny:
     
  9. monica

    monica Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    Messages:
    293
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007


    That's the truth and not sure how I feel about that. After all, that's how they took quiet time for prayer in school away.

    Guess I digress again?!
     
  10. Ponypal

    Ponypal Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2007

    Isn't that the truth Irishdave?!

    I am not a complainer at the school, but this is an issue that I feel is importart to me as a parent.

    I'm an involved parent who attends school functions and has made donations and supported fundraisers. I am also a PTA member, have made contributions to a school board member when her home burned down, and have taken the time to get to know the principal.

    I have started a letter to give to her teacher. In it, I have only presented myself and my case in the most respectful and professional manner and I ask that my request be treated the same.
     
  11. Ponypal

    Ponypal Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2007

    Irishdave- I wanted to hear what educators in other levels and other subjects thought.

    I just burned my hand on the keyboard!
     
  12. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    Darn and I thought I had it solved so goes the world of diplomacy
    :( :| :) :lol: :toofunny:
     
  13. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    1,640
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 12, 2007

    The main thing I'm taking issue with here is the assumption that community supplies are not cared for. Come into my classroom. It is a classroom where everything is shared. You will not see smashed crayons and chewed-up pencils. You will see children caring for the supplies. It is taught. It is expected. That expectation is fulfilled.

    We do not do it for the sake of management convenience. (Although I think that is a perfectly legitimate reason to do it.) We do it so that the children learn to work together, share, and be responsible.

    (This response is not aimed at the OP. I just think this thread has headed in another direction entirely. Everything isn't a political agenda.)
     
  14. Ponypal

    Ponypal Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2007

    Irishdave- you still have my support on the world peace attempt
     
  15. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2006
    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 12, 2007

    PonyPal,
    For you and your daughter it is just an issue on responsibility. You have been working with your daughter on taking care of what's hers. That's something we all wish more parents did!:)

    But, what it really comes down to, your request--however professionally or well stated your it is to have your daughter opt out of the community supplies, will cause her to be the only one not "sharing".

    Now, knowing children the way I do, the rest of the class is going to look at your daughter and think, "It's not fair, why does she get to keep all her things?" or "She thinks she's really special because she doesn't have to share." or "She's mean, she won't share."
    Either way, your daughter will be singled out.

    I think you have to consider what is more important--teaching her to be responsible (which you can and already do in other ways) or letting your child be a part of a cohesive community. And just because things don't belong to us individually, doesn't mean we don't have to or want to take care of it.

    Last year I had community supplies and I stressed that things weren't 'yours' they were OURS. We were a class, a family and we shared and we took care of them. I only had one child chew pencils.

    This year I'm still undecided. This thread is helping though!!
     
  16. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2007

    What it WILL cost her is a smidgen of her authority. Your child will know that mommy stepped in and told the teacher that she didn't need to do what the rest of the class does, and that will diminish her authority a wee bit.

    I do not know you, and I do not know your daughter, so please don't take this as a judgement of you....but what this comes across to me as, being a total stranger and only reading your posts....is that your child is too good to use supplies that are, in your opinon, "sub-par." Only the best for her. Let those other kids whose parents don't care enough to buy the most expensive supplies use pencils THOSE pencils, but not your child. This may not be at all the way you mean to come across, but be careful in how you approach your daughter's teacher, because surely this isn't the image you hope to portray.

    Personally, as a teacher, I don't view the parents as the consumer. I certainly don't bend over backwards to make them happy. I'm there for the kids, not the parents. If a parent disagrees with my policies, I'm happy to listen to them and explain why I do what I do, but I don't change to suit them, and I very, very rarely allow them to deviate from the policies (left-handed scissors, yes, I would let the child have her own pair kept in her desk. That's a different issue). If parent could change the policies to suit them, you'd end up with 10 different policies on each issue, and in the end, you'd end up with very little control over the classroom and its' organization.

    Kim
     
  17. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2007

    Are pencils and crayons really worth legal action? God, our country is sue-happy enough as it is without bringing it down to this level.
    Kim
     
  18. born2teach84

    born2teach84 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    At first I couldn't understand why you didn't want her to share supplies. Then as I read I understood.

    If you are looking at the responsibility issue then look at it this way. The things she does have, books, notebooks, her scissors (which I think the teacher would let her keep), bookbag, folders and work she completes would be enough items to allow her to learn responsibility. I think pencils, glue, crayons, and such should be allowed as community because along with responsibility we also teach sharing. I think your daughter can learn responsibility with having community supplies, and you know the best part could be that she teaches the others around her to be responsible because she tells them all the great things you have taught her. JMO
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2007
  19. apple25

    apple25 Comrade

    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    As a junior high teacher, this is a very interesting thread to read. I never realized how much thought goes into organizing an elementary classroom . . . and it has me realize that I need to give some time at the start of September for everyone to label their supplies (grade 7/8). Boy - was cross last year when I went to give a geometry test and half the students didn't have protractors!!! They expected to be able to borrow from others, or better yet - that I photocopy some of overhead sheets (what last year's teacher did . . . good idea, but it didn't go over too well with me as I had listed it on the supply list for Sept!!).

    The one thing I would like to ask community teachers, what do you do about the kid that has warts all over their hands? Or, for the kid that doesn't wash their hands after using the bathroom (and I know kids that had a problem re: #1 and 2's - very gross, but unfortunately true).

    In my school it is a scent free policy, so strong smells - like the ones from hand santitizer - aren't appreciated. . . though I will confess, I broke down and brought some in (after constantly catching the cold week after week after week!).
     
  20. MrsLilHen

    MrsLilHen Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    This has really turned into a great debate! It's so interesting to read everyone's take on this.
     
  21. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    No, I don't see what you mean. The teacher is not TAKING from some students to give to others. She is requesting the same materials from ALL students in order to create a set of community supplies. It's Ponypal's choice to buy extra-special materials and request extra-special consideration for her child.
     
  22. IRAEnglishT-chr

    IRAEnglishT-chr Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    IMHO, I don't think you can get around it without sounding selfish and/or petty.

    I have a friend who teaches first grade and purchased everything her class will need for the upcoming year. She puts the exact same items in their boxes, which are numbered, as are the supplies. That way the kids don't have to worry about someone else leaving their glue open to dry or breaking their crayons, but everyone has the same stuff. If someone brings in a frilly feathered pencil, she allows them to show it to the class and tell where they got it, etc., and then asks them to please put it back in their backpack to use at home and sends a short note nicely reiterating her policy to the parents again.

    I say let your daughter learn a bigger lesson from it. She sounds smart to me. I think she'll be fine.
     
  23. jl2teach

    jl2teach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    The one thing I would like to ask community teachers, what do you do about the kid that has warts all over their hands? Or, for the kid that doesn't wash their hands after using the bathroom (and I know kids that had a problem re: #1 and 2's - very gross, but unfortunately true) This is a quote from a previous poster.

    Should we not allow those students to use the computers that others use or read books from our classroom libraries, etc.,etc.? Kids use things in classrooms constantly that others have touched - if you find that so repulsive - Home School!! School is one of the first social settings where children learn social skills without parents around. Sharing supplies gives them many opportunities for learning how to get along with others who may not have the same respect for material things as they do. They learn to adjust.
     
  24. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    Schools should also have sound exclusion policies in place. Check out this book from the AAP:

    PRODUCT SUMMARY
    NEW!

    Managing Infectious Diseases in Child Care and Schools:
    A Quick Reference Guide

    Edited by Susan S. Aronson, MD, FAAP, AAP, and Timothy R. Shope, MD, MPH, FAAP

    Incorporating content from the AAP 2003 Red Book® and color images from the Visual Red Book on CD-ROM, this new guide helps out-of-home caregivers prevent, identify, and respond to the most common childhood infectious diseases. Written in concise, nontechnical language and spiral-bound for easy use, the guide provides a valuable new tool to help caregivers handle child illness and communicate with health care professionals.

    The medical information is presented in an easy-to-understand style and tone. This new publication is meant to be a "bridge" publication that will allow pediatricians and child care workers to "speak the same language" and enrich the field of child care beyond the tools currently available.

    Puts critical child health information at your fingertips for fast, on-the-spot reference.

    Infection control measures
    Health promotion and hygiene
    Sanitation, disinfection, and maintenance
    Hand washing
    Diaper changing
    Signs and symptoms of the ill child
    Inclusion and exclusion criteria
    Caregiver health
    Situations requiring immediate medical attention
    And more
    Softcover, Spiral-bound, 2004 - approx 120 pages


    Seriously, warts aren't contagious. For everything else, there's soap & water, and judicious use of Lysol or bleach spray. Teachers who don't ensure that children properly wash their hands aren't really doing their jobs.

    Being exposed to germs actually HELPS build up a healthy immune system. Of course, I'm coming from the perspective of working with 0-3s, so I have children who mouth, suck, lick, chew (and sometimes get vomit, urine, and feces) on everything... it's all one big happy community! :hugs:
     
  25. kiraj

    kiraj Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    If this were an older class, I could understand. However for kindergarten I think community supplies is reasonable. Sharing and working together is certainly a skill appropriate for an elementary classroom. Learning to take care of community supplies is an important lesson too.
     
  26. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    Let me please get down to the REAL issue
    ----Communication !-----
    The teacher did not Communicate to the parents back in June that it would be Community supplies as stated in the "welcome" letter in August. That is the real problem I am sure that the OP would have bought Community supplies without duress. The teacher has changed the rules, switched horses in mid stream, made an unleveled playing field etc.

    Now back to solving world peace.
    :toofunny: :rofl: :2up: :rofl: :toofunny:
     
  27. born2teach84

    born2teach84 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    I don't send out the supply list and it goes out in a generic letter so this year my parents wont know they are community till they get to open house. I guess she could have sent the letter earlier but in our school we don't get the class list till the week before school. The entire third grade gets their supply list in mid July and its all the same. So I don't know if it was possible to have better communication.
     
  28. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    I don't see how it's "switching horses in mid-stream" since school hasn't even started yet.
     
  29. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    450

    Aug 12, 2007

    There's no way of knowing if the teacher changed her mind. Supplies are supplies. Just because the list didn't say they would be community supplies doesn't change what the teacher put on the list. While it would have been nice to know in June, it doesn't change WHAT needs to be bought. From my understanding, and I could be wrong, the OP is not concerned about the cost of supplies, but teaching her daughter responsibility. Knowing the supplies would be community earlier wouldn't have changed the issue of responsibility.
     
  30. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    Absolutely! As an adult in the workplace, I also have to use community supplies, and it helps when we all treat them as our own: pens, computers, shared equipment, the teacher's lounge...
     
  31. srh

    srh Devotee

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    1,199
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    Sevenplus: I like the way you explained the issue of responsibility with community supplies. It's the same in my classroom. I had better not see students misusing or tearing up anything that belongs to our classroom! That was part of what I meant in my rant where I said that using community supplies is in itself a GREAT lesson in responsibility! But I'll go a step further and say that we tried individual pencil boxes first and THEN community tubs. We stuck with the tubs because it IS much less time-consuming and easier (yes, even more convenient) for maintenance purposes. I feel there is nothing wrong at all with doing something for the purpose of convenience--that extends into MORE TIME FOR MORE IMPORTANT THINGS!!
     
  32. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007


    Amen to that! Although I think it is interesting to hear MS & HS teachers' perspectives on this situation, it is also somewhat irrelevant, because the classroom management issues are totally different. Anything that makes an ECED or ELED classroom run more smoothly and allows for more instructional time is great. I don't think that MS & HS teachers understand how much of our days are spent on routine tasks (lining up, going potty, washing hands, eating snack, walking to specials, getting materials, packing up, etc.... they're not only doing it, but they're learning HOW to do it). I'd say half of every day is spent on routines & transitions... anything that came make that go more quickly & more smoothly is immensely valuable.
     
  33. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    The supply list should say "this is for community supplies."

    Sharing is still a concept that I think is over rated.:eek:

    I have to take pills during the day when I get a bottle of water to wash my pills down I have students asking for a bottle of water and telling me "Sharing is caring"
    We have a teacher who is diabetic, to stabilize his blood sugar he has to eat something mid morning, again the students ask him to share whatever he is eating and telling him "Sharing is caring"
    Both of us try to do this between classes but at times we just can't. The Kids are serious when they ask and they expect to get it.

    The "expecting it" mentality (entitlement) is what I think most of us on the "no community supplies Side" are complaining about.

    In our country we have a generation that feel they have entitlement to everything
    I had to work for everything I ever had, any scolorship I earned, I worked summers, my father earned and saved for my and my sister's education it was not handed to my family.

    (hmmm NCLB is that an entitlement? stop that Dave that is another thread )

     
  34. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    Hmmmm routine tasks (Unpacking for the start of class, going to the restroom, getting a drink, setting up grouping, getting materials out, packing up, etc. they're not only doing it, but they're relearning HOW to do it). I don't see much deference except we do it in 55 min 5 to 6 times a day. the lower grades do it all day long. We both (the pro and con groups of "community supplies") need to understand what the other group does
     
  35. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,630
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    I think teaching responsibility for ones own possessions is as important in kindergarten as it is in high school. To me, the only thing community supplies teaches is that resources are unlimited, a bottomless pit if you will. That isn't the case in real life, so why should we expect it in the classroom?
    I don't like the idea of community supplies. If everything belongs to everyone, then nothing belongs to anyone.
     
  36. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    Messages:
    2,042
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2007

    IrishDave:
    Let me please get down to the REAL issue
    ----Communication !-----
    The teacher did not Communicate to the parents back in June that it would be Community supplies as stated in the "welcome" letter in August. That is the real problem I am sure that the OP would have bought Community supplies without duress. The teacher has changed the rules, switched horses in mid stream, made an unleveled playing field etc.


    June and August have NOTHING to do with it! Some schools (like mine) do not give out class lists until the end of the summer. I usually do not get my list until the last week in August!
    This teacher has communiacted, she has made up her mind.
     
  37. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,630
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2007

    Perhaps the supply list that gets sent out should clearly state that all supplies the children bring will be part of a community supply bucket. That would solve a lot of the issues right there.
     
  38. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    To an organized parent this is "switching horses in mid-stream"
    My wife watches the clearance sales and buys all summer long, she buys the kids' school supplies during the school year for next year! she is organized while I am just ADD :toofunny:
     
  39. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 12, 2007

    BINGO I gotta fever and the only prescription is more cowbell!
     
  40. Ponypal

    Ponypal Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2007

    So many posters think that I bought some hoity-toity school supplies. (I don't have Hello Kitty pencils) I bought the basic supplies that "are tried and true" as I have been a teacher for years. I know what materials work and which one's are not so great. How many of you parents out there receive a list with a specific brand name for supplies? These brands are specified for a reason. There wasn't a brand name specified on our list, except Expo, so I chose the brands that would work for my daughter. I want my left handed daughter to be able to have quality pencils that sharpen and write smoothly every time. D'nelian handwriting can be difficult and she has been working on improving this skill for the past 2 years. Cheaper pencils are frustrating! Don't we all have a favorite pen or something that we feel comfortable using? She will be in second grade, she has a proven reputation of being a caring, kind, girl. Sharing is not an issue. My parents didn't go above and beyond for me, they didn't know how. That's what makes me upset. I am pushing the responsibilty issue, because I am a parent who regards individual responsibility as important.

    In my years of teaching, I have never taken the supplies that students came with.

    How many teachers out there are willing, on the first day of school, to turn over your pens, gradebook, post it's, stapler, tape, and calculator? Then when you need these items, you can go through a box and pick out something. Some will not work. Some will be rusty. Some will be too small...

    Some people were not responsible with their things, so now you get the broken stapler.

    I don't have a problem CONTRIBUTING, which I will do. Just don't take something from my child that we picked out SPECIALLY FOR HER for the reasons that I have stated.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 137 (members: 0, guests: 120, robots: 17)
test