Common Core

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Tired Teacher, Aug 31, 2019.

  1. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    The state has required instructional minutes for each content area. Our school day is already 7.25 hours long, not counting the time added on to teachers' contracted time. If we made lunch longer, the school day would have to get longer. No one wants that.
     
  2. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    On average, in the three elementary schools I attended, recess was 20 minutes (usually toward the morning) and lunch was 40 minutes long.

    I’m so confused why your students and you are getting shorted. That seems so wrong to me. They need time to socialize and you need time off away from students. In CA, it is written into state law that teachers are to be given at least a duty-free 30-minute lunch each day and that is student-free. Wow.
     
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  3. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Cohort

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    OK This made me laugh too. :) My son was a straight A student until he got to 7th grade and discovered girls. Looking back, I was not the most patient parent at that time. I used to say, " We'll have dinner when you are done with your homework." We'd have some late dinners at times. Boys like to eat at that age though and it was quite effective. I told someone about this a couple of yrs ago, and they were appalled that I could be that mean. I did not see it as mean and still don't. He never missed a meal. He just had to getter done. :) He grew up to be highly successful in many ways and I am not lying. He has a mother in law apartment in his house set up for me if I ever need it. His wife is cool with it and we get along well. I plan on staying in my own house as long as possible, but it is good to know I have back up if needed.
     
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  4. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Cohort

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    Most schools I know of have a 30 minute lunch and 30 minute recess back to back.
     
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  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Teachers do have a 30-minute duty-free lunch. The students have lunch and recess back-to-back for a total of 40 minutes. So, we teachers actually end up with a 40-minute duty-free lunch by default, even though we are only required to have 30 minutes.

    It's the kids who only have 20 minutes to eat and 20 minutes to play. Honestly, most kids can finish their meal in 20 minutes anyway. Any longer, they'd get restless in the cafeteria. That's why they get sent to recess. Older kids can handle sitting still for longer, which is, I assume, why middle and high school kids get longer to eat and no time to play.

    In my district (and in a few others in the area), we can give a 10-20 minute brain break or extra recess that is supervised by the classroom teacher for the youngest students (K-2). It's not a duty-free recess, but it's our prerogative to allow for it, if we think our kids need it. Older students (3+) don't get that same break. Everyone, though, gets the 40 minute lunch/recess (20 minutes each).
     
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  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Right, this seems more in line with what I’ve experienced.
     
  7. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Oh! This makes much more sense. Thank you for clarifying.
     
  8. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Cohort

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    Bella, This is very true. It is especially true if you have kids with behavior problems or kids who are unable to work independently for more than 2 minutes. Meth hit our area way later than it did in the lower states. I think we are seeing effects of that more too.
     
  9. Pisces

    Pisces Rookie

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    In my subject area, the standards we use are NGSS (instead of common core.) Same idea applies. I like NGSS and while I work at a private school that doesn't use those standards, I've taken the standards we created and use, and aligned them to NGSS.
     
  10. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    My state has taken both the CCSS and the NGSS and created our own standards that are on par with them but unique to our state.
     
  11. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Oh, please elaborate! :)
     
  12. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Meth, as in methamphetamines?!
     
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  13. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Basically, my state had adopted CCSS in 2010 but called them Missouri Learning Standards. There was enough opposition to CCSS a few years later that my state passed a law requiring that new standards be created. Because educators knew that the CCSS had moved us in the right direction, new standards were created that aligned to CCSS. There were some changes, as far as some standards being moved from one grade level to another and some standards that were missing from CCSS altogether were added in. Generally, though, they are on par as far as leading to students being "college- and career-ready". In my opinion, I think they are better than CCSS because they are more specific, better-defined, and include some important skills and concepts that had been left out of CCSS.

    Here are crosswalks showing how the old standards align to the new standards:
    K-5 ELA example: https://dese.mo.gov/sites/default/files/cur-mls-crosswalk-ela-K-5.pdf
    Grade 3 Math example: https://dese.mo.gov/sites/default/files/cur-mls-crosswalk-ma-gr3.pdf
    Link to all standards: https://dese.mo.gov/college-career-...-learning-standards#mini-panel-mls-standards2

    My state had not updated the science standards since 2008. With the adoption of NGSS around the country, my state knew that we needed more robust science standards. However, knowing how it went with CCSS, apparently they knew that that the new standards would only be accepted if they were uniquely created for our state. So, again, new standards were developed to be in alignment with NGSS. Again, there were some adjustments where standards were moved from one grade level to another or where an additional standard was added in to our standards that didn't exist in NGSS, but they are ultimately on par with NGSS, being based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education.

    Here is the crosswalk from our old standards to our new standards:
    K-5 Science: https://dese.mo.gov/college-career-...-learning-standards#mini-panel-mls-standards2

    Standards in all other content areas are also being updated to be more robust than in the past. In some content areas, new standards being developed, as standards for those content areas never existed. For example, we now have standards for Computer Science and Dance!?! Don't ask me where we are supposed to find time in the day for that instruction or who is responsible for teaching it.
     
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  14. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    The Missouri standards, to me, seem better than the CCSS! I how like the math standards, in particular, are more specific.
     
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  15. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Agreed!
     
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  16. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    I’m in middle school, and our lunch is 20 minutes.
     
  17. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    This really upsets me. I’m sick of teachers hardly ever being given breaks.

    At my school, we have a 50-minute lunch every day except on short days, which is 40 minutes. It’s not fair to you to have so little time to relax and eat. I love my lunch breaks because I can tutor students who need the help or just sit back in my office chair and take a nap if I want or watch Netflix, lol!
     
  18. Tired Teacher

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    Futuremath prof, Yep! It reached its way into this corner of the world for some. It is so sad to see what it does to people ( parents) who started out not on it. Then you see them progress in the addiction. It is very obvious by looking at them. They go from decent parents to a wreck in a really short time. A few of them have already lost custody of their kids because they get in some trouble w/ the law. It is a handful only, but we had a mom die fairly recently from heroin even.
     
  19. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Companion

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    I've used algebra tiles for years and find the visual/concrete nature enhances and deepens learning for all my students, from sped to advanced. They can be used for so many concepts; one of my favorites is using them for factoring quadratics and completing the square.
     
  20. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    I am looking forward to using them for binomial multiplication, factoring, and completing the square. A couple questions about your experiences:

    1) How much front-loading did you have to do in order to teach what the tiles represent and how they work?

    2) How smooth is the transition for students between using the tiles for conceptual understanding and being able to apply that understanding to strictly paper and pencil work?
     
  21. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    It's been a while since you attended elementary school. Since the advent of standardized testing, many schools have dropped recess all together and just have a 20 minute lunch period, then back to work. Also, some schools are so regimented that there is little time to try to add more small group/one on one instruction time.
    Teachers would love to have the opportunities that you have tutoring for all their students.
     
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  22. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I’m 27 and attended elementary school from August of 1996 to the summer of 2002. I’m pretty sure I had standardized testing every year since kindergarten.
     
  23. Tired Teacher

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    Swan, I am shocked your school and others took away recess! That is awful! What's next? Christmas? I should not joke because they are trying to take away a lot of holidays out of the schools nowadays. We are required at our school to have a certain number of minutes a day for the kids to have physical activity. I thought that was a federal thing. Maybe it is just a state rule.
     
  24. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    We have had a 20 minute lunch my entire career. I student taught in a different district, and at high school. Lunch was about 30, but that is because they had a five minute passing time on either side.

    I attended elementary school in the 70’s, and we didn’t have recess. No playground.
     
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  25. Tired Teacher

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    Back when the earth was cooling and dinosaurs roamed the earth freely, we had 3 recess times per day. One before school, 1 after lunch, and 1 mid afternoon.
    In between times there was zero goofing off. You paid attention and worked. Parents, teachers, and admin expected kids to work and learn.
    I only remember 1x a boy in 2nd grade did something, I can't remember what even, that set the nicest teacher off of the deep end. Then I remember a lot more in JR High, but they let us play in elementary, but expected us to work too.
    Due to technology, I don't know if most kids today could handle the work load we had then.
     
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  26. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Random thoughts from reading the thread:

    I have little complaint with Common Core. The standards seem reasonable enough.

    I do have complaints with the intense testing. I find it unreasonable and too often any meaningful results get left by the wayside. It's not that I don't love a good test, just that I think some powers that be have gotten caught up in a bit much.

    I'm disappointed/jealous by different accounts of recess and lunch. At my school, we have a 30 minute lunch break. As far as teacher contract goes, it's our duty-free 30 minutes promised. However, as far as the kids go, it's 30 minutes to both eat and play. We are given two other recess breaks, 10 minutes each. It's... disappointing. Funnily enough, it's better than it was last year. It changed this year due to adherence to the teacher contract, promising along with the lunch break 2 10-minute breaks. Last year, they skipped out on the afternoon break. If you wanted recess for your kids you had to take them out. Which on its own was fine, but I prefer adherence to the teacher contract/actually allowing the kids an official break. I know it's better than some get, but in my experience it's low to other schools I've been at. That said, our school day seems to be ever so shorter than others in the vicinity so, maybe it works out?

    We have something of a different schedule this year and I'm still not sure what to make of it. Perhaps once it gets going I will give a stronger opinion. Anywho, the district changed its content time requirements so people turned it into a schedule and, yikes, there is no time for anything. I mean, yes, we got in everything the district wanted, but there's not many minutes to spare. And a lot of people aren't happy. However, a bright side is some very focused, organized small group time. I personally like that.
     
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  27. Tired Teacher

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    Our schedules are like yikes now too. We have zero transition time. At the time the kids are lining up for recess outside, we are officially starting science. Anyone who looked at that could see it is unrealistic, but a few of us have tried to change it to no avail.
     
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  28. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Kind of sums up Common Core, but applicable to other standards as well. Most schools see the testing as the all important numerical proof that what they are doing is working (or not). The fact that testing is pushed by Pearson, created by Pearson, and the money is paid to Pearson has always bothered me. And before I get slammed by someone who loves Pearson, let me go on record as someone who LOVES many Pearson texts - I think they are awesome, well written, and very relevant. I could teach my subject matter, however, and test for understanding without a major standardized test for every major subject, taking a massive number of days to administer. But that is another thread, yet to be started.
     
  29. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    My last school, we would do those dreaded data dives. Eventually, someone asked what we were planning to do with it... Fortunately, that question did lead to administration coming up with some real plans other than reading data.

    I actually love data. But appropriate, restrained, useful data.
     
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  30. Tired Teacher

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    I already have 1 thing to be thankful for next week. Our school, principals, teachers, and state- wide view is pretty much that high stakes, standardized testing is a bunch of garbage. We have zero pressure put on us when it comes to state testing. ( Other than to get it done and out of the way...)
     
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  31. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    This is the way my district views it too.
     
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  32. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Companion

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    It doesn't take much frontloading for what you want to do. They basically have to understand how area vs perimeter of the tiles works. I spend a day or two max on this. Then I spend 2-3 days on having students try and build rectangles out of various quadratic expressions and vice versa. I then teach factoring using the box and diamond method. My students always rock this on the district tests, so I'm guessing it works well, lol.

    I teach completing the square after the above. I have them actually complete squares using the algebra tiles for a day or so. Then they have the why behind the process. From there, they transition to completely abstract moves fairly smoothly. They must build and write algebraically at the same time as they investigate. It helps make that connection in the brain before moving to completely abstract.

    I use lessons from the CPM Algebra I Common Core curriculum I used to teach. I'm sure there are other similar lessons online.
     
  33. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Cohort

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    WE are both very fortunate. I have been on the other side of things in TX, but was blessed that my kids always seemed to test pretty well. Except 1 yr....lmbo! I accidently taught a gifted class how to write a descriptive essay with way too much detail. ( Not enough focus on the main idea.) Everyone including myself was horrified at the scores. It is so nice to be where people do not get upset about tests.
     
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