Common Core Math planning... ack! so sorry - long

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by pwhatley, Aug 25, 2012.

  1. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 25, 2012

    I'm completely overwhelmed. I'm soo good at stuff, that I've already completely designed the template that most of my district is adopting for use - it's an MS word template with drop down menus for all the standards. Got that done in late July. Now I just have to write my first plan without a book to go by. The first two weeks were easy - they were just a review of K stuff. Now we're supposed to get into extending the counting sequence - counting to 120. I know this should be easy, but I'm drawing a complete blank. Other than counting over and over again, by 1s, 5s, & 10s, what am I supposed to do??? Some of my kiddos are great - already counting, if not to 100, then close. Others can't count to 10. They can't sit completing blank 120 charts for an hour & a half. We do our Daily straw count and days in school count - that's part of our calendar math routine. According to our pacing guide, I'm supposed to spend 3 weeks on the following guiding questions:


    1. Can students count in sequence to 120 starting at any number less than 120?
    2. Can students count by 5s and 10s?
    3. Can students read and write numerals in the range of 1-120?
    4. Can students represent a number of objects with a written numeral?
    5. Can students explain a number in terms of groups of ten and ones?
    6. Can students make groups of tens to count larger sets of objects?


    We are given very few "suggested" activities that aren't part of our calendar math routine. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Other than that, thanks for letting me vent, and pray for me!
     
  2.  
  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Aug 25, 2012

    So NOT my area of expertise!!!

    1. Can you play a game? Maybe a takeoff on musical chairs. One kid counts until the music stops ( or the timer goes off; I'm making this up as I type.) When he's forced to stop, you write down the number he ended with. The next kid has to pick it up from that number.

    2. Can you do beads on a necklace, using the factor in question as the number of beads in the pattern? So have a pattern of 5 beads (red, red, white, blue, blue) and have the kids count the number of beads, then go back by the number of cycles of 5 they have. This will probably be easier if you give them some sort of clip to mark off which bead they're up to.

    Likewise, for patterns of 5, you can talk about the number of school days. Show them that 5 days is one school week, 10 is 2, and so on. You can play the game of What day of the week will it be in 80 school days?
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 25, 2012

    You could make it part of their morning work to fill in the missing numbers in a sequence of 10-30 numbers anywhere from 0-120.

    Maybe have them use a deck of cards to make numbers. You could take out the 10, J, Q, K and have the students use the numbers to make different two digit and three digit numbers. Then they could start counting (or try to give the next 10 numbers) from the number that they made.

    Maybe have different families make an object collection of a variety of objects. Students could estimate how many are in the collection and then count the objects one day. This could be something a different family does each week.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 25, 2012

    Just finished my first (non-back-to-school/K review) week's plan, plus printing all the stuff to go with it, including things for small group rotations. I have a sub for two days next week because I'll be at a class, so that added to it. Now I'm just waiting for my poor, overworked little laminator to warm up so I can run about 3" of lamination through, lol. Thanks for the good thoughts!

    Oh, and thanks for the ideas... I usually don't blank out like this - it's just so much being thrown at us all at once, without backup. Who ever said teaching was boring never taught a single lesson, lol!
     
  6. jenneke607

    jenneke607 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 25, 2012

    Wow -- sounds like they are giving you a lot of freedom!

    It also sounds like you have a wide range of abilities to deal with, too. You may want to do some guided groups. Are the kids that are struggling to count to 10 demonstrating one-to-one correspondence? For those kids, you may want to use lots of number lines and also some Kathy Richardson activities, if you have those books available. For example, I have had really struggling learners make her animal designs out of unifix cubes -- you could just have kids make up designs -- and then place the unifix cubes on a number line to count them. They can also do simple things like 'grab and count,' where they grab a handful of cubes and then write the numeral to represent their total on a little hand. If they truly can't count to 10, though, they'll need lots of support. I usually ask lots of questions about +1/-1. ("Your design had 8 cubes. What if we added one more?")

    Check out the "giant number line" video on this site: http://www.smartfirstgraders.com/number-sense-activities.html
    (haha, turn down the sound first. That's... quite a theme song.)
    There is so much you can do with physical number lines. I like that the lights are catchy and also evenly spaced. I also like how the teacher incorporated benchmark numbers, and using number relationships (e.g. if 17 is orange, what color will 19 be? Where do we think 32 is?). This doesn't fit the standard precisely, but it's important.

    I know a K teacher that has her class keep track of how many fruits and vegetables the class collectively eats that day using tally marks. They start by drawing tally by tally (Morgan ate 2: an apple and some grapes; Sophia ate 1 banana; Leo ate 3: carrots, raisins and apple slices...) and then they count by 5s. Every day, they compared the numbers to see if they were eating more fruits and vegetables.

    You could do the same thing with 10 frames. I use them a lot when I'm trying to build kids to place value/understanding numbers as 10s and 1s.

    I like using Kathy Richardson's shape puzzles for students that need to work on numbers below 20 -- sounds like you have a few of those. She has some puzzles that students 'cover' with unifix cubes to measure the area, and then I have them write the area and also place them in order on a self-generated number line. You could do that with anything to compare, including larger structures. I've done similar things with 1st graders where we make an outline of a shape with string -- any shape they want -- and then see how many centimeter cubes/base 10 blocks or larger unifix cubes can fit. They could write their numbers and then compare.

    Counting collections of objects.

    This is a big one, and really may require a lot of instruction for some of the kids! I tend to use a lot of 10 frames and hundreds charts for this.

    There is a great book out about 10 frames (It Makes Sense: Using 10 Frames to Build Number Sense, by Melissa Conklin), and now a sequel about the using the hundreds chart. You can look at some sample pages via Amazon. The sample is about subitizing (looking for smaller groups of numbers to determine a larger quantity mentally, e.g. seeing a group of 8 as a group of 4 and another group of 4). You can also play games where students have to create the number out of 10 frames and some extras, or you make a number using a bunch of 10 frames (e.g. 5 full frames and a frame that has only 3 in it, for 53), and the students can write the number on a white board.

    This can be done with some more authentic counting activities -- some investigation that's more interesting and meaningful to them than just "count the arbitrary manipulative." (There must be something in the classroom or school the kids are curious about!) I usually start with just asking the kid to count a huge group, and they get overwhelmed. Then I show them how I can form groups of 10 to keep us more accurate, without changing the total. You may want to see if you can find the book How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin? at the library.

    Lastly, you may want to look into Chris Confer's book Teaching Number Sense in Grade 1.
     
  7. jenneke607

    jenneke607 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 25, 2012

    Sounds like you've been really busy and productive, pwhatley! I find I often draw a blank when given something that is extremely open-ended, too.

    You can also check sites like Teachers-Pay-Teachers. Donna, the owner of Math Coach's Corner, has created a few things that may suit your needs. (for example, these workstations)
     
  8. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 25, 2012

    Thanks, jenneke607 - I just put the first 2 Kathy Richardson books on my wishlist at amazon - I have to wait till I get paid again, lol. Re: teacherspayteachers - I'm there all the time - I love Donna Boucher's work! I think it's mostly that I'm not a numbers person. That, and the other changes that are being thrown at us with little or no support. I don't often get flummoxed like that, but when I do, it hurts!
     
  9. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,150
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2012

    Unfortunately I am not an expert in CC, but I just wanted to give you a :hugs: and let you know you're not alone. We adopted common core for math this year and it's been an uphill battle.

    Sometimes I feel totally lost and I find myself teaching the "old way" (I Do, We Do, You Do) and I get so scared someone is going to come in and I'll be written up or put on that oh so exclusive "sh-- list" where I have to start emailing my lesson plans into the P every week, constantly having her in my classroom and other micromanaging gem.

    ARGH! I am making this about me. Sorry!
     
  10. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sep 2, 2012

    We call the I Do, We Do, You Do, "To, With, By"- what's wrong with using that with common core?
     
  11. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Sep 2, 2012

    I still follow this set-up for my lessons too--I haven't heard anything about that not being compatible with the common core standards. What I'm teaching its different, but not necessarily the way I'm delivering it.
     
  12. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 2, 2012

    I still do "I do, We do, You do" as well. Our P hasn't said anything against it.
     
  13. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,150
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2012


    Each state is different I guess. During our (uninformative) Common Core math training we were told that there should be no more "I Do" that the kids should be running the lesson, not the teacher modelling.

    That it should be mainly "You(the student) do" with teacher support and coaching, as well as asking assessing and advancing questions. But no more demonstrating how to solve a problem.

    Instead we introduce the new concept and have the kids solve it and explain to the class how they figured it out, then we let the students practice different strategies.

    That works great for my advanced kids, but those like little Susie who have developmental delays or just don't catch on as quickly are often lost, so I pull small math groups and teach the old way...showing the kids how to solve a sample problem, then working together to solve a few problems, then having them do it independently or with a buddy.

    I hope I am explaining that right. It's all been very confusing and no one seems to have a clear idea what CC should LOOK like, including our math specialist, who didn't attend the trainings and cuts us off and changes the topic whenever we appeal to her for help during our collaborative planning meetings.

    The teachers who ran our training were a Pre-K teacher and a 5th grade teacher, neither of whom seemed that knowledgable about CC. Most of our questions were put on a parking lot with a promise they'd be answered later. They never were:mad:

    Edit: I don't mean to sound bitter, but at my school, I have found that when the county and/or state introduce new policies or curriculums, they throw it on the teachers and no one wants to really explain/teach it to us because if they do it wrong resulting in us teachers doing it wrong, then THEY take the blame.

    So instead of us learning w/the P, VP and math specialist, it goes like this: "We're doing Common Core. Go to a training and read the books and figure it out. No, i don't know anything about it. No I can't answer your questions."

    *three months later, we're called into a meeting*

    FIRST GRADE YOU'RE DOING A TERRIBLE JOB TEACHING COMMON CORE! THE TEST SCORES ARE LOW BECAUSE YOU DID SUCH A BAD JOB! WHY DIDN'T YOU GIVE OUT THIS ASSESSMENT? WHY DIDN'T YOU CHART THAT RESULT? THE STUDENTS ARE SUFFERING BECAUSE OF ALL OF YOU! HOW WILL THEY BE READY FOR THE MSA IN 3RD GRADE? YOU HAVEN'T BUILT A GOOD FOUNDATION FOR THEM
     
  14. jenneke607

    jenneke607 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2012

    Yikes, Em Catz -- your training sounds like a mess!

    It sounds like you're in Maryland if you do the MSA. Maryland published the following:

    Instructional Strategies for Common Core Math, K-8

    If you look at the page on What to Look for in a Mathematics Classroom, I don't think it 'forbids' direct instruction. In fact, it says that a variety of instruction should be used -- that might be one strategy you use, but it should not be the only one.

    It sounds like your district is asking you to change a lot without filling in the details! I would say it's better to focus on a small change. Maybe you want to figure out ways to promote the mathematical practice standards, even within the framework of direct instruction. Often (but not always) with direct instruction, these processes are lost or buried. How can you bring out student reasoning? How can you encourage students to justify their thinking and make mathematical connections? How can you lead students to efficient strategies? (Not all strategies are equal!)

    You can also check out this site on the Common Core, also done by a county in Maryland. Do not explore this all at once!! But as you go through, you can check it out standard by standard. For example, on the page about assessing the first standard (1.N.1, count to 120), it lists some common misconceptions. Sometimes I plan instruction based on what misconceptions might exist or arise. It also lists some possible extension and intervention (varying quality, as always) for your small groups. Don't feel like you need to lose your guided math groups! You worked hard to come up with a structure that works for you.

    Also: the first school where I taught used to do that a bit with literacy. ;) It was like... everyone do this. Now do this. Now jump through a hoop on fire. Are the test scores up yet?
     
  15. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 3, 2012

    Our math common core expert specifically showed us the "I do, we do, you do" model at a training on the common core. The "I do" part is just a bit shorter and more focused on the language of math.
     
  16. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,972
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 3, 2012

    I think anyone that can design a program that incorporates all the learning standards is pretty spectacular! HATS OFF TO YOU!
     
  17. queenie

    queenie Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,392
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 4, 2012

    I saw one of our kindergarten teachers using those great big wooden blocks to play a game with the kids- the whole group would count by ones (or fives) as one child would stack the blocks slowly until they eventually fell over.

    She also plays a game where they stand in a circle and count around the circle. When they make a mistake they are out and must sit down in their spot in the circle. Play continues until everyone is out or they have reached their highest number (in your case, 120). I thought maybe it would be good for a kid who is out to sit out for one round and then get back in?
     
  18. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 4, 2012

    Queenie - that actually sounds good (the round game). Luckily, we have another 1st grade teacher at our school and (after 11 weeks), she finally decided that she could do the math plans (and health & science) and I could do the ELA and SS (ELA is MUCH more involved). Of course, I end up doing most of the planning anyway.... sorry to sound bitter, but I kind of am.... I was at Office Depot yesterday and found a great deal (8 packs of glue sticks for 50 cents each), so after I got home, I called her & told her about it. Her reaction was "you didn't get me any?" (yes, she was serious). My first thought was "I already raised my daughter." Sorry, it's just getting really old.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 228 (members: 2, guests: 196, robots: 30)
test