color coded number line

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by uclalum, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. uclalum

    uclalum Groupie

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    Sep 8, 2007

    Do any of you use a color coded number line in math. I found one online. It says it is used to teach multiplication. I think it can be used to teach divisibility rules and equivalent fractions in the fifth grade.
    Here is the link: let me know what you think...
    http://www.teachertreasures.com/colornumberline.htm
     
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  3. etcetera83

    etcetera83 Cohort

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    Sep 9, 2007

    The number line is a simpler version of the counting tape used with EveryDay Counts Calendar Math. I have seen from experience that the counting tape is effective with helping the kids learn divisibility rules, equivlanet fractions and remember multiplication. I like number line you found because it is personal and each child can have their own copy. Great idea!
     
  4. Occabacca

    Occabacca Companion

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    Nov 26, 2007

    I can't pull up this website, if anyone has a copy of this number line can you PLEASE pm me.

    thanks ahead of time
     
  5. MsMaggs

    MsMaggs Comrade

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    Nov 26, 2007

    I can't pull it up either. Could you pm the website address to me too? Thanks.
     
  6. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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  7. uclalum

    uclalum Groupie

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    Nov 26, 2007

    Sorry. I just got home a little while ago. Thanks for fixing the link. You can use it to reduce/simplify fractions. For example, if you are trying to reduce the fraction 4/12, you look at the 4 and 12 and find out which color is the highest color they have in common. That color shows you what you need to divide by. So since the highest color is green, you need to divide by 4.
    I didn't show this to my kids until after I showed them how to do it without the number line.
    It's also useful for finding the lowest common multiple. Again, show them how to find the lcm without the color coded # line first so that they understand why it works.
     
  8. pokybloom

    pokybloom Rookie

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    Nov 27, 2007

    Doesn't no child left behind say it has to be 90 min per day in math? We have 60 min on Fridays and I don't teach new content because it isn't enough time!!
     
  9. pokybloom

    pokybloom Rookie

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    Nov 27, 2007

    This is cute, thanks!! I can't believe I still have kids who don't know their times tables, it makes me sad. They drilled it in me when I was a kid, and it is very useful to know.
     
  10. uclalum

    uclalum Groupie

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    Nov 27, 2007

    I'm not sure. My school requires 60 minutes each day. I give my kids math from 9-10:25. I have more time than the other teachers though because I don't have to teach the Into English program because I don't have any English learners this year.
     
  11. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Dec 2, 2007

    Wow! That is an awesome find! I don't teach math this year but I bookmarked it in case I do again. I think it would work very well for visual learners.
     
  12. Occabacca

    Occabacca Companion

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    Dec 2, 2007

    I don't mean to sound stupid.
    But can you tell me other ways you use that number line in your teachings
     
  13. uclalum

    uclalum Groupie

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    Dec 2, 2007

    Those are the ways I used it so far. LCM and GCF. I suppose you could use it for division. For example: 12/4 how many green dots are there from 4 to 12? 3 grren dots. We also looked at it when I taught the kids about prime numbers.
     
  14. Occabacca

    Occabacca Companion

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    Dec 3, 2007

    thats what i'm teaching now is prime and composite, lcf, gcf.
     
  15. uclalum

    uclalum Groupie

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    Dec 3, 2007

    Is it helping?
     
  16. Occabacca

    Occabacca Companion

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    Dec 3, 2007

    call me an idiot I still haven't quite figured how to use it for prime, compostite gcm and lcf

    duh

    why am i so stupid!!!!
     
  17. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Dec 3, 2007

    Just look at the colors and look to see what color dots both numbers have. If they have any color dots that are the same, find the biggest colored dot number. That would be GCF. So, for 4 and 12, they both have red and green dots. The green dot represents a larger number (red=2 and green=4).

    Hope that helps!



    (edited: I found a couple of mistakes in my message regarding this. I erased those but am way too tired to redo my whole message. I'll keep the top part because that's fine... I think)
     
  18. Occabacca

    Occabacca Companion

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    Dec 4, 2007

    i really studied it today and think I have a better idea of it. Plus your example helped a lot.

    THANK YOU!!!!
     

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