Color blind student

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Maryhf, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Nov 12, 2013

    I have an excellent student (gifted) in my geography class who is color blind. I am certain he will study and work hard. As we get into map work, it seems unnecessary for him to color different areas. Am I missing something?
     
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  3. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Nov 12, 2013

    I wouldn't think so. More and more board game designers are making games color blind friendly, with the pieces marked by color as well as symbol.
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Nov 12, 2013

    But the colors serve a purpose, right? If so, I would ask he use designs such as dots, swirls, and lines to designate different areas and features.
     
  5. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I'm confused. :)
     
  6. glen

    glen Companion

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    Nov 12, 2013

    Both of my sons are colorblind. They can see some colors clearly, others they can't distinguish between. For them, the darker the color gets, the more difficulty they have. Could you let him choose the colors/ shades he uses? They're both in college now, and I only remember once when the inability to distinguish between colors was a minor issue in class (difficulty reading a graph or map because the colors used were too similar).
     
  7. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Thanks for the replies. I asked him the extent of the color blindness and it sounds like all colors look alike. The coloring helps designate certain areas of a map and helps students learn locations. I like the idea of using patterns rather than colors.
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Nov 12, 2013

    Tell your student for me to use a light touch when drawing patterns, so he can still read the labels under them. I'm guessing he *does* distinguish shades (= darker vs. lighter), so he can also vary up his patterns with darker and lighter gray.

    It strikes me that it might be possible for him to use technology to translate colors in a digital map or diagram: if one has used colors from its standard palette for a font, for example, MS Word will tell what color a given letter is, and there are doubtless image-processing apps that will do the same for the areas in a diagram or map. Conversely, he might be able to get an image-processing program to translate map/diagram colors into consistent shades and patterns. (Hm. I wonder whether there's a standard convention for that translation? If not, he could invent his own.)
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 12, 2013

    Are you more concerned about him reading maps or creating them?
     
  10. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Nov 12, 2013

    I'm actually not as concerned with his ability to read maps, since his work ethic will help him distinguish borders without benefit of colors on political maps. Sometimes we label blank maps with mountains, rivers, etc.- still no problem. The question came up in my mind yesterday because we were doing our intro to mapping and coloring each continent a different color. I don't want to make him do a task that will only become busy work and not serve any purpose when it comes time to study for a test.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 12, 2013

    If the map is 'busy work' you might consider why anyone is doing it. If your goal is using colors as discriminating features on a map, remind your student that his colored pencils/crayons are labeled with color names...or have him use different patterns as described above....
    My dad is color blind. Other than having my mom match his ties to shirts, it never was an issue. He developed coping skills. So shall your student with your support and guidance.
     

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