College Choice Matters?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Math, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. Math

    Math Cohort

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    I wanted to know on your views of choices for college. I have three that I have applied to and would be content with going to anyone of them. My list consists of Bloomfield College, Rutgers, and Seton Hall. Now, getting accepted to anyone would be fantastic for me. However, does it matter which one I go to? I know a person said that those who graduate from Seton Hall are looked at over other applicants since it is a well known university. I have no idea how true it is. Like what if I opt to go to Bloomfield College would I find it harder to get a job as a Math Teacher? I already know the economy itself is rough.
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I went to State College, and I became a teacher. I don't think which college you went to is much of a huge concern when hiring for teachers unless perhaps you're applying to a very prestigious school. Although my Principal was happy that I was an alumnus from her college as well. (which may have had something to do with it)

    My advice is to just put in your applications and pick whichever one you feel would be the best fit for you.
     
  4. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Bloomfield College was my first choice ever. Would you say that someone like me who wants to be a High School Math Teacher should have a master's degree? If so, right out of college or teach first then go back?
     
  5. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    It matters very, very little in most fields. It might matter in highly selective fields and it definitely matters for certain PHD programs but for the most part it isn't going to matter in the least as far as teaching is concerned.

    Go with the college that fits you best and will best place you where you want to work.

    As far as your master's goes, most people will recommend not getting it right away since, wrong or right, there is a feeling that having a masters makes you less desirable since it means you will cost more in salary. I personally think that happens way less than anyone thinks it does (and I'd say possibly never) so I'd again say go with what works for you.
     
  6. Math

    Math Cohort

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    I was thinking on the terms of teaching high school math. Since you know there is Calculus, Trig, Stats, etc... the high level math courses basically. I was thinking maybe schools would prefer the teacher have a masters in content when teaching those courses specifically?
     
  7. RadiantBerg

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    I don't think it matters too much in terms of actually finding the job, but what you learn may be drastically different. I went to one of those 3 schools you listed. Feel free to PM me for more details on that.
     
  8. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Do you have any way to talk to a principal in your area?

    I know at the school I sub in, all but 1 teacher out of all hired in the last 10 years came from the same college. The 1 that didn't go there has 4 family members that teach in the district. I overheard the P talking to a high school student one day stating that they give special consideration to graduates of that college.
     
  9. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Majority of the teachers in my school attended one of the three colleges I listed. Then there is a new teacher who attended one of the colleges I listed. Then the rest of the teachers as far as I know are a mixture of different colleges.
     
  10. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    I'd say 90% of the teachers within my district attended the same Cal. State University. It's super close to home and is well-known for producing lots of K-12 educators.

    I do, however, believe that the college you attend won't influence your level of marketability.

    I will echo what everyone else has said: Choose the university that you think will be the best fit for your needs.
     
  11. Glühwürmchen

    Glühwürmchen Rookie

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    My dad says master's first since he got his MBA while working and it was really hard, but I think most people on these boards recommend getting experience. I don't know what I'll do, but we've got 4 years to worry about that! Focus on undergrad :p I'm sure you'll be prepared to teach all the advanced classes.

    As for college, do what you think is right. The college probably does hold some importance, but in the end it's more important to make yourself the best applicant by getting involved with stuff. Whatever makes you stand out. Also, college does not equal department strength. Look at their program of studies and snoop their websites. Education especially because the quality varied considerably between the colleges I looked at.

    Good luck! I got all my college stuff done super early and now I'm watching my friends do it. I'm stressed for them!! :lol:
     
  12. bros

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    I'd say look into Kean and Montclair.

    If you are close enough, look into Monmouth.

    Around here (Central NJ, and also around the Kean area), most teachers seem to be from Kean, Montclair, or Monmouth.

    Keep in mind with Rutgers, that they do a five year BA/BS program that doesn't even give you a masters at the end of it, even though you do coursework equivalent to the MAT courses.
     
  13. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    I went to a private women's university. It was one of the seven sisters, and while it wasn't super prestigious, it still had prestige.

    I don't think it affected my job search much at all. However, since I was someone who was lacking in confidence before college, the small class sizes and the women's only environment did wonders for me. I don't think I would have been the same teacher or person without going to the same college.
     
  14. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    I went to Rutgers. I started in their ed program but transferred out because I hated their approach so much.
     
  15. physteach

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    RU also has a 5 year BA/MEd program, so that works.
     
  16. teacherguy111

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    I don't think it really effects the hiring process much. I went to a tiny private christian college and now teach in a large urban school district.
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Go with your first choice,if accepted.you want to feel comfortable at whatever school you choose. Your other choices are top notch..You can't go wrong with any of them.

    In the competitive education market of NJ, you should get as much experience as possible before graduating. Observe and volunteer in classrooms, get on sub lists for breaks after your second year of college,seek summer employment working with kids: camps, tutoring, etc. Sseek employment following your undergrad and then start your grad work after securing a job. NJ districts are looking for education AND experience...a grad degree with no experience isn't competitive...schools would rather hire you at less $$. You can start your grad degree...just try to secure a position before finishing.
     
  18. Math

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    Mind sharing what you hated so much about the approach?
     
  19. Math

    Math Cohort

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    I think subbing scares me the most though. I see a lot of substitutes don't get a lot of respect from students. Well, especially in my school the students don't act right when there is a sub. Not all the time but probably about 90% of the time the class is not acting the same. I can definitely see myself tutoring or working at a camp.
     
  20. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    Feel free to PM if you want. :)
     
  21. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    It can definitely matter depending on your area. I know a band teacher who was hired because he went to OSU. Our teachers are from a lot of different schools. I do think my P looks more highly at some because he's impressed by the quality he's gotten from teachers and student teachers from those institutions.

    What are the job placement rates at those schools? I'm not sure if they keep those kind of stats or not.
     
  22. Math

    Math Cohort

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    I am not really sure about the job placement stats. I was aiming at Bloomfield because of the small class sizes as well.
     
  23. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I don't know anything about the three you're looking at, but I went to a large, public university. Because of my major, my average class size was only 20. I loved having the smaller class sizes! I got to know my professors well, and I typically had them for multiple classes, especially my English ones.
     
  24. teachart

    teachart Comrade

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    The program is more important than the college.

    My college is not prestigious. The art ed department however is. It has a 100% placement rate and schools contact the department head to fill positions. Our program is more rigorous than the prestigious universities in Michigan, we do more field placements and classes than other art ed programs. That's why I picked it.
     
  25. i8myhomework

    i8myhomework Comrade

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    Unless you attend an ivy or a top ten school it really doesn't matter. Just focus on which has the best programs for what you want to do.
     
  26. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Subs do have it rough. As you noticed students think they can automatically get away with anything with a sub. Part of getting that experience means going up against that and coming out having learned something or even coming out successful if you can. There are a lot of subs who can demand the respect of students and if you can get to that point, you'll be seen as a valuable teacher. Even having the experience on your CV will be seen as valuable.
     
  27. bros

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    My brother was in Rutger's 5 year Education program before transferring to Kean. He didn't like the limited amount of field experience needed (You only needed to have 24 hours of observation for sophomore field, then you had no more classroom experience until student teaching)

    If you're worried about class sizes, nothing at Kean is over 35 students. Most education classes cap at 30, some at 20-25.

    Rutgers has hundreds of students per class.
     
  28. RadiantBerg

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    True about the class sizes, but not for education classes. Most of the education classes were 15-25. It was the other departments with big class sizes.
     
  29. teacherguy111

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    I don't feel like it has mattered much for me in Ohio. I went to a tiny private christian school with only about 500 students, now I work at a magnet school in a big urban city in Ohio. The school is even partnered with Ohio state.
     
  30. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    I went to a small public college that probably no one would know about outside of my home state.

    It doesn't matter. I'd recommend you go to the cheapest option so you don't have to deal with crippling debt for the next 30 years of your life.
     
  31. smpeterson77

    smpeterson77 Rookie

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    I don't think it matters too much as far as getting a job. A Rutgers degree does go a long way though! You may want to consider something else, when I went to college, I was deciding between rutgers and rowan in nj. I ultimately decided that Rutgers was way too big for me, and i'd get lost in the shuffle, so I went with Rowan. I got a lot of personal attention at rowan, you might get that at bloomfield.
    Good luck!
     
  32. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I definitely know it CAN matter, but it's not the end-all, be-all like it is in other careers. I'm the only graduate from my college at my current school, but my P has mentioned being impressed with the curriculum at my college, which is pretty cool to know :) I also know English departments who like hiring grads from my program when they can because they usually know what they're getting. Our professor is very much admired in the area. His letters of rec can definitely help locally. But they're not going to mean you instantly get hired.
     
  33. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Is your brother having a better experience than you had, bros?

    Kean has suffered through some controversy over the past few years. There are quite a few NJ schools that have great reputations for their Ed programs...the OP is in good stead at any of the schools he mentioned.:2cents:
     
  34. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    Now I am curious as to which school this is! Is it because the P went there or has ties with the university or is it the quality of their program?
     
  35. bros

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    He's having a better experience so far, although with a few bumps along the way. He's had some difficulty with some classes. He didn't start having trouble with classes until college, then he began failing classes. Very odd.

    Kean has had quite the fun amount of controversies the last few years (I don't know which I like more, Farahi's resume or the fact that he still hasn't negotiated a contract with the professors)

    Yeah, NJ is filled to the brim with great education schools.
     
  36. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Update: I got a letter of acceptance today from Bloomfield College! My first acceptance letter, yay!!! :D
     
  37. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Congrats, Math!
     
  38. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    Congratulations! :)
     
  39. Ima Teacher

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    That depends on where you teach. In my state you have to have a MA within 10 years, and at least 50% of it has to be finished by year 5. I taught one year, then started my MA program in January of my second year. I taught full time and finished my first MA in two years.
     
  40. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Change of plans... I will be attending Seton Hall University.
     
  41. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Congratulations!
     

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