Cognitive skills

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by MuckeyBusiness, Dec 8, 2013.

  1. MuckeyBusiness

    MuckeyBusiness Companion

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    Dec 8, 2013

    I know this sounds so simple but could someone explain cognitive skills in simple terms to me. My mind is drawing a complete blank. We have a section in our lesson plan that says list at least one activity, material, oor experience that will meet each of the following areas of development and content: One of those areas is cognitive and it can be something in our lesson plan and I never know what to put for cognitive. Can someone help explain?

    Also I was wondering if anyone can send me some resources. On another part of the lesson plan there's an objective for the week i can write out and a method to achieve that objective... sometimes i have a hard time thinking for the second one.. can anyone send me some resources?

    I know I don't always make the most sense in my original post so if you need to explain more just let me know.
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Dec 8, 2013

    This article has a good, basic description of what cognitive skills look like in preschool. It seems to me like these things would best be taught through play and conversations with the teacher, but if you need to directly address how you will work on them, you could insert sorting and sequencing activities into the lesson plan. If you are reading a story, you could talk about or act out what happened in the beginning, middle, and end. Puzzles would be a good activity to include also.
     
  4. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Dec 9, 2013

    Cognitive skills are skills that a child uses to process the environment around them. It's easier to think about cognitive skills as problem solving skills. If you look at an assessment like teaching strategies gold, cognitive development includes:

    *Demonstrating positive approaches to learning
    -attends and engages
    -persists
    -solves problems
    -shows curiosity and motivation
    -shows flexibility and inventiveness in thinking

    *Remembers and connects experiences information
    -recognizes and recalls
    -makes connections

    *Uses classification skills Information

    *Uses symbols and images to represent something not present Information
    -Thinks symbolically
    -Engages in sociodramatic play

    I teach a special education preschool class and a lot of my students have cognitive goals on their IEPs. This includes working on attention span, sorting and matching by different attributes, putting together puzzles, engaging in pretend play, etc... A lot of these things are things that you probably already have in your classroom centers, but you can do them in large group too.

    For example, this week my class is studying winter, so during large group I gave everyone a blue, white, or green snowflake and they had to place their snowflake in the correct basket with the matching color. We also play games to encourage pretend play. One of their favorites is "Queen of the World" where I wave a magic wand and say "I'm the queen of the world and I turn you all into bumblebees!" and they have to pretend to be a bee until I say freeze. I let each of them have a turn turning their friends into something different. You can also use props to encourage symbolic thinking. Sometimes I get out a ruler and I'll say "Today I brought the most amazing toy in the world because I can turn it into anything I want it to be!" We take turns turning the ruler into a paintbrush, golf club, baby, pencil, etc.. and the students have to guess what we are pretending that it is. We also practice recalling information a lot. One of the simple ways to do this as a group is to get 4-5 items like scissors, glue, pencil, and marker. Talk about the items and then have the students close their eyes and take one of the items away. Ask the students to figure out which item is missing. You can play this over and over, taking away more items as they get more familiar with the activity. We also play this game with the students and have 1 of the students leave the group and hide, then the others have to guess who is hiding.

    Hope this helps!
     
  5. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Dec 12, 2013

    I just visited the Head Start web site. I was going to suggest a page on this site, but found so many interesting pages that I had to read. There is a lot of info at Head Start. There are definitions of cognitive as well as other domains.
     
  6. Missus James

    Missus James Rookie

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    Dec 12, 2013

    What exactly is the topic and the objective of your lesson plan?
     
  7. wyvern

    wyvern Companion

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    Dec 18, 2013

    0929 gives an excellent description and definition. I think the easiest way to think of it in short terms is "thinking skills" and "Problem solving" skills.
     

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