Co-Teaching

Discussion in 'General Education' started by YoungTeacherGuy, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

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    Jun 23, 2013

    How, exactly, are we in two completely different worlds when we're talking about the same teaching model?

    Also, this year I'm co-teaching 4 out of 6 classes; the other two are electives that don't need a co-teaching model.

    It just seems awfully narrow-minded to say you're going to "run far away" from something that you've never actually given a chance to work.
     
  2. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jun 24, 2013

    Co-teaching is the model you're personally accustomed to (since I read in another thread that you're a first year teacher). If you'd taught solo for several years like I have, it'd be difficult to adjust to having another adult teach alongside you for an entire day.

    I stand by everything I said. Let's respectfully agree to disagree.
     
  3. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jun 24, 2013

    Well, you're not alone...I also stand by my statement that I would die. Possibly slightly dramatic, but I would most likely look for other positions. With several years experience not involving co-teaching, poor collaborative efforts, a school not set up for co-teaching, and my personality...I would be miserable.
     
  4. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

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    Jun 24, 2013

    I did teach solo both in student-teaching and in several long-term substitute positions. It would be difficult for me to adjust to a lot of things, but I'm not going to run away from everything that may be "difficult."
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jun 24, 2013

    To each his own.
     
  6. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jun 24, 2013

    I think it's great that you're all being honest with yourselves about who you are and what you're capable of doing. I think co-teaching can be a wonderful thing, if implemented correctly. As we've already discussed on this thread, one of the key components is the attitudes of and the relationship between the two teachers that comprise the team. If someone is not open to co-teaching, they probably won't make a good co-teacher. Both parties of the team would likely be unhappy and, therefore, ineffective. As long as we have some people out there that are willing and eager to do it and committed to doing it right, students should have success. While I wish more teachers, both reg. ed. and sped, were open and willing to try co-teaching, I'm glad to know that some teachers know themselves well enough to be honest about who they are. With that said, though, I would encourage everyone to keep an open mind about it, if it's ever something you have no choice not to do.
     
  7. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Jun 24, 2013

    I'm ashamed to say this is me.

    As YoungTeacherGuy mentioned above (and forgive my paraphrasing) - I would feel the final test results (and their overall success) would like with me (unless we're completely 50/50).

    I do admire men and women who CAN co-teach, because I feel it says a lot about them and their ability to compromise and collaborate. I'm just not there. :eek:

    A follow-up question... do you think gender of the teacher(s) plays a role? Do you think it's easier/harder if the team is:
    both female
    both male
    one male/one female?

    Or does gender really not matter?
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jun 24, 2013

    I've been in a variety of co-teaching situations for the past 5 years. Most have been wonderful; some have been horrible. Age and gender haven't been as important as attitude. When both teachers are able to take responsibility for collaborating and working with all students, everyone benefits. The ideal is when the students have no real idea that one of the teachers is a Special Ed teacher and is assigned to the class because of specific students.
     
  9. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Jun 24, 2013

    Attitude is HUGE. One of my fellow intervention specialists had a horrible time with her co-teaching assignments due to the attitude of her co-teacher. You have to want to co-teach. If someone forces you into it, you're not going to make it work.
     
  10. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Jun 24, 2013

    It is almost impossible in a high school situation to not have the gen ed teacher be the lead teacher. High school level content can take a few years to master for a SPED teacher without a content degree.

    I tell students that I'm in class as a tutor, and I help them all - while keeping myself ready to focus on the SPED students if they are struggling. I don't feel expert enough in math to lead lessons - especially in Algebra 2. Definitely not in Physics!

    I do some coplanning, but it usually consists of consulting to find ways to support the SPED students. I wouldn't have time to plan for my own SPED tutorials and for the variety of Gen Ed classes I'm assigned to. Because the content moves so quickly in High School classes, I find it to be a full time job helping my students keep up with projects and notebooks, and creating accommodated tests, rubrics and study guides (and I grade any work that I accommodate).

    I have never felt bored, ineffectual, or not busy enough. I'm actually quite thankful we are not expected to coplan for all the students and stand at the front and teach.
     
  11. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jun 24, 2013

    This is exactly what I don't want to be. :(

    Thankfully, one of our district coordinators actually used that word ("tutor") to tell us what our jobs are NOT. She wasn't talking about a co-teaching situation necessarily. She was mainly reaffirming that our role as pull-out resource teachers is not that of a tutor. Meaning that we're not there for teachers to send sped kids with assignments from the regular ed room to us so that they can expect us to help them finish it. Made me happy to hear that from a higher-up!

    I do see your point though, in the context of secondary education.
     
  12. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Jun 24, 2013

    Well there's only one male teacher at my school (elementary) so I can't really speak to this. But I think it's more a personality thing. My close friend is across the hall co-teaching and has a great relationship with her co-teacher. But I don't think it would go smoothly if I co-taught with either of them. Our personalities and temperaments don't mesh.
     
  13. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Jun 24, 2013

    Yes, elementary and secondary are very different - for gen ed and sped students and teachers. In secondary we go from class to class with different teachers (6-7 per day at my school - which is why I tell students I'm a tutor - they know I'm not a physics, biology, history and math teacher!).

    I guess I should clarify that they don't think I'm an aide - they know I'm a teacher and that I have a classroom. They also know I teach tutorial classes that support students who need extra help. ( I don't see a negative connotation to being a tutor, by the way. All the teachers at my school do after school tutoring and many teach classes called "tutorials.")
     
  14. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jun 24, 2013


    Oh no.. I didn't mean to imply that being a tutor was a negative thing. There's nothing wrong with tutoring! I just meant that I didn't want other teachers to see me as a tutor when that's not my actual role.

    I guess I'm interpreting this in the context of my own experience... When I first arrived at my current school, there was a big problem with teachers just sending students to my room so that I could help them finish the work they weren't finishing in the regular room. That would be fine, except that my role as a resource teacher, as defined by my supervising coordinator, was to provide "something different" that the students weren't able to get in the regular room - an intervention of some type. In her words, I was not to serve the role of a tutor.

    Although, now that I think about it deeper, many tutors do, in fact, provide interventions that students aren't receiving in the classroom. So, I guess I'm stuck on the wording because of how my supervising coordinator had explained it to me. Sorry. :blush:
     
  15. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Jun 24, 2013

    At that age do the students know the have IEPs? Do they know they're special education students? Aren't special ed. students in high school sometimes included in their IEP meetings?
     
  16. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jun 24, 2013

    I completely understand what you're saying! I had the same problem when I started in resource. I had to be pretty firm about my role being providing different instruction, not just helping with gen ed assignments. I do thin it would be helpful for students to have someone helping with their gen ed work, but IMO that alone doesn't really qualify as sped services. I see my role more as teaching them the skills that they aren't able to learn correctly in gen ed alone. Next year I'll have a para, which will be very different for me! Obviously I'll have to figure out how they expect the program to work, but I would think helping in gen ed classes and maybe tutoring with gen ed assignments would be great tasks for her to do.
     

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