Close reading

Discussion in 'General Education' started by otterpop, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jul 30, 2019

    One goal I have this year is to get students reading silently and independently more. Not necessarily from books of choice, which I also strongly promote, but more from textbooks and worksheets. When reading a "boring" text (as is sometimes required), I found my students last year relied too much on the various engagement strategies that I used such as partner reading, group work, teacher read aloud, and class lessons to the point where when the rare day came when I said something to the effect of "silently read pages 56-58 in your textbook" they were not paying attention to what they read and were not retaining much information.

    What's the best way to get students to focus when they're reading required texts that they don't necessarily enjoy? I teach upper elementary. Cornell notes? Annotating with post its? What other suggestions do you have?
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2019
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 30, 2019

    I have not tried it myself, but I’ve been told that teaching signposts can help greatly with this. If you’re not familiar, check out the books Notice & Note (there is a book for teaching signposts with fiction texts and one for nonfiction texts).
     
  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jul 30, 2019

    Thank you, I will look into it and do find googling on signposts. I've never heard of those before.
     

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