Classroom Modifications

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by 1st-yr-teacher, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. 1st-yr-teacher

    1st-yr-teacher Comrade

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    Apr 3, 2012

    What modifications can be used in the classroom for students who are ADHD-inattentive type? I know medication is a big thing but what can be done in the classroom to help those students who have been diagnosed but not on medication?

    I have found modifications for those who need to move a lot and have extra energy. I am looking for something for those that don't have any behavior issues but just can not focus in class.
     
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  3. Gareth

    Gareth Rookie

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    Apr 3, 2012

    What about a stress ball that they can squeeze in one hand, something that they can play with but eventually not have to focus on too much. For the students that have trouble focusing I think getting them to repeat back the instructions is a good way to help them remember what they actually are.
     
  4. 1st-yr-teacher

    1st-yr-teacher Comrade

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    I do that. It helps with them knowing what to do with work but I am still struggling with keeping them engaged when I am teaching a new concept/skill. I can not keep their focus.
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Apr 3, 2012

    A timer, bright colored paper, movement (a quick walk), having them write something down or do something while you are teaching.
     
  6. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Seating near the teacher, special job (hold my marker, pass out the books, etc, anything to keep them moving), breaks (go walk down the hallway and come back), find something that really interests the child to keep them focused/motivated, one of my adhd students loves sharks so i checked a shark book out of the library and whenever he shows a lot of effort/focus on his work i let him read the book for a few minutes as a reward.
     
  7. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    One of the distractors for kids with ADHD is too much "STUFF" on the walls. Most classrooms have stuff everywhere and it's just too much stimulus for those children. I have one student who would spend the entire lesson staring at the same essay hanging on a bulletin board near his desk, day after day, as if it held different information every few minutes. He couldn't help himself. I finally had to strip the board to get him to listen and learn. I can't imagine it didn't drive him up the wall realizing he was reading the same essay over and over again. Poor kid!
     
  8. 1st-yr-teacher

    1st-yr-teacher Comrade

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    So the movement will help with those who are just inattentive not hyperactive? I think I will try the focus/motivated with reward technique. I have them sitting up front and I am constanly in front of one of them but they just can't focus for more than 15 seconds(it seems...) I redirect and start to talk again and they are zoned.
     
  9. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    How many are you talking about? Also, if you google "classroom modifications ADHD" you'll see links for tons of lists of things to do. It may be helpful to let us know which you've tried, tried some you haven't tried, and then we can narrow down and focus on more child-specific issues.
     
  10. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Here are some I've found helpful:

    1. Cut up your worksheets and make them smaller. ADHD need to see a few problems at a time and don't handle large assignments well. After child is done, you can give them next part of the worksheet.

    2. Have them sit by another student that they are able to work with.

    3. A drum is great! Allow them to drum at key times after a few minutes of instruction. If not a drum, a kush ball or tennis ball works well.

    4. Sit them near the teacher

    5. Remove as many distractions between you and the student.
     
  11. 1st-yr-teacher

    1st-yr-teacher Comrade

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    Two students. As for what I have done...I have them sitting up front because thaat is where I spend the majority of my time. I have them repeat back what I have said(as much as possible). It is about 50/50 on whether not they can repeat back what was said. I make sure to write down what they need to complete during independent work time.

    They do fairly well with completing their work during morning work and during independent work time. It is just when I am introducing a new concept/skill, they just can not seem to focus. I like the idea of getting them involved with "helping".

    I tried googling again and several websites popped up. I googled earlier but didn't get nearly the results...I can't remember what I "searched" though. :)

    I guess what I am finding is that a lot of the modifications used for hyperactivity/impulse control can be used for those who are of the inattentive type. Is that correct? These two have no problem controlling their behaviors(other than focus/daydreaming). They follow the class rules(for the most part).
     
  12. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    One other idea is right after you give an instruction--have the ADHD (and even the rest of the class) pair-share. As you know ADHD students have short attention spans, so if you can keep your talking short and then have them pair-share, I have found this to help.
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Apr 3, 2012

    Write the instructions on the board, that may also help.
     
  14. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Look into Universal Design for Learning. I was introduced to it during a grad class last year and had to redesign some of my units based on it. It's a lot of work, but has been an amazing change. It allows all of my learners to access the same information using all modalities.
     
  15. Curiouscat

    Curiouscat Comrade

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    Sounds weird but I have a student that can focus if I give him a fat marker that he rolls back and forth with one foot. The other day he was rolling two of them in opposite directions at the same time. Caution....it doesn't work for every child! I tried it with one child and it kept flying across the room "on accident." After the second "accident" the marker was put away.
     
  16. traveler

    traveler Comrade

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    I have put a strip of velcro under a student's desk. It gives them sensory input.
     
  17. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    You are exactly right in that many accommodations for students with the hyper activity also work for a student who is more inattentive. They all do not work for every student, so it is finding what works for your students.

    I find that having them try to find answers before teaching can set a purpose when you are instructing. Also having the students pair-share is a great idea, it gets them involved in their learning and if they miss something, their partner may have heard.
     
  18. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    Apr 4, 2012

    I like everyone's ideas...I also put an index card on the child's desk and when I'm walking through the room and find them inattentive, I tap or point to the card and it helps them come back to me. My old counselor also used to talk to the kids about self-monitoring their behavior so they learned to stay more focused.
     
  19. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Apr 5, 2012

    Glad you found a few websites :). Interesting you mention they do fine during morning and independent work. Why do you think they can pay attention better during those times? Do they have a hard time with new material in all subjects?
     
  20. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Apr 5, 2012

    Our counselor sometimes has the kids write a "secret code word" or draw a picture (a turtle if they need to slow down, a remote control to remember to "tune in" to the right things) on an index card taped to their desk. I've found them to be helpful, too.
     

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