Classroom Mangement HELPPPPPPPP!!

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by nonii3, Jan 29, 2009.

  1. nonii3

    nonii3 Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2009

    Hello everyone, I come once again seeking your advice.

    I have an 8th grade math class, Special Education self contained class. There are 18 kids in that class and as you know it is very hard to sometimes keep these kids focused. I have them for 120 minutes...which makes it twice as hard. My question is the following: There are two of us teahcer in the class, and we have two different rooms available on the second floor for us to use.

    Do you guys have any suggestions as far as what we could do? I do not want to divide the class in half and basically create two different classes because we are not allowed. However, we can use both rooms, meaning, SINCE THIS IS A MATH CLASS, DO YOU HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS AS FAR AS HOW WE CAN USE THESE TWO DIFFERENT ROOMS TO OUR ADVANTAGE? MEANING, MANY HAVE ONE ROOM BE THE DIRECT INSTRUCTION ROOM (WHERE WE ONLY HAVE 9 STUDENTS (HALF) AND THEN HAVE THEM ROTATE AND GO TO THE OTHER ROOM WHERE THEY DO INDEPENDENT WORK OR WORK ON ANOTHER SKILL? ETC.... PLEASE LET ME KNOW ANY GOOD IDEAS YOU COME UP WITH, I WILL TAKE ANY INTO CONSIDERATION....THANKS AGAIN FOR ALL YOUR HELP.

    JAKE
     
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  3. SocWkr-Tchr

    SocWkr-Tchr Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2009

    Oh, I would use the extra rooms and time to your advantage. Check out the various methods of co-teaching. How much planning time do you and the other teacher have? Good co-teaching does take a lot of planning time, but it is well worth it.

    I co-teach a math class that has a mixture of "gen ed" and "sepecial ed" students. The other teacher and I like to do station teaching and we make sure to mix up the stations a lot. So it's not just special ed in one group and gen ed in another. Mixing up the groups is really important, in my opinion.
     
  4. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Feb 9, 2009

    nonii,

    What is the "math" area that you are supposed to teach? Is it general math where you focus on- addition, subtraction, multplication, division, measurement, and other related math areas? What are some of the "disabilities" of your students in your classroom. I used to work with autism and profoundly multiple disabilities. I found out that students with "behavior" problems have disabilities which most call learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities are now individualized and you must understand if your students have specific learning disabilities before you can actually do some proper teaching. Is your classroom "student centered" in which it's not only "lecture." You need to be realistic about your attention span of your students, if it is limited they may need "breaks" in between as much as possible. Breaks do not mean it's "free time" either. Breaks from direct instruction to practicing basic skills that they need emphasis on according to their individual education plans. Do you have a lot of structure in your classroom?

    aspieteacher
     
  5. larana

    larana Rookie

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    Feb 21, 2009

    I would say for you to take of both rooms. Explain your lesson plan to the classroom and those student that understood the lesson my go to the next room and work individually. In the next room it should be quiet and student can concentrate on numbers. And the one's that need more help with math can stay in room one to be able to listen and see examples of the math problem. I hope this helps you a little.
    larana
     

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