Classroom Management Problems

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by NewKindy1, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. NewKindy1

    NewKindy1 Rookie

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    Aug 27, 2015

    Thanks

    Thanks! It's just so stressful and tiring and we have informal evaluations next month and I don't think it's going to go well, even with a behavior chart. A friend of mine said that she had one and she would make the students move the card or close pin, but my kids won't do that and they'll probably move it back when my back is turned. I don't know if ANYTHING will work with this group. What do you do about students who don't care if they're wrong and don't care if they miss a recess or a privilege and don't care if I send them to the principal or call their moms. These kids LIKE be disrespectful and getting in trouble. I just don't know what can make them listen to me when my voice falls on deaf ears.
     
  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Aug 27, 2015

    Could your tone of voice, facial expressions, and body posture be sending different signals than your words? Nothing sends students who tend to have disruptive behaviors to full blown problems than the smell of insecurity.

    Record/video your tone and your stance if possible and see if what you think you are expressing is actually how it is coming across the way you expect. You may be surprised that your voice or posture does not promote leadership.

    I don't believe in leading by fear, but the yardstick may be used to create that sharp sound to jolt them out of what they are doing. The reason the yardstick instills fears in people is because they remember when kids were whacked with them in school as a common practice. So, you need to find your "alert" sound or visual method. I've heard of those using whistles, but that is disruptive out of the classroom and some will associate it with training dogs (if they don't like the practice). I was one of those kids who never noticed the lights going off in the classroom. It did not alert me at all - not that I was talking to other students. Flickering of the lights did get my attention.

    I hope you find what works. Also, have your goal for student behaviors but realize that reaching it will take time and you will have more days where you are working on those goals than achieving that goal.
     
  3. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Aug 27, 2015

    You have no business quitting yet! Teaching can be a trial by fire. Feel free to come here if you need to sob now and then.

    I'm a huge fan of Michael Linsin and his blog.He tends to take the notion of classroom community a step further to make time-out a total removal from that community, practically to the point of the untouchable. He even says to keep kids in that time-out state for days if that's what is needed. It really is a state of pretty much ignoring them except for the main work.
     
  4. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

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    Aug 27, 2015

    I agree that you should never give up. Classroom management is a struggle for teachers for many years. I still struggle with it at times and I have been teaching for 6 years. It takes a lot of practice and time. My first couple of years teacher were dismal because of classroom management. Do you think you could have your aide take a step back while you gain control of your class? Right now she is seen as the authority figure and the teacher and may not take you seriously since you haven't been there on a consistent basis. Once they begin to see you as their teacher and leader, they may gain more respect towards you. They're little ones, so they're moldable and at the end of the day, they want to please their teachers and parents. Just stick to one system that works with other teachers at your school and don't give up!
     
  5. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Aug 27, 2015

    Yet this only works is you have created an environment where the student deires to be part of the class, that it is "fun". That the student is really missing something that he/she wants to partake in.

    What strategies or "things" do you do to create such an environment?
     
  6. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Aug 27, 2015

    And this doesn't even have to be laugh-out-loud playtime fun. And I suppose herein lies the art of management. You do want the ostracization process to eventually be a true punishment just by sure fact they don't get to be with the rest of the class.

    Even so, stay rigid in the consequences even if they don't seem to phase them.
     
  7. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Aug 27, 2015

    Staying rigid with the consequences is banging your head against the wall, unless the students "love school or look foreward to your class."

    What are some ways you do this? This is where I need to get some fresh ideas.
     
  8. NewKindy1

    NewKindy1 Rookie

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    All of this!!! How do you make school fun for kids who don't care? I can come up with song and dance all day, but these kids don't care and they won't get it, especially when their parents don't care either. The other teachers use websites with fun songs and interactive lessons, but I don't know if that will really help.
     
  9. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 27, 2015

    It is never too late to do this.
     
  10. NewKindy1

    NewKindy1 Rookie

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    What do you do if you do ostracize a student and enforce consequences and the students still don't listen to you and follow directions?
     
  11. NewKindy1

    NewKindy1 Rookie

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    I'm not going to quit. I've read his website and I agree with a lot of his advice, but I just don't know if his advice is practical in my case. These students just DO NOT CARE! I can enforce consequences and ignore the behavior but these students are relentless. I can be in the middle of an engaging, fun lesson and still have students talking. I can't really ignore the behavior because it's only going to get worse. I can send a student to sit away from the class, but he'll just laugh and not take it seriously. What about a student who likes being bad at school and at home. What about a situation when a student asks "Can I do this?" and I say no, and they just do it anyway? I ask a student to sit down before his bus gets called, he sits down for one minute, and asks "Can I do this?" I say "no", but he gets up to do it anyway. What do I do about that?
     
  12. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    I have not read the entire thread so this may have been suggested or you maay have tried it and it did not work...but here goes.

    One strategy that works for me is to spend a lot of time building a rapport with particular students who are disrupting class. Try spending time talking to them about things they like. Compliment them on things you notice, like maybe "hey, saw you playing a great game of basketball with your friends at recess"...etc. I have students bring in board games from time to time for free time, I use this time to sit down with certain students and play with them, joining in in their conversations. In my experience this takes time, will not work over night, but in the long run I find that it really really helps.

    I would also suggest using a time out to another room, not just a time out in your own room. It most likly will not change that students behavior, but that is not the point, sometimes you need to remove problem students, to protect the learning of other students. I have told classes at given times, "If you need a break, and do not want to actively participate in this lesson, you have my permission to join Mrs. whoever on the playground, I am going to work with those who are ready to learn. Those students who cannot participate, do not need to effect those who are ready to learn.
     
  13. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Aug 28, 2015

    Someone mentioned late last year about taking those students who are struggling with their behavior, and purposefully taking 2 minutes each day, for about 5-6 days, just to talk to that student about anything except for school stuff...that even that alone could end up helping quite a bit.
     
  14. smoothrunnin

    smoothrunnin Rookie

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    classroom management resource

    Take all the advice given on the posts given. The best thing you can do is go very, very, very slowly and establish very simple routines and practice them. A great resource for once you have a bit of breathing time is The Cornerstone: Classroom Management that makes Teaching Effective, Efficient and Enjoyable. Hang in there!
     
  15. TnKinder

    TnKinder Companion

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    Aug 28, 2015

    I've read this entire thread and I have not seen where the OP mentions any consequences for misbehavior. It seems like there is a lot of blaming the students with comments like "these kids don't care". Of course they care, they are five and in kindergarten. I've been in K for 5 years years. It's hard and exhausting, but its not their fault that there is a lack of structure in the class.

    Start Monday morning with routines, everything from how to come in and unpack materials to what they must do once unpacked. How to line up, move around the classroom, get and put material away. If anyone does it incorrectly practice again until they all do it correctly. If they are not listening, get their attention, I like to clap or say a pattern. This kids mimic and look at me. If every student does not respond do it again until until they do. You said, you do not want to use a clip chart, but you need to use something that will give immediate feed back to student. You should also send a daily report home for parent to sign and return. You said their parents "don't care". How do you know? Have you reached out to them? If behavior is particularly awful, I call parents on the spot. I explain that the child is being disruptive, not following directions, not completing activities. This can make a huge impact on the student. Invite parents to pop up and check on their students. Build a partnership with their parents and the students will fall in line.

    I honestly think a part of your problem is you attitude towards your students. It's like you have already determined that they are a bad bunch and that all they will be.
     
  16. smoothrunnin

    smoothrunnin Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2015

    Stop right there

    When you have told a student not to do something and they do it anyway, you STOP whatever you are doing and walk over to them without saying a word, make eye contact and then STARE them down pointing to where they are supposed to be. It may seem like an eternity before they comply but be patient! Even the toughest of cases will cave and comply. If they will not comply after a lengthy standoff, ask they will require you to call the office and let the principal know you will not do as you are asked. Hope this helps! Keep us posted.
     
  17. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    :agreed:
     
  18. LovetoteachPREK

    LovetoteachPREK Companion

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    OP, these kids are 5 and 6 years old. As naughty as they may seem to you, they are just little kids. They are looking for structure. They crave it. They need care and consistency. It kind of seems to me like you are getting great advice on here and you just keep saying "that won't work because..." and "these kids just don't care." It is your job to make your classroom a place where they care to be. Kindergarten kids should be filled with the joy and wonder of learning. I know that coming from a rough background can make this more challenging for some of them, but it IS possible.

    Plan a fun game to teach, model and review proper behaviors. If a student refuses to cooperate, send him out of the room with the aide. Don't get mad. Just say "oh no, what a bummer. If you can't follow the rules, you won't get to stay with us." Don't leave him out there too long, but welcome him back with open arms asking if he's ready to try again.

    Don't take the bad behavior personally, and don't show them that it gets to you. Just treat it like, bummer, you made a bad choice, here's what is going to happen now.

    Yeah, I use the word "bummer" a lot.

    You need to be firm and consistent, but also make your classroom filled with joy. Have fun with these kids, laugh and smile with them. As I said in my first reply, "get them to fall in love with you."

    They deserve a teacher who believes in them. If you refuse to believe in them, then I agree with the poster who said maybe this job is not for you.
     
  19. mandamouse123

    mandamouse123 Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2015

    :yeahthat:


    I agree with this 100%. I had written a similar post, LovetoteachPREK, but deleted it two seconds after posting, because mine was not nearly as nice as yours is.

    In addition: a wise woman once told me: You can't change the kids. You can only change yourself.
     
  20. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    OP, I am sharing a link with you that seems timely. It is my hope that once you have watched the 5-6 minutes, you will reconsider your class and take a strong look at your assumptions about your students. Perhaps if you change your attitude you will be able to work with the class you have been given.

    Please enjoy the video.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9TUrHMZMno
     
  21. NewKindy1

    NewKindy1 Rookie

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    Aug 30, 2015

    I'm not trying to write them off. It's not all of them, it's just a select few. I know that I need to give them structure and stability, but I'm a bit confused on how I should do that. I think a behavior chart and incentive pad may help. But are my rules to lax? Would they be too hard for 5 year olds to understand?
     
  22. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    OP,

    Here are 4 things that I have seen in Pre-K and K classrooms that make huge positive impacts in student behavior.

    1. A prop or other item to grab their attention. A teacher opening an envelope, a teacher opening a "present", or a teacher with a stuffed animal is nearly impossible for a 5 year old to ignore. 5 year olds are curious and will want to see what it is. Once you have their attention, all is possible.

    2. Though I never met you or your students, I know what all of you did this morning with nearly 100% accuracy. All of you brushed your teeth. Why? Not because of a great reward or fear of punishment, but because you always do that--it is a habit. The key to any classroom, is to develop positive habits until they do them without even thinking about them. This requires consistent routines and practice, practice, practice, practice. This will make or break your year.

    3. They use children's literature to help teach the behaviors and lessons they want to instill in their students. The best teachers are story tellers and read outstanding stories. They let these characters in stories be excellent teacher's helpers in demonstrating excellent choices.

    4. They have confidence in their students. They believe every child can behave and every child can learn. If they don't, they are persistent in their routines and never give up. They realize the routines and choices they make are what matters.

    With these 4, it will still be a challenge, but you will win with your students.
     
  23. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 30, 2015

    Kindy... It seems you've briefly tried a few things, but what is your deeply held philosophy on behavior mgt? What guides you in your decision making regarding your classroom culture? These are what should direct you in how to proceed. You've been trying and giving up on tools, let your aide manage through fear and intimidation and sent the message to your kids that youre not in charge. A behavior chart and incentives MAY help, but they are just tools as are flicking lights, clapping patterns, marble jars....you need understand the motivations of your kids' misbehaviors, how to be proactive in your strategies, manage behaviors without losing instructional time and creating a classroom culture of belonging and respect where learning is the focus and misbehaviors are minimal. Some professional reading or coursework may help, but you've got to get a handle on this TOMORROW.
     

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