Classroom Fish

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by Ms.Manda08, Aug 24, 2008.

  1. Ms.Manda08

    Ms.Manda08 Rookie

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    Aug 24, 2008

    I'm starting my first year teaching preschool this September, and we are allowed to have fish as our classroom pets.

    I was wanting to know if anyone has had fish in their classrooms, and what kind if any, were best for the classroom environment.

    I thinking about purchasing a beta since I could use it as our pet and our plant (we're supposed to have at least one plant in our rooms), but I heard they die early, especially if they're in a tank which the temp is not regulated.

    Thanks in advance for all your help!
    :p :thanks:
     
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  3. math_teacher

    math_teacher Companion

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    Aug 24, 2008

    I've heard the opposite about betas...I've heard they are rather resilient....I even have a friend who owns a beta that is 4 years old(?)....3 or 4....
     
  4. DaveF

    DaveF Companion

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    Aug 24, 2008

    My aquarium has Koi in it. I buy them small for $4 each and grow them until they are about 6", then they go home to my pond.
     
  5. happypreteach

    happypreteach Rookie

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    I have a beta. They are extremely resilient. My fish is in a tank with a small filter during the year, then he has spent the summer in a vase at my house this summer with no filter. I love Betas the only draw back is you can only have one.
     
  6. MissHunny

    MissHunny Comrade

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    Aug 24, 2008

    I've had a beta for 2 years now...and I barely ever feed it or clean its tank/change the water. This thing won't die!! Like seriously I will wait until it have only one inch of water in the tank lol. So easy.... the kids named him Blueberry bc of his lovely color.
     
  7. Exclaimation Po

    Exclaimation Po Habitué

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    Aug 29, 2008

    I have a Betta at home and have been thinking of getting one for school. I'm worried about breaks and time off, though.
     
  8. Emma35

    Emma35 Connoisseur

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    Aug 29, 2008

    Do yo need to have a filter if you have a Beta fish or can it just be in a tank with no filtration system?
     
  9. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Aug 29, 2008

    The retiring teacher was kind enough to leave a huge tank for me (close to 30 gallons I think). I bought a new filter for it and used the plastic plants and gravel she had already.

    I've had the filter running for at least a week now-- I put in live bacteria (they keep it in a fridge so you have to add it right into your tank after you buy it because the bacteria will wake up when it comes up) yesterday. Today I went to Petco and bought 3 different kinds of goldfish--- 6 regular kind, 2 black ones, 2 black and gold speckled. They all can live at the same temp (without a heater), they get along with one another, and can eat the same food. They poop ALOT but that just means I have to change the filter more often and clean the water a little more often.

    As for Beta fish, they're usually kept in a small tank with no filter system and no heater. But personally I sorta think that's cruel since they deserve to have a happy life as a pet. I would suggest getting a decent size tank for them to let them actually get a chance to swim around. If there's no filter system, that just means you have to change the water more often. Depending on where you buy the Beta fish, they can either live for a short time (which is honestly often the case since they're cheap to reproduce) or a long time. My old roommate had one for about two years until he got this fin disease--- which reminds me: Make sure you know what a healthy Beta looks like: beautiful coloring, swimming around alot, NOT going up to the top of the water to suck in air, and the fins should not be shredded apart (which is often the case--- this is a fin disease they easily get).

    I know for goldfish you have to feed them every other day--- I have 3 day feeders and 5 day feeders for holidays already. Beta fish get fed even less often, so they can make a good pet for that reason.
     

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