classified students

Discussion in 'General Education' started by hac711, May 27, 2010.

  1. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    May 27, 2010

    GRRR!!! So today I was in the office and I jokingly said something to my boss about how surprised I was that certain students were not classified. He stopped doing what he was doing, went to our Perm. records file and pulled out the students' files that I was talking about....all of them had scores low enough to be classified yet they have not received any additional tutoring or help this year:eek:!!! I was mortified. So I politely asked if there was any reason why?? I was told it was overlooked, but hopefully someone will do the paperwork for next year!!!! I do not know what to do...all year I was struggling with these kids, giving them one on one, lessening their workload, minimizing their daily goals (what they need to accomplish by the end of the day) and they are all learning disabled!!Should I notify the parents that their child is certified to get extra help so the parents can take charge of the matter or let the school admin handle it?? I am not returning to this school next year, but I fear the lashback from parents. Is it my responsibility or the admin's??? I feel it is administrative duty (according to our school policy all test scores and county programs are issued through the office) but I think they will not inform parents.... any suggestions???
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 27, 2010

    Why didn't you seek help through your child study team? This was your responsibility...it's not a matter of hoping someone will take care of it next year...what if every teacher did that? Sad.

    I'm also not on board/not understanding flippant comments to an administrator about struggling kids/kids who should be classified. You might want to take some additional professional development classes on inclusion/teaching for all learners before you commit to another job in this profession. :2cents:
     
  4. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    May 27, 2010

    I think you have to be tested to be learning disabled. Did you mean that they were tested already and were in a special ed. program? Or that they qualified for placement into another kind of service your district offers? What grade level are you? Elementary teachers have fewer students and it's easy to keep a record of each student's scores on various tests. I can see the logistics of how difficult it would be in high school, however, even though Czacza was a bit harsh, it would seem like a good idea to look through records when you're having trouble with students.

    At any rate, it is frustrating when students slip between the records gap and aren't placed on appropriate lists. Someone else is not doing their job correctly.

    I'm sure you feel good about having taken the time to work with them to meet their needs whether or not they were placed in any program.

    Yes, I'd make a note to the correct person and have them placed on whatever roster your school has for their needs. No, I would not notify the parents.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 28, 2010

    Can you speak to the teacher(s) who will have those kids next year?
     
  6. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    May 28, 2010

    Use this as a reminder to look through each child's cum folder before the new school year begins.

    Also, be sure to ask parents about any problems at your first parent-teacher conference event. My teaching partner and I were shocked to learn just two months ago that one of our students had a physical limitation that was not mentioned in his cum folder or by the parent!
     
  7. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    May 28, 2010

    I don't have access to any of this information. Like I said, we are suppose to be informed through the admin. We don't have a child study team. We have teachers, a secretary and a principal. Thats it.
     
  8. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    May 28, 2010

    also we don't have a special ed program...the kids are taken out 1-3 times a week with a County specialist. We don't do special ed at all.
     
  9. bros

    bros Phenom

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    May 28, 2010

    I am assuming you are in a private school?
     
  10. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    yes, I work in private
     
  11. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    May 28, 2010

    Wow- that's awfully judgmental and, imo, rude. The poster was asking for help, not a tongue lashing. I'm sure we've all made comments we wouldn't want to be made public and we've all let things slide that we shouldn't have, only to figure that out later. And remember that even though they have to obey the law, things can be a LOT different in a private school than a public one. Most private schools I've dealt with don't even offer special education services- kids who don't qualify for regular ed. get booted.

    I think I would sit down and document everything I could remember from the year that I did to provide accomodations for the student and add it to his/her permanent records file. Then I'd speak with the admin. about how you are upset by the fact that you were led to believe the student(s) didn't have learning disabilities. Since you're leaving, you could likely get away with approaching it from an "I just wanted to make you aware of the problem" standpoint.

    I don't think it's your place to tell the parents about it, but others may feel differently...?
     
  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 28, 2010

    I tend not to make remarks to administrators that 'I don't want made public'...Seriously? Once you open your mouth, it's public.

    Complaining about kids for whom you have not sought out help through the other professionals in district is irresponsible...It's the 'it's not my job man' mentality and then to say that hopefully next year someone else will do the paperwork? That's called letting kids fall through the cracks on your watch. Judgemental? Maybe. I take this profession seriously enough to think that teachers should be doing what they can to facilitate learning for their kids, assessing their needs, reaching out to other professionals for help when needed and NOT passing the buck. Call that judgemental if you will. I call it being a responsible professional educator.
     
  13. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    I don't think their was any mention of complaining...also it was the admin who said they would hopefully check into it next year...can you not read???
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 28, 2010

    OK, maybe there was not complaining but there was JOKING about kids who 'should be classified'. That's even worse. Maybe it's me...just not thinking that's something of which a professional educator 'jokes'. Yes, I can read. I can also reach out and find help for my students who need more than I can give them without passing the responsibility to next year's teacher.
     
  15. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    May 30, 2010

    SHE:
    is angry
    was in the office
    jokingly said she was surprised that students weren't classified
    was mortified
    politely asked why they hadn't had tutoring
    struggled with the kids all year- gave them one on one help, lessened their workload, and minimized their daily goals
    sincerely wants to know if other professional educators believe she should notify the parents- is wondering if she's been misled into believing it's administrative duty

    The Administration:
    apparently felt comfortable with her making comments in a joking manner
    knew that the students had learning disabilities and never informed her
    by their own admission, "overlooked" the necessary paperwork to get these kids help

    I know that in my school (public school) I am responsible for looking through assessment folders and permanent records to determine which incoming students require modifications, etc. But I was not informed of that by my admin the first year I taught. I wasn't even sure what the assessment folders were for, to be honest. Does that mean I didn't want to help the kids? NO! And I honestly don't think this teacher feels good about what happened, either. She likely, in retrospect, wishes like crazy she had asked about it earlier in the year, and I'm sure in the future she will.

    What she wants right now are opinions about what to do with the information she now has.

    I did NOT read anything in her post that leads me to believe she was trying to put things off on another teacher. She seems to want to do something before she leaves her current school...She's simply asking if she should let the parents know or leave it up to the administration.

    And it's WONDERFUL that you, CZACZA, have a perfect track record with your teaching and your conversations. Most of the rest of us are human.
     
  16. futureteach21

    futureteach21 Habitué

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    May 30, 2010

    This thread is not on the right course. The OP cannot go back and change what she has done/missed/said to anyone, so debating that is pointless. She is asking for how best to handle the situation now and how to move forward.

    Can you talk to your admin or a mentor teacher on what they think is best? Or maybe their teacher next year? Getting someone's opinion who is right there with you might be the best track. I think you before you admit to parents that someone dropped the ball this year, you should run it by your P just to be safe.
     
  17. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    May 30, 2010

    Thanks to those who had positive suggestions on what to do. I was really at a loss. I think I will definitely write up reports for those students and what they accomplished this year, but I will mention something to a co-teacher in the school who also happens to be a parent in the school and whose kid should have received county help. I think she will be able to spread the word to other parents who an put the pressure on the admin. Since we are private, parents have a lot of pull. Talking to the P won't help. He is a puppet of the board and doesn't know what's flying. Don't know who their teacher is going to be next year. We are having a major turnover (due to the crazy running of this place) so that was my dilemma with talking to parents. I am afraid they will be left in the dark because anybody new won't have access to their reports.
    A big thanks to those who have been supportive.
     
  18. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    May 30, 2010

    So the teachers don't automatically have access to the reports or permanent records?? How in the world can you offer help to those students, then?? :eek: Wow- I'm really sorry for that you've had to struggle so this year and I feel so fortunate to have access to just about any and all information on my kids. I couldn't imagine teaching without it!

    I appreciate your willingness to pass on the word to another teacher/parent to be aware of when it would be so much easier to just move on and put it behind you. I can tell you have a heart for the kids you teach. :thumb:

    Good luck in your new job next year!
     
  19. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 31, 2010

    Wow, queenie. I strongly believe that it is a professional educator's duty to seek out background information on the students we teach and to reach out to other professionals when the modifications we are using are having little effect. Joking about students' needs is not funny. I don't have any qualms with stating that. Educators should take their responsibilities seriously. Wow. Let's put ourselves in the student's or parents' shoes- how would they feel if they overheard such a conversation? In the school office none-the-less?

    It is clear from the OP's remarks that s/he is angry, that s/he fears 'lashback' from the parents regarding this situation and asked about whose responsibility this is. As classroom teachers, we know our kids best, have ongoing and current knowledge regarding their performance and are responsible for facilitating their success- even if that means looking through school records and reaching out to other professionals.

    While it is late in the year, the OP would be well advised to contact the students' parents, delineate the strategies used this year, share assessments and suggest that s/he is filling out paperwork to have their children further evaluated so that they may receive extra help next year. Passing on this responsibility to next year's teacher, or to the administration, will only delay these kids getting the help they need.
     
  20. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    :thumb: Agreed! While I REALLY appreciate the level of professionalism you hold teachers to, I think on this forum we're looking for FRIENDLY advice. Had you posted THIS and left out the reprimand, your post would have been taken much differently. You catch more flies with honey than vinegar, you know. :hugs:

    I completely agree that it is our duty to seek out background information on the students we teach, especially when all we're trying isn't working. I was simply saying that not everyone (esp. new teachers) think to do this. They sure didn't teach me that in college! Naive or not, I assumed that if a child had special needs the admin. would let me know. NOW, three years later, I know it's my responsibility...but I came to that knowledge only by observing and listening to other teachers.

    I also agree that joking about learning disabilities is not professional. But I don't think she was joking about students that she thought HAD learning disabilities. I think she was surpised that they didn't because of all the struggles she had with them in the classroom and likely just made a comment about it.

    Honestly, my first thought when I read her original post was, "Wow- I wonder why she didn't look through their records at the beginning of the year?" That thought was immediately followed by my second and third thoughts: "Oh, it's a private school," and "Well, I didn't know any better my first year, either, and she IS seeking advice."

    CZACZA, I apologize for getting defensive. I should've just read your post and then posted a response to HER question. I just value this forum and want others to feel comfortable asking for advice without the fear of being attacked. But you should feel comfortable posting your opinions, as well, without that fear. Like I said, I'm far too human and I jump the gun a lot of times when something is important to me. I guess we have that in common ;)
     
  21. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 31, 2010

    Thanks for your response. I never meant to come off as harsh- I value our profession greatly and do tend to 'call it as I see it' :whistle:. Even in a private school with few services, it is an educator's responsibility to see out the information and support they need to facilitate success for their students. It seemed to me from the OP's remarks that s/he felt somewhat responsible and feared backlash. The OP was justified in these thoughts. Teachers should be proactive ALL year so as to be left with the knowledge that we have done all we could to help our students. :thumb:
     
  22. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    May 31, 2010

    teachers at the school do not have access to records, that is what I am trying to say. The admin does all that paperwork. If we have an issue about a kid who we think is LD, we fill out a form, that is what we are allowed to do. Furthermore in private schools a lot of the money is dependent on funds from parents in the form of gifts and monetary promises. Telling a parent their kid is LD puts them as a risk to leave to go to a school that has sped ed, which we do not. Private schools are run VERY differently than public. I wish people would realize this.
     
  23. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 31, 2010

    I've worked in private schools. While they may not have the resources that public schools do, the goal of any school should be to ensure success for all students. Hiding academic struggles from parents is not going to help a school's bottom line, in fact not meeting student needs will hurt the school's financial status and reputation.
     

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