classification of class

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by shoebottom, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. shoebottom

    shoebottom Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2011
    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 11, 2013

    How can a class with severe and profound students be labeled in a mild/ moderate class?
     
  2.  
  3. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 11, 2013

    What do you mean?

    You mean you were told you're teaching mild/moderate and the class is severe/profound?

    Or it's a class including a wide range of ability levels?

    In most states, there's not an actual label of "severe/profound" versus "mild/moderate," but it's usually just an informal way to describe the students.

    In my district, I teach in the "severe/profound" autism classroom, but there is also a moderate classroom and a mild classroom for students with autism. They are all labeled "autistic support" on paper and no teacher or parent could tell which is which from looking at records or schedules. So, it's possible that the population used to be mild/moderate and it was considered that, and now the population has shifted and it was still being called that.

    If you're in one of the states that does actually classify between the two, then I don't know.
     
  4. shoebottom

    shoebottom Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2011
    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 11, 2013

    Truly I am not sure. I was told that I will be teaching self contained sped. I have an add on endorsement of mild to moderate sped. My students have been described as serve/profound by another teacher. I just know that I do not have the certification for that and I am confused about the whole situation. I did not know the extent of the disabilities of the students when I signed my contract and I am completely confused at how I am able to be the teacher in the class.
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,839
    Likes Received:
    694

    Aug 11, 2013

    I was offered a severe needs position right out of college and I only had my mild/moderate certificate. They told me that they could get it around it due to the "moderate" classification on my license. In my state and the state I moved from, any time you're talking about a self-contained class that means the students are moderate-severe. Mild-moderate students are always either in full inclusion or in a resource room for a small part of the day. The only exception I've heard of for that is CA- they apparently have something called a "special day class" which is basically self-contained for mild-moderate students who they think won't do well in gen ed. I've never understood how they can get around LRE and do that.
     
  6. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,325
    Likes Received:
    1,283

    Aug 11, 2013

    If you look at the IQ cut-off to be technically considered "severe" or "profound", it's actually pretty low. A student can still be very high-needs but not have a low enough IQ score to called severe or profound. My class last year ranged from students that were mild LD and in my room only 30 min per day to students that were self-contained in my room, with the exception of recess, lunch, and specials. Everyone in there was considered mild or, at most, moderate.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. MrsC,
  2. futuremathsprof,
  3. Mamabygrace,
  4. Backroads,
  5. vickilyn
Total: 236 (members: 7, guests: 201, robots: 28)
test